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LakotasMom

Foal haltering problem...

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I can spell somthing wrong from time to time. I am just not as perfect as you, but then nobody here is.

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I can spell somthing wrong from time to time. I am just not as perfect as you, but then nobody here is.

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....ok.. *sigh*

To the OP: DO NOT throw the foal. This is a bad way to start things out for a two week old baby. I like leoned's idea.

The REASON a foal flips in the first place is rarely defiance in any way, shape, or form. It IS and INSTINCTIVE fear of pressure on an extremely sensitive area of the horse.

That being said. Take food bucket out(basically soak a bit of nutrena youth(less that a half cup) and let baby have a "treat". While this is happening, rub all over face and specifically around poll. Stop before baby acts up or whenever baby gets nervous. By 3rd day, have halter sitting in bucke to where baby has to stick head in NOSE PIECE of halter to get treat. Then start play with slipping halter tab over poll--Don't buckle. After 2 more days(or however long it takes) when baby is comfortable with strap across poll.

By now, you should have some idea about how tight the halter needs to be. Buckle it when the foal is used to having it put on(without buckling). Then leave halter on with short drag line.(under supervision) and take it off at night.

Can't beat good experiences in training.

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....ok.. *sigh*

To the OP: DO NOT throw the foal. This is a bad way to start things out for a two week old baby. I like leoned's idea.

The REASON a foal flips in the first place is rarely defiance in any way, shape, or form. It IS and INSTINCTIVE fear of pressure on an extremely sensitive area of the horse.

That being said. Take food bucket out(basically soak a bit of nutrena youth(less that a half cup) and let baby have a "treat". While this is happening, rub all over face and specifically around poll. Stop before baby acts up or whenever baby gets nervous. By 3rd day, have halter sitting in bucke to where baby has to stick head in NOSE PIECE of halter to get treat. Then start play with slipping halter tab over poll--Don't buckle. After 2 more days(or however long it takes) when baby is comfortable with strap across poll.

By now, you should have some idea about how tight the halter needs to be. Buckle it when the foal is used to having it put on(without buckling). Then leave halter on with short drag line.(under supervision) and take it off at night.

Can't beat good experiences in training.

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I have laid foals down before for imprinting sessions. There is nothing wrong with it if you do it right...I do it fast and careful before they even know what happened. My babies have never gotten hurt and end up asleep, head in my lap and the next day and thereafter are total lambs for imprinting and foot handling, and even haltering etc. Normally take once or twice after the initial birth imprint for me. Everything really depends on the horse for me.

Different methods are just that...different. We arent even talking about "throwing" a foal even as hard as you see calf ropers on the dirt or goat tiers or whatever although some of the same principals apply...We are talking about laying it down as gently as possible which for me means in a thick bedded stall normally. Besides young foals are pretty resiliant and rubbery anyway..gods way of protecting accident prone babies...ever watched one running full blast skid out and slam down hard? or run into a fence and flip themselves? They are normally perfectly fine but have learned something about cornering and fences...

I dont understand all the hatefulness over methods here...every horse is different. I had one filly refuse to halter break who threw fits worse than those other pictures....everyone else was a peice of cake.

[ 06-10-2007, 03:55 AM: Message edited by: Trinity ]

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I have laid foals down before for imprinting sessions. There is nothing wrong with it if you do it right...I do it fast and careful before they even know what happened. My babies have never gotten hurt and end up asleep, head in my lap and the next day and thereafter are total lambs for imprinting and foot handling, and even haltering etc. Normally take once or twice after the initial birth imprint for me. Everything really depends on the horse for me.

Different methods are just that...different. We arent even talking about "throwing" a foal even as hard as you see calf ropers on the dirt or goat tiers or whatever although some of the same principals apply...We are talking about laying it down as gently as possible which for me means in a thick bedded stall normally. Besides young foals are pretty resiliant and rubbery anyway..gods way of protecting accident prone babies...ever watched one running full blast skid out and slam down hard? or run into a fence and flip themselves? They are normally perfectly fine but have learned something about cornering and fences...

I dont understand all the hatefulness over methods here...every horse is different. I had one filly refuse to halter break who threw fits worse than those other pictures....everyone else was a peice of cake.

