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GreyHorse

30 days in the feedyard... Finally, out of DRs and getting the finishing touches

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Hi greyhorse.That augie or charlie is a very good boy.Sometimes giving a horse a job brings out the best in them.I wish we would of had time to go to the feed lots just to see how they work.It's good to see you posting this so we get to see how a real cowgirl lives. [smiley Wavey]

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Hi greyhorse.That augie or charlie is a very good boy.Sometimes giving a horse a job brings out the best in them.I wish we would of had time to go to the feed lots just to see how they work.It's good to see you posting this so we get to see how a real cowgirl lives. [smiley Wavey]

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quote:

Originally posted by Duke_of_Earlsboro:

Hi greyhorse.That augie or charlie is a very good boy.Sometimes giving a horse a job brings out the best in them.
[smiley Wavey]

Heya Duke

I wondered if you'd recognize him. You'd be so proud of your trusty pardner. As good as he treated you is as good as he's trying to treat me.

I don't think my saddle quite fits him, so tomorrow I'll try another one, and see what comes up.

Shakey (my daughter's boyfriend) got to come home and get ready for barrel racing, while Fitch (the grey/white paint I rode when you were here) is getting an education in patience and obedience.

I love my job. It is the perfect horse training environment and I find I've learned a little bit since the last time I rode in a feedyard. I'm actually finding more training opportunities than before.

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quote:

Originally posted by Duke_of_Earlsboro:

Hi greyhorse.That augie or charlie is a very good boy.Sometimes giving a horse a job brings out the best in them.
[smiley Wavey]

Heya Duke

I wondered if you'd recognize him. You'd be so proud of your trusty pardner. As good as he treated you is as good as he's trying to treat me.

I don't think my saddle quite fits him, so tomorrow I'll try another one, and see what comes up.

Shakey (my daughter's boyfriend) got to come home and get ready for barrel racing, while Fitch (the grey/white paint I rode when you were here) is getting an education in patience and obedience.

I love my job. It is the perfect horse training environment and I find I've learned a little bit since the last time I rode in a feedyard. I'm actually finding more training opportunities than before.

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It was Augie's turn again today.

And seeins it was Saturday, half the crew is off. That makes 3 of us on a normal day, but one of us called in sick to boot, which left only two of us to handle the entire yard.

And it was a killer of a day.

We shipped 3 pens first thing in the am, moved one pen and then rode pens.

Augie did great. Today, I didn't have time to deal with any colt stuff, and my good hearted feller didn't gimme any. The shipping gates are really, really heavy. But he pulled or pushed them as good as he could, not always perfect, but always with his best effort.

Jesus and me got the cattle out of the pens, moved them across the feedyard to the shipping alley, Once we had cattle to the shipping alley, my friend Jesus was running the scale, leaving me to bring cattle by myself. This involves riding down one side of the alley, letting the cattle flow by you as you get a count, then mashing them onto the scale, where you have to shut the heaviest gate of all as fast as you can. Augie worked the setup, listening for guidance with trust and confidence. Never screwed up once.

It took us till just after 9:30 to get all that done. That's 3 hours of heavy duty work. All 4 of us, horses and riders, breathed a sigh of relief when we finally started riding pens.

Because the work was so hard and intense for the first 3 hours, I let Augie just kinda go as he wanted for a while. But when he gave me the first sign of bossiness, I figured "ok, you got your second wind". I asked him to tuck here and there, especially on the gates, seeins that develops the most valuable muscles. That takes a little more time, so when I could I'd trot to make up time. Trotting is good for something like that, seeins the horse gets to stretch and relax during a nice free posting trot. It's forward movement w/out any demands.

By lunch time we only had about 2/3 of the feedyard rode. So, after lunch, I rode another long alley, and then put Augie into the trailer to check the outside yards (those are two smaller feedyards that go w/ the big one), while Jesus rode the rest of the pens.

Augie spent a big part of the afternoon worrying about what the heck he was doing in the trailer. We mostly walk the pens in the outyards, cause they are so small. We only take the horse along in case we gotta pull something. So here he is, loose in this big ole stock trailer, worrying about what is coming next. LOL... You'd figure he'd be tired enough to just rest in the trailer, but young horses are young horses... "This is weird!!! Where are my Buddies?!?"

After that I went back to the main yard to help Jesus doctor our pulls.

That reminds me... I pulled 4 head today, and Augie did great for every one of them. One of them got away from him and run down the fence, and my young, inexperienced horse run him down and mashed him into the fence to turn him around. This horse has cow coming out his ears. Mostly, I saw a lot more of those clumsy but well meant cutting horse jumps as he read what each calf was gonna do. I tried to balance to help him as much as I could and I think he's starting to get quite a bit smoother. Especially when I use my legs to set up his hindquarters to be ready for what the calf is gonna do next.

