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Foal haltering problem...

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Hi All!!

I am having a little problem trying to get a halter on my 2 week old colt.

We had it on him once maybe 4 or 5 days ago. At first he hated it. He ran around tossing his head trying to fling it off at first, he finally accepted it after a while. We took it off and put him and mom back in the stall.

I have not been able to get it back on him since. He is VERY rambunctions and growing rapidly. He is already stronger than I am, and will soon outweigh me. He is also a brat!

It has crossed my mind to run him around in the paddock until he is wore down, and too tired to run away.

Is this a bad idea? Any suggestions?

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Hi All!!

I am having a little problem trying to get a halter on my 2 week old colt.

We had it on him once maybe 4 or 5 days ago. At first he hated it. He ran around tossing his head trying to fling it off at first, he finally accepted it after a while. We took it off and put him and mom back in the stall.

I have not been able to get it back on him since. He is VERY rambunctions and growing rapidly. He is already stronger than I am, and will soon outweigh me. He is also a brat!

It has crossed my mind to run him around in the paddock until he is wore down, and too tired to run away.

Is this a bad idea? Any suggestions?

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i would just slow down a little. take some time just rubbing him with your hands, and with the halter. touch his head alot, play with his forelock and so on.

when i trained mine to halter (they were 8 months at the time) i always haltered them inside the stall. less room for them to run around on, and i like having the option of backing them into a corner.

i would NOT chase him around the pen till he gets to tired to run away. the way i see it, for him to get THAT tired, is putting alot to much pressure on a 2 weeks old foal. besides, it doesnt really teach him anything... a horse that gets to tired to fight, is still going to fight next time...

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i would just slow down a little. take some time just rubbing him with your hands, and with the halter. touch his head alot, play with his forelock and so on.

when i trained mine to halter (they were 8 months at the time) i always haltered them inside the stall. less room for them to run around on, and i like having the option of backing them into a corner.

i would NOT chase him around the pen till he gets to tired to run away. the way i see it, for him to get THAT tired, is putting alot to much pressure on a 2 weeks old foal. besides, it doesnt really teach him anything... a horse that gets to tired to fight, is still going to fight next time...

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I had trouble with haltering my foal for the longest time. I always had to corner her in the stall and put it on her there. I always had to put my arm over her and put in on that way, never could come at her from the front and put it on. Try putting it on and taking it off several times in a row that shows them that it will come back off. My foal is now almost 4 months old and i dont have a bit of trouble putting a halter on her now.

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I had trouble with haltering my foal for the longest time. I always had to corner her in the stall and put it on her there. I always had to put my arm over her and put in on that way, never could come at her from the front and put it on. Try putting it on and taking it off several times in a row that shows them that it will come back off. My foal is now almost 4 months old and i dont have a bit of trouble putting a halter on her now.

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Sawyer had his halter put on within the first 12 hours of birth... By my stepmom. Don't ask me what she did to do it but she did.

Anyway... He would accept the halter being on after he was three weeks or so, but I put it on everyday IN a stall and left it on while his mom ate and then took it off, practicing putting it on and off for a while. I also sacked him out with it rubbing it all over and letting him taste it (he likes to lick things) before we put it on the first time that I did at three weeks of age.

I didn't start leading him til last week though after he learned to yeild to pressure in a rope halter. Nylon halters aren't so great on colts except for getting them on and off. Less feel to them it seems to me.

[ 06-04-2007, 02:58 PM: Message edited by: Brooksie ]

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Sawyer had his halter put on within the first 12 hours of birth... By my stepmom. Don't ask me what she did to do it but she did.

Anyway... He would accept the halter being on after he was three weeks or so, but I put it on everyday IN a stall and left it on while his mom ate and then took it off, practicing putting it on and off for a while. I also sacked him out with it rubbing it all over and letting him taste it (he likes to lick things) before we put it on the first time that I did at three weeks of age.

I didn't start leading him til last week though after he learned to yeild to pressure in a rope halter. Nylon halters aren't so great on colts except for getting them on and off. Less feel to them it seems to me.

[ 06-04-2007, 02:58 PM: Message edited by: Brooksie ]

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Lay him down... This will gentle him and you can start with leading. When he's down, make sure you put your fingers in his mouth and rub his legs down. I like to pat the bottom of their feet much like the shoer would with a hammer. Nip this attitude in the bud or you'll regret it later. You should only have to lay him down once or twice. Have someone with some know-how help, as it's much like putting a calf on the ground. If you spend some time veryday you'll find it easier everyday.

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Lay him down... This will gentle him and you can start with leading. When he's down, make sure you put your fingers in his mouth and rub his legs down. I like to pat the bottom of their feet much like the shoer would with a hammer. Nip this attitude in the bud or you'll regret it later. You should only have to lay him down once or twice. Have someone with some know-how help, as it's much like putting a calf on the ground. If you spend some time veryday you'll find it easier everyday.

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Thanks Everyone!

I'll just play with him for now :)The halter can wait..I will just incorporate it into the "mine field of scary things" that I have laid out in the turn out area....He isn't scared of anything, everything is a toy to him.

He already LOVES the water hose. I was out watering the turn out area and he went running back and forth through the water stream. I was LMAO! He is gonna be a HANDFUL!

Thanks again!

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Thanks Everyone!

I'll just play with him for now :)The halter can wait..I will just incorporate it into the "mine field of scary things" that I have laid out in the turn out area....He isn't scared of anything, everything is a toy to him.

He already LOVES the water hose. I was out watering the turn out area and he went running back and forth through the water stream. I was LMAO! He is gonna be a HANDFUL!

