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GreyHorse

30 days in the feedyard... Finally, out of DRs and getting the finishing touches

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Oh my gosh... This must be the yr of computer problems for me.

Someone sent me a virus, said it was a mothers day card. Shut that puppy up solid. Can't click on nothing.

You guys will have to wait till after this weekend. Hopefully I'll get me a new computer and then I'll try to catch up on the Augie updates.

BTW, he's doing great

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Oh my gosh... This must be the yr of computer problems for me.

Someone sent me a virus, said it was a mothers day card. Shut that puppy up solid. Can't click on nothing.

You guys will have to wait till after this weekend. Hopefully I'll get me a new computer and then I'll try to catch up on the Augie updates.

BTW, he's doing great

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Ok... where were we...

Oh, yeah, the DRs...

We'll have to do a week in review here. Lemme see I had the weekend off, rode him Monday and Weds, had Friday off, rode him Sat and today.

We'll do last week.

Monday the processors worked a slew of cattle and we shagged cattle all day long. So a lot of that day was spent trotting from pointA to B, go, go, go, hurry hurry hurry.

I used the DRs again, but only handled them on the gates and whenever I wanted him to give his face and back. All the lateral and bending on the gates just gives a training opportunity that is hard to ignore.

He is a good traveller, and I can go from one end of the feedyard to the other almost as fast as a pick up.

I also used that day to work on some important transitions... Like when the other horses are ahead of us, and we are trotting to join up w/ the bunch. What a great opportunity to do a stop transition, to engage the back and to insist on a little obedience.

He griped for the first 3 or 4, but then he got the hang of them, and settled right into them.

I then did a few stops out of a slow lope, and found him strong and able.

Another really cool thing happened that day. We tried to get a tuff calf out, and in the process Augie had to jump over a little mud mountain. Oh about 2 ft high and 2ft wide. Just as soon as he landed, I asked him to slow down to turn the calf, expecting him to miss the request completely. But, again, he surprised the heck out of me, slowed his lope and turned the calf.

On another calf I asked him to fade to the inside. Now remember. since I dumped him on his nose when I used the DRs wrong, I been leaving him plumb alone while he's doing his calf reading. But this time, we needed to give some room as the calf was loping up on the concrete by the feedbunk. Just a little bit of leg, and he gave room like a pro. Shoot, some of my good horses would've missed that and met spur.

I don't know what lead he was on, but in either case, it was a pretty tuff lateral at the lope.

He's gaining strength and obedience, and on Weds I think I picked up the DRs twice.

He's even found a few steps of decent walk here and there. Nothing to keep up w/ the other horses w/, but at least he's not trotting to stay even any more. Meaning that he gets to walk along, his neck and back loose and swinging.

Still a sweet, sweet horse. I'm glad the owners have decided to keep him.

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Ok... where were we...

Oh, yeah, the DRs...

We'll have to do a week in review here. Lemme see I had the weekend off, rode him Monday and Weds, had Friday off, rode him Sat and today.

We'll do last week.

Monday the processors worked a slew of cattle and we shagged cattle all day long. So a lot of that day was spent trotting from pointA to B, go, go, go, hurry hurry hurry.

I used the DRs again, but only handled them on the gates and whenever I wanted him to give his face and back. All the lateral and bending on the gates just gives a training opportunity that is hard to ignore.

He is a good traveller, and I can go from one end of the feedyard to the other almost as fast as a pick up.

I also used that day to work on some important transitions... Like when the other horses are ahead of us, and we are trotting to join up w/ the bunch. What a great opportunity to do a stop transition, to engage the back and to insist on a little obedience.

He griped for the first 3 or 4, but then he got the hang of them, and settled right into them.

I then did a few stops out of a slow lope, and found him strong and able.

Another really cool thing happened that day. We tried to get a tuff calf out, and in the process Augie had to jump over a little mud mountain. Oh about 2 ft high and 2ft wide. Just as soon as he landed, I asked him to slow down to turn the calf, expecting him to miss the request completely. But, again, he surprised the heck out of me, slowed his lope and turned the calf.