[ 06-10-2007, 03:55 AM: Message edited by: Trinity ]

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I have to agree with leoned it takes time and patience to break a horse. My husband and I have done it and grown up around it for as long as we can remember. I have a yearling at home that is the biggest baby in the entire world. I didn't halter break her until she was about 3 or 4 months old and I did what leoned did I took my time and what point she grabbed the halter from me and ran. But I think is has a lot to do with the fact that every since she was about a week old I would play with her. I believe she sees be sort of like a big sister cause she will play tag and hide and go seek with me (which can be frustrating on the days I don't feel like playing). I can lay in the pasture with her my one year old son can sit on her back and she doesn't even move a muscle. But i just basically became her best friend all my horses are like this..have a 32 year old barrel horse that to this day I can lay down with him out in the pasture and he loves to play to tag and hide and go seek. I become my horses best friend instead of his worst nightmare...I see throwing a horse on the ground would scare the crap out of them but that's just my opinion.

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I have to agree with leoned it takes time and patience to break a horse. My husband and I have done it and grown up around it for as long as we can remember. I have a yearling at home that is the biggest baby in the entire world. I didn't halter break her until she was about 3 or 4 months old and I did what leoned did I took my time and what point she grabbed the halter from me and ran. But I think is has a lot to do with the fact that every since she was about a week old I would play with her. I believe she sees be sort of like a big sister cause she will play tag and hide and go seek with me (which can be frustrating on the days I don't feel like playing). I can lay in the pasture with her my one year old son can sit on her back and she doesn't even move a muscle. But i just basically became her best friend all my horses are like this..have a 32 year old barrel horse that to this day I can lay down with him out in the pasture and he loves to play to tag and hide and go seek. I become my horses best friend instead of his worst nightmare...I see throwing a horse on the ground would scare the crap out of them but that's just my opinion.

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I dont understand either Trinity. Poor lakota was just asking a question and her thread was taken over by silly people just wanting to fight. Lakota, you do what you think is the best way to teach you little one. Whatever works for him and you.

My situation is different then yours and I should have stated that fact. My little one has to be taught becuase of the extensive amount of work that is going to be done on her mouth. During this time I dont want haltering and leading to be an issue.

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I dont understand either Trinity. Poor lakota was just asking a question and her thread was taken over by silly people just wanting to fight. Lakota, you do what you think is the best way to teach you little one. Whatever works for him and you.

My situation is different then yours and I should have stated that fact. My little one has to be taught becuase of the extensive amount of work that is going to be done on her mouth. During this time I dont want haltering and leading to be an issue.

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A baby is just that. A baby. [big Grin] I would limit any 'training' to a few mins. Just spend positive time with your baby. Brushing ect but don't let him become pushy or spoiled. You have plenty of time to teach him to lead. [big Grin]

When you do start halterbreaking take leoned's advice. Allot of great info in that post. Horses hate having their heads pulled on. So many behavior problems on the ground and undersaddle start with someone ripping a horses head off with the lead/reins and it just gets worse from there.

quote:

I dont see anything wrong with putting your foal on the ground as long as he/ she has done something bad enough get that nasty of a punishment. My little girl puts herself on the ground most of the time anyways. She will be leading along just fine and then "BOOM' its like a little bomb went off and she flips out and then she falls on the floor.

I think its dumb to wait till a horse is much stronger then you and out weighs you by 250lbs. Work with your babies when they are young so it is not so much of a pain in the neck and so you dont hurt yourself.

[bang Head]

So what happens when the horse outweighs you by 1,000 lbs and has a habit of BOOM flipping over backwards. How safe would it be to saddle train a horse with this behavior?

[ 06-10-2007, 03:23 PM: Message edited by: bella_notte ]

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A baby is just that. A baby. [big Grin] I would limit any 'training' to a few mins. Just spend positive time with your baby. Brushing ect but don't let him become pushy or spoiled. You have plenty of time to teach him to lead. [big Grin]

When you do start halterbreaking take leoned's advice. Allot of great info in that post. Horses hate having their heads pulled on. So many behavior problems on the ground and undersaddle start with someone ripping a horses head off with the lead/reins and it just gets worse from there.

quote:

I dont see anything wrong with putting your foal on the ground as long as he/ she has done something bad enough get that nasty of a punishment. My little girl puts herself on the ground most of the time anyways. She will be leading along just fine and then "BOOM' its like a little bomb went off and she flips out and then she falls on the floor.

I think its dumb to wait till a horse is much stronger then you and out weighs you by 250lbs. Work with your babies when they are young so it is not so much of a pain in the neck and so you dont hurt yourself.

[bang Head]

So what happens when the horse outweighs you by 1,000 lbs and has a habit of BOOM flipping over backwards. How safe would it be to saddle train a horse with this behavior?