All in all, he did great. I know that the new saddle is helping him out a lot more, too, but he gave me an honest effort all day long.

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It was Augie's turn again today.

And seeins it was Saturday, half the crew is off. That makes 3 of us on a normal day, but one of us called in sick to boot, which left only two of us to handle the entire yard.

And it was a killer of a day.

We shipped 3 pens first thing in the am, moved one pen and then rode pens.

Augie did great. Today, I didn't have time to deal with any colt stuff, and my good hearted feller didn't gimme any. The shipping gates are really, really heavy. But he pulled or pushed them as good as he could, not always perfect, but always with his best effort.

Jesus and me got the cattle out of the pens, moved them across the feedyard to the shipping alley, Once we had cattle to the shipping alley, my friend Jesus was running the scale, leaving me to bring cattle by myself. This involves riding down one side of the alley, letting the cattle flow by you as you get a count, then mashing them onto the scale, where you have to shut the heaviest gate of all as fast as you can. Augie worked the setup, listening for guidance with trust and confidence. Never screwed up once.

It took us till just after 9:30 to get all that done. That's 3 hours of heavy duty work. All 4 of us, horses and riders, breathed a sigh of relief when we finally started riding pens.

Because the work was so hard and intense for the first 3 hours, I let Augie just kinda go as he wanted for a while. But when he gave me the first sign of bossiness, I figured "ok, you got your second wind". I asked him to tuck here and there, especially on the gates, seeins that develops the most valuable muscles. That takes a little more time, so when I could I'd trot to make up time. Trotting is good for something like that, seeins the horse gets to stretch and relax during a nice free posting trot. It's forward movement w/out any demands.

By lunch time we only had about 2/3 of the feedyard rode. So, after lunch, I rode another long alley, and then put Augie into the trailer to check the outside yards (those are two smaller feedyards that go w/ the big one), while Jesus rode the rest of the pens.

Augie spent a big part of the afternoon worrying about what the heck he was doing in the trailer. We mostly walk the pens in the outyards, cause they are so small. We only take the horse along in case we gotta pull something. So here he is, loose in this big ole stock trailer, worrying about what is coming next. LOL... You'd figure he'd be tired enough to just rest in the trailer, but young horses are young horses... "This is weird!!! Where are my Buddies?!?"

After that I went back to the main yard to help Jesus doctor our pulls.

That reminds me... I pulled 4 head today, and Augie did great for every one of them. One of them got away from him and run down the fence, and my young, inexperienced horse run him down and mashed him into the fence to turn him around. This horse has cow coming out his ears. Mostly, I saw a lot more of those clumsy but well meant cutting horse jumps as he read what each calf was gonna do. I tried to balance to help him as much as I could and I think he's starting to get quite a bit smoother. Especially when I use my legs to set up his hindquarters to be ready for what the calf is gonna do next.

All in all, he did great. I know that the new saddle is helping him out a lot more, too, but he gave me an honest effort all day long.

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I wish we lived closer.When your short handed we would love to help out.Nobody has opened up there sorting pens yet and we like to work cattle.We like it so much we pay to do it. [smiley Wavey]

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I wish we lived closer.When your short handed we would love to help out.Nobody has opened up there sorting pens yet and we like to work cattle.We like it so much we pay to do it. [smiley Wavey]

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WOW! GreyHorse. . . Sounds like Augie has an afinity for working da cows. . . He seems to be catching on so quickly! Keep the updates coming! I'm really enjoying the Saga of Augie and GreyHorse! [big Grin]

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WOW! GreyHorse. . . Sounds like Augie has an afinity for working da cows. . . He seems to be catching on so quickly! Keep the updates coming! I'm really enjoying the Saga of Augie and GreyHorse! [big Grin]

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Heya all

Today Augie gave me the first bump in the road.

It was pretty much a normal day. Just one pen to ship, and then straight to riding pens.

I only pulled one, and I couldn't get her out by myself. The pen was in a bad spot and it had a big ole **** mountain in the middle. The heiffer just kept running around that mud mountain. I tried two passes and then rode on till someone else had time to help me. Augie did a fine job, but it just wasn't gonna work.

I thought he was getting a little smoother at working with the cattle. I only got this one chance to let him work again, but I still think he's starting to smooth down his work and not put quite so much over-effort into it.

We were done riding at 11 am, lots of help, not too many pulls, everything went smooth.