On another calf I asked him to fade to the inside. Now remember. since I dumped him on his nose when I used the DRs wrong, I been leaving him plumb alone while he's doing his calf reading. But this time, we needed to give some room as the calf was loping up on the concrete by the feedbunk. Just a little bit of leg, and he gave room like a pro. Shoot, some of my good horses would've missed that and met spur.

I don't know what lead he was on, but in either case, it was a pretty tuff lateral at the lope.

He's gaining strength and obedience, and on Weds I think I picked up the DRs twice.

He's even found a few steps of decent walk here and there. Nothing to keep up w/ the other horses w/, but at least he's not trotting to stay even any more. Meaning that he gets to walk along, his neck and back loose and swinging.

Still a sweet, sweet horse. I'm glad the owners have decided to keep him.

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Yeah, sorry guys. My computer problem still ain't solved. Anyhoooooo... I'm too tired and hungry to post tonite, but don't worry, I'm making notes on how things are progressing. I'll update you ASAP.

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Yeah, sorry guys. My computer problem still ain't solved. Anyhoooooo... I'm too tired and hungry to post tonite, but don't worry, I'm making notes on how things are progressing. I'll update you ASAP.

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Ok... finally got some computer time.

Augie is doing great.

I lost the DRs on Sat and switched him to a little shanked snaffle. 2" shankes, one break, but solid sides and decoration, making the bit fairly heavy. It is not as light as it 2"-shanks would look or sound.

At that time I was still assuming the owner would ride him in a shanked snaffle. Which means Augie has to learn about the curb.

I would've loved to keep him in a regular snaffle, install a little obedience to what I taught him in the DRs, but in 30 days you just don't have the time to do all that. Actually, I'd love to take him home and use the arena for a while, but again, I don't think I have the time to shuffle back and forth like that and get all the teaching done.

He still ain't walking like he could consistently, he's still not carrying himself at the trot and lope (he still speeds up), and he's still spooking at the feed trucks.

So, a shanked bit and no DRs, and off we go to ship. Just two of us again, but only two pens to ship and one pen to move. In the hustle of shipping, I slipped and forgot to make sure that he was doing things correctly. But I'm sure if he had reverted back to camel posture, I'd've noticed that immediately.

Then we went riding pens, and here while things were slower, Augie started figuring out that the DRs are gone. And sure enough (this is a horse we are talking about here), he tested me.

And lost.

So the rest of Sat I had an ear out for failure to yield, LOL, meaning for the camel to show up, and sweet talked him into handling the new bit.

I also started working on putting him into a trot and then disciplining him into staying the speed I asked. That just means that I let him speed up and then more or less sharply pulled him back to where he needed to be.

His walk is improving. The horse the other kid was riding will walk as fast as the other horses around her, so Augie had a good chance to try his new swing.

Monday, I started the task of installing some discipline into the way he reacts to the bit. At this point, I'm still having to ask him to give. But the give should be an automatic reaction to the lifted rein hand. Now, I don't think I can get him there, but I think I can go a long ways towards it. So, it's monday, lots of help, lots of shagging to do for the processors, and I'm doing 15million transitions, giving him a chance to tuck every time, then getting after him if he misses. At Lunch time he's a tired puppy.

Part of all those transitions are the engaged hindquarters and I asked for just a little bit too much.

So, in the afternoon, I volunteered to doctor the sick calves, and Augie gets to spend most of it waiting for me to get done.

He had to pack my butt to the doctor barn, help me move the recovery pens around and load the tub w/ the sick cattle, wait for 2 1/2 hours, then pack me home.

Wednesday, I'm still looking for more of the same.

Engaged topline, flexed poll when the bit is engaged, and engaged hindquarters for just about any maneuver there needs to be.

We ship, then ride pens. Mostly routine. So when we gather all the pulls out of the alleys, I take the opportunity to do some harder transitions, like trot-stop and lope-stop. I got a couple of Yeehaws from the other cowboys watching, altho I didn't really feel like the whoa's were all that super. But they all know where the big bugger started from, and they like him.