[ 06-10-2007, 03:23 PM: Message edited by: bella_notte ]

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I hear you there!!!! It is no fun when a horse flips over on top of you and you end up with broken ribs, punchered lungs and that's on a good note cause I have seen people die from it.

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I hear you there!!!! It is no fun when a horse flips over on top of you and you end up with broken ribs, punchered lungs and that's on a good note cause I have seen people die from it.

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IMHO, the problem with waiting to halter a foal is this:

If a foal is injured and requires doctoring or worse trailering, it bites you in the butt!

Happened to us when our filly was a few months old.

She somehow cut her chest up on the nonclimbing fence surrounding the pasture we had her in.

Had to pay for a farmcall b/c we could not get her haltered let alone in a trailer.

Vet tech had to grab her ear and hold on to control her and this is more tramatic that teaching haltering and leading before it's needed.

Then we had to doctor the wound and spray that aluminum stuff on her. Again, not haltering her bit us in the butt again.

So here's what we did, used the ole approach and retreat method in the roundpen with mom held nearby outside roundpen.

Approach with halter hanging on your arm.

Only retreat when baby stops stands and looks at you.

Do this until foal lets you touch it rubbing the halter all over the foal working from back to front.

When they move, follow until they stop, retreat.

Keep this up working your way to the foals head.

Eventually they will allow the halter, let them wear it building the time it's on. Don't leave it on!

When teaching to lead, we used a buttrope, letting off the gentle pressure after a few steps, rubbing them, then pulling with gentle pressure till they moved forward.

Helps to have someone leading Mom beside you, settles the foal and encourages them to move forward.

Time and patience is the key.

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IMHO, the problem with waiting to halter a foal is this:

If a foal is injured and requires doctoring or worse trailering, it bites you in the butt!

Happened to us when our filly was a few months old.

She somehow cut her chest up on the nonclimbing fence surrounding the pasture we had her in.

Had to pay for a farmcall b/c we could not get her haltered let alone in a trailer.

Vet tech had to grab her ear and hold on to control her and this is more tramatic that teaching haltering and leading before it's needed.

Then we had to doctor the wound and spray that aluminum stuff on her. Again, not haltering her bit us in the butt again.

So here's what we did, used the ole approach and retreat method in the roundpen with mom held nearby outside roundpen.

Approach with halter hanging on your arm.

Only retreat when baby stops stands and looks at you.

Do this until foal lets you touch it rubbing the halter all over the foal working from back to front.

When they move, follow until they stop, retreat.

Keep this up working your way to the foals head.

Eventually they will allow the halter, let them wear it building the time it's on. Don't leave it on!

When teaching to lead, we used a buttrope, letting off the gentle pressure after a few steps, rubbing them, then pulling with gentle pressure till they moved forward.

Helps to have someone leading Mom beside you, settles the foal and encourages them to move forward.

Time and patience is the key.

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I have to disagree with those saying it is stupid to wait to halter.

There are a million things you can do with a foal using a string or rope and teaching them to yield all parts of their body and stand for things like shots and such WITHOUT having a halter on their face.

You'd be surprised how good your bond can be NOT using a halter until they are older.

If you've never tried it,..you can't say it's stupid and doesn't work.

Pat Parelli starts all his foals at age 7 months in a halter. Prior to that,..all work is done along side mama,..riding mama,..baby follows,..trailering,..baby follows.Much preparation is done before invading their faces.

You earn their trust,..you can make any vet session a good one.

You just have to know other options besides restraint of the face.

Just because it's different,..doesn't mean it doesn't work!

[Wink]

Shelley

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I have to disagree with those saying it is stupid to wait to halter.

There are a million things you can do with a foal using a string or rope and teaching them to yield all parts of their body and stand for things like shots and such WITHOUT having a halter on their face.

You'd be surprised how good your bond can be NOT using a halter until they are older.

If you've never tried it,..you can't say it's stupid and doesn't work.

Pat Parelli starts all his foals at age 7 months in a halter. Prior to that,..all work is done along side mama,..riding mama,..baby follows,..trailering,..baby follows.Much preparation is done before invading their faces.

You earn their trust,..you can make any vet session a good one.

You just have to know other options besides restraint of the face.

Just because it's different,..doesn't mean it doesn't work!

[Wink]

Shelley

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And that is the beauty of different methods...they all can work beautifully and turn out wonderful horses...just a different approch. [smile]

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And that is the beauty of different methods...they all can work beautifully and turn out wonderful horses...just a different approch. [smile]

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