All morning long he did fine on his laterals, needing a little spur sometimes so as to not get lazy, but using what skills he had very well.

The head tuck was great in the morning. Not real easy, but not an issue either.

When I took him back out after lunch to sort off some retreats in the hospital, tho, it was like I was riding a different horse.

He would not tuck his head to save his life. It started slowly, just a little "no, not right now" here and there, while we were sorting. Now, while he's on a cow, I really can't always enforce what I ask for right then and there. Sometimes it is more important to get the cow out, than to pick on your horse. And I ended up having to let quite a few of them slide.

Then we doctored our pulls and put them away.

Well, while we put the pulls away, and I'd ask him to tuck now and again. Augie flat refused. I'd stay with him till he gave, but the time of resistance was by far longer than the time of give and my release.

After all that, when we finally rode to the barn, Augie again completely refused.

You may have heard me say this before, but there is a lot of horse training that goes on between 8pm and 8am. And the note I ended up having to quit on will certainly sink in good. I'll have loads and loads of trouble day after tomorrow.

I talked to Nick when I got home tonite, and he told me he'd had the same problem w/ him. He'd teach him to give to rein and leg, and after a while the horse would just plumb refuse, and only give after a major fight.

See... I chewed Nick's butt big time after Augie's first day, when I found non-existent laterals and non-existent nose give. He was supposed to have covered all this stuff.

And come to think about it, I rode the horse here and there while Nick had him. I know (and now remember) that I used both. Nick did do the job. But Augie decided to chose his moments.

Stay tuned to see how I handle this... LOL!!!

[ 05-07-2007, 11:58 PM: Message edited by: GreyHorse ]

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Heya all

Today Augie gave me the first bump in the road.

It was pretty much a normal day. Just one pen to ship, and then straight to riding pens.

I only pulled one, and I couldn't get her out by myself. The pen was in a bad spot and it had a big ole **** mountain in the middle. The heiffer just kept running around that mud mountain. I tried two passes and then rode on till someone else had time to help me. Augie did a fine job, but it just wasn't gonna work.

I thought he was getting a little smoother at working with the cattle. I only got this one chance to let him work again, but I still think he's starting to smooth down his work and not put quite so much over-effort into it.

We were done riding at 11 am, lots of help, not too many pulls, everything went smooth.

All morning long he did fine on his laterals, needing a little spur sometimes so as to not get lazy, but using what skills he had very well.

The head tuck was great in the morning. Not real easy, but not an issue either.

When I took him back out after lunch to sort off some retreats in the hospital, tho, it was like I was riding a different horse.

He would not tuck his head to save his life. It started slowly, just a little "no, not right now" here and there, while we were sorting. Now, while he's on a cow, I really can't always enforce what I ask for right then and there. Sometimes it is more important to get the cow out, than to pick on your horse. And I ended up having to let quite a few of them slide.

Then we doctored our pulls and put them away.

Well, while we put the pulls away, and I'd ask him to tuck now and again. Augie flat refused. I'd stay with him till he gave, but the time of resistance was by far longer than the time of give and my release.

After all that, when we finally rode to the barn, Augie again completely refused.

You may have heard me say this before, but there is a lot of horse training that goes on between 8pm and 8am. And the note I ended up having to quit on will certainly sink in good. I'll have loads and loads of trouble day after tomorrow.

I talked to Nick when I got home tonite, and he told me he'd had the same problem w/ him. He'd teach him to give to rein and leg, and after a while the horse would just plumb refuse, and only give after a major fight.

See... I chewed Nick's butt big time after Augie's first day, when I found non-existent laterals and non-existent nose give. He was supposed to have covered all this stuff.

And come to think about it, I rode the horse here and there while Nick had him. I know (and now remember) that I used both. Nick did do the job. But Augie decided to chose his moments.

Stay tuned to see how I handle this... LOL!!!

[ 05-07-2007, 11:58 PM: Message edited by: GreyHorse ]

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He's starting to learn his job pretty well. Even with the off day. Can't wait for more Augie updates. [big Grin]

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Duke

On Saturday, I actually called Hannah to see if she wanted to help. But she was working for someone else already.

Too bad you live so far away. I know I could get you a part time job riding for these guys on the weekends. You wouldn't even have to pay them... too much. LOL.

Thank you and the Duchess for the very fine knives. We'll both be carrying them w/ pride.

RT...

I don't know "30 days in the hole", but I tend to sing "sixteen tons, what do you get, another day older and deeper in debt." whenever we slog thru all this mud.

On the up-side, all the decent weather we've had recently, things finally drying out some.