EZ, who can't speak english at all, likes Augie quite a bit. But right after lunch, we went back to sort a pen that had gotten mixed. And busting him out after a calf, Augie gave me a couple of crowhops. So E

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Ok... finally got some computer time.

Augie is doing great.

I lost the DRs on Sat and switched him to a little shanked snaffle. 2" shankes, one break, but solid sides and decoration, making the bit fairly heavy. It is not as light as it 2"-shanks would look or sound.

At that time I was still assuming the owner would ride him in a shanked snaffle. Which means Augie has to learn about the curb.

I would've loved to keep him in a regular snaffle, install a little obedience to what I taught him in the DRs, but in 30 days you just don't have the time to do all that. Actually, I'd love to take him home and use the arena for a while, but again, I don't think I have the time to shuffle back and forth like that and get all the teaching done.

He still ain't walking like he could consistently, he's still not carrying himself at the trot and lope (he still speeds up), and he's still spooking at the feed trucks.

So, a shanked bit and no DRs, and off we go to ship. Just two of us again, but only two pens to ship and one pen to move. In the hustle of shipping, I slipped and forgot to make sure that he was doing things correctly. But I'm sure if he had reverted back to camel posture, I'd've noticed that immediately.

Then we went riding pens, and here while things were slower, Augie started figuring out that the DRs are gone. And sure enough (this is a horse we are talking about here), he tested me.

And lost.

So the rest of Sat I had an ear out for failure to yield, LOL, meaning for the camel to show up, and sweet talked him into handling the new bit.

I also started working on putting him into a trot and then disciplining him into staying the speed I asked. That just means that I let him speed up and then more or less sharply pulled him back to where he needed to be.

His walk is improving. The horse the other kid was riding will walk as fast as the other horses around her, so Augie had a good chance to try his new swing.

Monday, I started the task of installing some discipline into the way he reacts to the bit. At this point, I'm still having to ask him to give. But the give should be an automatic reaction to the lifted rein hand. Now, I don't think I can get him there, but I think I can go a long ways towards it. So, it's monday, lots of help, lots of shagging to do for the processors, and I'm doing 15million transitions, giving him a chance to tuck every time, then getting after him if he misses. At Lunch time he's a tired puppy.

Part of all those transitions are the engaged hindquarters and I asked for just a little bit too much.

So, in the afternoon, I volunteered to doctor the sick calves, and Augie gets to spend most of it waiting for me to get done.

He had to pack my butt to the doctor barn, help me move the recovery pens around and load the tub w/ the sick cattle, wait for 2 1/2 hours, then pack me home.

Wednesday, I'm still looking for more of the same.

Engaged topline, flexed poll when the bit is engaged, and engaged hindquarters for just about any maneuver there needs to be.

We ship, then ride pens. Mostly routine. So when we gather all the pulls out of the alleys, I take the opportunity to do some harder transitions, like trot-stop and lope-stop. I got a couple of Yeehaws from the other cowboys watching, altho I didn't really feel like the whoa's were all that super. But they all know where the big bugger started from, and they like him.

EZ, who can't speak english at all, likes Augie quite a bit. But right after lunch, we went back to sort a pen that had gotten mixed. And busting him out after a calf, Augie gave me a couple of crowhops. So E

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Whoops, don't know what happened there.

Anyhoo, EZ likes Augie quite a bit.

So, w/ another guy interpreting, EZ says he don't like my horse any more.

I ask "Why?"

"He bucks!"

I'm thinking if you wanna call those crowhops bucks and say "Sheesh, EZ, even a woman can ride him!!" LOL

Anyhoo, I called the owner and told him about the good progess Augie was making and it sounds like they'll pick him up on Monday.

I traded days off w/ someone, so I have a long weekend this week, and then work for 2 weeks straight to get back to my regular days off.

I'd sure like to get that travelling speed nailed afore I send him back to Colorado. He's still not carrying himself there. So I'll definitely will be working on it on Monday afore they come and get him.