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He's starting to learn his job pretty well. Even with the off day. Can't wait for more Augie updates. [big Grin]

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Duke

On Saturday, I actually called Hannah to see if she wanted to help. But she was working for someone else already.

Too bad you live so far away. I know I could get you a part time job riding for these guys on the weekends. You wouldn't even have to pay them... too much. LOL.

Thank you and the Duchess for the very fine knives. We'll both be carrying them w/ pride.

RT...

I don't know "30 days in the hole", but I tend to sing "sixteen tons, what do you get, another day older and deeper in debt." whenever we slog thru all this mud.

On the up-side, all the decent weather we've had recently, things finally drying out some.

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Alright... Time to make ole Augie ante up.

We rode out this morning for the shipping pens and Augie was wearing a cool new set of draw reins. The are red cord w/ a couple of snaps attached to the cinch, fed thru his double broken snaffle to my hands. Except they aren't long enough for Augie, so when I'm not using them, they sorta just sit at about the middle of his neck.

Omar, one of the cowboys,was teasing me. "Tsk, tsk, that's cheating."

"No, Omar, this is thinking."

"How's that?"

"When I ask him to tuck his head, I'm asking him to work on building muscle in spots that are important for the rest of his ability. When he resists, he is actually building the muscles opposite those that I want.

If I ask him to tuck, and he resists for seven seconds, then gives in for 1 second and I give to him the next for his reward, which muscle group is getting the most exercise?"

"Um... The bad one."

"Yup. But these draw reins make it to where he never gets the choice to resist. I ask and he gets to answer. These guys here'll take the wind out of his sails."

I got another dubious look, so I said "Don't worry, I'm pretty good at using them."

We had plenty of help today, so I took a little bit of time on the way to the shipping alley to get Augie used to the feel of them. As I expected I got a huge hissy fit on the first time I asked to tuck and bring his back up. I engaged the drawreins and got a little bit more resistance, but then grudging compliance.

Like I said, w/ plenty of help, shipping wasn't the mad dash that it was on Saturday, so I had some time while we were setting gates. Augie was seriously ticked that his way of moving was going to be dictated to him. But that's alright. He'll get over it. Most of the time when we are just walking or trotting along, I leave them loose on the neck.

If I was to engage them all the time, I'd have him so stiff and sore, I couldn't ride him again till next month.

So I'm using them only when I need him to engage and get under me, so that he can more accurately do what I ask him to do.

I used them on almost all of the gates. He never gave me the idea that he would actually comply without them. I pulled a couple of calves, but most of that time I let him work on his own, seeins he seems to be pretty good at it anyways. But when it came to hold on and wait a little bit, I'd go ahead and grab them so that he'd get back under me and be ready to go for whatever the calf wanted to do.

It was a good day, all in all, even tho I definitely think I'll need them again next time. Over time, as his resistance decreased, he became more supple and relaxed. Exactly what I had been hoping for.

One problem I don't know what to do about, is that Augie still walks slower than an aging snail. I'm still having to trot between pens to keep up w/ the other pen riders. Riding down alleys is hopeless, and I'm actually letting him jig, just to keep up w/ the conversation and find out where we are going next.

Not even when we are heading to the barn does he manage to get out of his slow creep.

That's about all for today.

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Alright... Time to make ole Augie ante up.

We rode out this morning for the shipping pens and Augie was wearing a cool new set of draw reins. The are red cord w/ a couple of snaps attached to the cinch, fed thru his double broken snaffle to my hands. Except they aren't long enough for Augie, so when I'm not using them, they sorta just sit at about the middle of his neck.

Omar, one of the cowboys,was teasing me. "Tsk, tsk, that's cheating."

"No, Omar, this is thinking."

"How's that?"

"When I ask him to tuck his head, I'm asking him to work on building muscle in spots that are important for the rest of his ability. When he resists, he is actually building the muscles opposite those that I want.

If I ask him to tuck, and he resists for seven seconds, then gives in for 1 second and I give to him the next for his reward, which muscle group is getting the most exercise?"

"Um... The bad one."

"Yup. But these draw reins make it to where he never gets the choice to resist. I ask and he gets to answer. These guys here'll take the wind out of his sails."

I got another dubious look, so I said "Don't worry, I'm pretty good at using them."

We had plenty of help today, so I took a little bit of time on the way to the shipping alley to get Augie used to the feel of them. As I expected I got a huge hissy fit on the first time I asked to tuck and bring his back up. I engaged the drawreins and got a little bit more resistance, but then grudging compliance.

Like I said, w/ plenty of help, shipping wasn't the mad dash that it was on Saturday, so I had some time while we were setting gates. Augie was seriously ticked that his way of moving was going to be dictated to him. But that's alright. He'll get over it. Most of the time when we are just walking or trotting along, I leave them loose on the neck.

If I was to engage them all the time, I'd have him so stiff and sore, I couldn't ride him again till next month.

So I'm using them only when I need him to engage and get under me, so that he can more accurately do what I ask him to do.

I used them on almost all of the gates. He never gave me the idea that he would actually comply without them. I pulled a couple of calves, but most of that time I let him work on his own, seeins he seems to be pretty good at it anyways. But when it came to hold on and wait a little bit, I'd go ahead and grab them so that he'd get back under me and be ready to go for whatever the calf wanted to do.

It was a good day, all in all, even tho I definitely think I'll need them again next time. Over time, as his resistance decreased, he became more supple and relaxed. Exactly what I had been hoping for.

One problem I don't know what to do about, is that Augie still walks slower than an aging snail. I'm still having to trot between pens to keep up w/ the other pen riders. Riding down alleys is hopeless, and I'm actually letting him jig, just to keep up w/ the conversation and find out where we are going next.

Not even when we are heading to the barn does he manage to get out of his slow creep.

That's about all for today.

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Augie didn't realize that it would have been easier on him to cooperate. [big Grin] It sounds like you don't have to worry about him running off with that walk. [big Grin] Great update. It does sound like he will eventually come around to your way of thinking.

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Augie didn't realize that it would have been easier on him to cooperate. [big Grin] It sounds like you don't have to worry about him running off with that walk. [big Grin] Great update. It does sound like he will eventually come around to your way of thinking.

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Ooooh, I'll be glad to get the day off tomorrow. I'm a tired puppy.

The draw reins for Augie again today.

He finally started giving to them, and rounding and bringing his back up. But, as is always the case w/ DRs he also started to fall on his front. I showed Omar how he was falling on his front and explained that you gotta do a lot of laterals to lift the shoulder to keep the horse from divebombing.

I missed using them once on the gate when I should have. Another time we were getting a calf out, and I grabbed the DRs at exactly the wrong moment. He was just getting ready to move his frontend over w/ the calf, when my inappropriate use dumped him in midstride back onto the ground. Ooops, my bad.

Other than that, the whole idea for the drawreins is to allow him to develop muscles in the right spots. So when I could I let him lean on the drawreins while carrying himself in frame for a little while.

I also used them to make him work harder while he was jigging to keep up w/ the other horses. Sides a little leg pressure and he was having to push with his hindend while he was jigging, which could only help when ever he does finally figure out how to free up his shoulders and let those legs go to work.

One of the guys looked back at me when we were jigging back to the barn and said "Make him walk! You shouldn't let him jig like that."

I felt like telling him that this wasn't my first rodee. But I held my tongue and just patiently explained why I was doing what I was doing. Now, I just hope and pray Augie actually develops like I hope and starts walking pretty soon.

Overall I felt he was getting lighter, more responsive and over all starting to engage more. But that is of course w/ the DRs. We'll see how long I'm gonna have to use them.

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Ooooh, I'll be glad to get the day off tomorrow. I'm a tired puppy.

The draw reins for Augie again today.

He finally started giving to them, and rounding and bringing his back up. But, as is always the case w/ DRs he also started to fall on his front. I showed Omar how he was falling on his front and explained that you gotta do a lot of laterals to lift the shoulder to keep the horse from divebombing.

I missed using them once on the gate when I should have. Another time we were getting a calf out, and I grabbed the DRs at exactly the wrong moment. He was just getting ready to move his frontend over w/ the calf, when my inappropriate use dumped him in midstride back onto the ground. Ooops, my bad.

Other than that, the whole idea for the drawreins is to allow him to develop muscles in the right spots. So when I could I let him lean on the drawreins while carrying himself in frame for a little while.

I also used them to make him work harder while he was jigging to keep up w/ the other horses. Sides a little leg pressure and he was having to push with his hindend while he was jigging, which could only help when ever he does finally figure out how to free up his shoulders and let those legs go to work.

One of the guys looked back at me when we were jigging back to the barn and said "Make him walk! You shouldn't let him jig like that."

I felt like telling him that this wasn't my first rodee. But I held my tongue and just patiently explained why I was doing what I was doing. Now, I just hope and pray Augie actually develops like I hope and starts walking pretty soon.

Overall I felt he was getting lighter, more responsive and over all starting to engage more. But that is of course w/ the DRs. We'll see how long I'm gonna have to use them.

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