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Whoops, don't know what happened there.

Anyhoo, EZ likes Augie quite a bit.

So, w/ another guy interpreting, EZ says he don't like my horse any more.

I ask "Why?"

"He bucks!"

I'm thinking if you wanna call those crowhops bucks and say "Sheesh, EZ, even a woman can ride him!!" LOL

Anyhoo, I called the owner and told him about the good progess Augie was making and it sounds like they'll pick him up on Monday.

I traded days off w/ someone, so I have a long weekend this week, and then work for 2 weeks straight to get back to my regular days off.

I'd sure like to get that travelling speed nailed afore I send him back to Colorado. He's still not carrying himself there. So I'll definitely will be working on it on Monday afore they come and get him.

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Alright... obviously I'm far behind what Augie is actually doing, seeins he's been back to CO now.

The end of the tale is this...

I started on getting him to rate while trotting and loping, but I didn't get it finished. When I realized that he needed work on that, he was looking for input from the reins almost every step of the way. Now, he'll trot and slowly speed up, till he receives a quiet check. I'd like to have it to where he'll trot in the same speed untill told other wise. But this is all I had time for.

I'd like to say he went home acing his vertical flex every time, but truth is that he'd miss here and there. And he still has to think about it.

The stop signal on the reins brings an instant response of either slow down or stop, depending on what my body position says. I'd like it to also bring an instant response of vertical flex. But that is just not happening. He does flex very nice vertically, but only when he remembers that he should.

His walk is much improved, but definitely not as aggressive as the rest of the feedyard horses. Altho, he'll probly be able to keep up fine w/ other ranch horses.

He's still a big lumbering gentle giant. He'll nver be quick and catty. But his ability to read cows, and his willingness to help the rider will make up for a lot of short comings.

All in all I feel real good about how he's going home.

[ 06-04-2007, 07:40 PM: Message edited by: GreyHorse ]

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Alright... obviously I'm far behind what Augie is actually doing, seeins he's been back to CO now.

The end of the tale is this...

I started on getting him to rate while trotting and loping, but I didn't get it finished. When I realized that he needed work on that, he was looking for input from the reins almost every step of the way. Now, he'll trot and slowly speed up, till he receives a quiet check. I'd like to have it to where he'll trot in the same speed untill told other wise. But this is all I had time for.

I'd like to say he went home acing his vertical flex every time, but truth is that he'd miss here and there. And he still has to think about it.

The stop signal on the reins brings an instant response of either slow down or stop, depending on what my body position says. I'd like it to also bring an instant response of vertical flex. But that is just not happening. He does flex very nice vertically, but only when he remembers that he should.

His walk is much improved, but definitely not as aggressive as the rest of the feedyard horses. Altho, he'll probly be able to keep up fine w/ other ranch horses.

He's still a big lumbering gentle giant. He'll nver be quick and catty. But his ability to read cows, and his willingness to help the rider will make up for a lot of short comings.

All in all I feel real good about how he's going home.

[ 06-04-2007, 07:40 PM: Message edited by: GreyHorse ]

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AAAWWWWWWW!!! I'm gonna miss Augie! But it sounds like you did an outstanding job in the time you had with him. . . I think you've got him on a good track for becoming a really nice riding horse! HEck! If you wanna take MY horse for awhile, he's all yours!!! Don't send him back until he's perfect! [big Grin][Wink]

Keep us up to date on your feedyard ramblings, Grey Horse! Augie or not. . . it's great reading, and I learn alot from your observations and experiences.

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AAAWWWWWWW!!! I'm gonna miss Augie! But it sounds like you did an outstanding job in the time you had with him. . . I think you've got him on a good track for becoming a really nice riding horse! HEck! If you wanna take MY horse for awhile, he's all yours!!! Don't send him back until he's perfect! [big Grin][Wink]

Keep us up to date on your feedyard ramblings, Grey Horse! Augie or not. . . it's great reading, and I learn alot from your observations and experiences.

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