Thanks again!

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My husband and I spent a lot of time just hanging out in his stall and in the pasture. We never tried to catch him. He would always come up to us, and then we would reward him with scratches. Then we would have the halter in our hands when he would come up to us we would put it up to his head and let him play with it. About the third time we had it on him and he never wanted us to take it off. We worked on him every day. He got the halter on before he got fed and then when he finished, or mom finished then we would take it off. He is now two months old and we no problems working with him.. The rule is though, that we walk away first! He always follows.. By the way he was a brat. The stud ownwe told us to get him under control fast or we would regret it. Have and be consistent!

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My husband and I spent a lot of time just hanging out in his stall and in the pasture. We never tried to catch him. He would always come up to us, and then we would reward him with scratches. Then we would have the halter in our hands when he would come up to us we would put it up to his head and let him play with it. About the third time we had it on him and he never wanted us to take it off. We worked on him every day. He got the halter on before he got fed and then when he finished, or mom finished then we would take it off. He is now two months old and we no problems working with him.. The rule is though, that we walk away first! He always follows.. By the way he was a brat. The stud ownwe told us to get him under control fast or we would regret it. Have and be consistent!

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ubkjj

That is pretty much the appraoch we are trying now. We ALMOST had the halter on him but he doesn't like his ears or the top of his head touched, so when we go to put it over the top of his head he jerks back.

We're trying....

Thanks!

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ubkjj

That is pretty much the appraoch we are trying now. We ALMOST had the halter on him but he doesn't like his ears or the top of his head touched, so when we go to put it over the top of his head he jerks back.

We're trying....

Thanks!

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Some people may think my methods are different but they are effective for me... I would use an XX super soft ranch rope with a quick release honda (I like the buck brannaman honda and Allies ropes are good and not to expensive) I would first toss a loop on him and get him used to the rope and letting him know there is an end to it this will help him stay for you as well. Work your way up the rope and you can introduce the halter without having to chase him..Watch for the signs and back off if things get a little heated...and start over again..this will reduce tension and frustration for you and him..

I hope this information will help

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Some people may think my methods are different but they are effective for me... I would use an XX super soft ranch rope with a quick release honda (I like the buck brannaman honda and Allies ropes are good and not to expensive) I would first toss a loop on him and get him used to the rope and letting him know there is an end to it this will help him stay for you as well. Work your way up the rope and you can introduce the halter without having to chase him..Watch for the signs and back off if things get a little heated...and start over again..this will reduce tension and frustration for you and him..

I hope this information will help

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quote:

Originally posted by Pamela:

Lay him down... This will gentle him and you can start with leading

absolutely - and if he won't lead, just drag him along the floor for a bit.

there's nothing like positive interaction with humans in the first month of their lives to making sure that you are raising friendly co-opetative horses, is there?

[bang Head][bang Head][bang Head]

sigh.

hang the halter on his nose. let it fall off. lather, rinse repeat. put your arm around his neck. lather, rinse, repeat. can you see where I'm going with this? Work with him for 2 or 3 minutes twice a day. Every day. Always have a positive interaction. Within two weeks he'll have accepted that a halter is like underwear - it goes on when he goes out and comes off when he comes in.

To teach him to lead, make sure he is in a nice safe but largeish enclosure. let him trail a nylon lead rope for a while under you watchful eye. Lather rinse repeat. Then when he has taught himself to give to pressure, pick it up. Gently turn his head towards you. Release as soon as he gives. Just once or twice a day. Then start shadow leading. Pick up the lead - wherever he walks, so do you. He comes forward, you go back. He steps sideways, so do you. Keep a loop in the rope to begin with and drop it immediately if he takes off.

Suddenly you will have a foal who follows you without having to be pulled. This means you already have a horse who is 'light in the bridle'...... invaluable. And all it takes is a little bit of patience.

Set yourself and him up for success. Turn them out in the morning and bring them in at night. Be the hand that feeds. Be the 'good' human - the one who can reach those hard to find spots with scritches - the one with a kind word - the one with the smile and unfailingly good humor - the one who he whinnies to with excitement when he sees you.

Take the time to forge the bond.

Just take the time to raise a productive member of the horse world.

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quote:

Originally posted by Pamela:

Lay him down... This will gentle him and you can start with leading

absolutely - and if he won't lead, just drag him along the floor for a bit.

there's nothing like positive interaction with humans in the first month of their lives to making sure that you are raising friendly co-opetative horses, is there?

[bang Head][bang Head][bang Head]

sigh.

hang the halter on his nose. let it fall off. lather, rinse repeat. put your arm around his neck. lather, rinse, repeat. can you see where I'm going with this? Work with him for 2 or 3 minutes twice a day. Every day. Always have a positive interaction. Within two weeks he'll have accepted that a halter is like underwear - it goes on when he goes out and comes off when he comes in.

To teach him to lead, make sure he is in a nice safe but largeish enclosure. let him trail a nylon lead rope for a while under you watchful eye. Lather rinse repeat. Then when he has taught himself to give to pressure, pick it up. Gently turn his head towards you. Release as soon as he gives. Just once or twice a day. Then start shadow leading. Pick up the lead - wherever he walks, so do you. He comes forward, you go back. He steps sideways, so do you. Keep a loop in the rope to begin with and drop it immediately if he takes off.

Suddenly you will have a foal who follows you without having to be pulled. This means you already have a horse who is 'light in the bridle'...... invaluable. And all it takes is a little bit of patience.

Set yourself and him up for success. Turn them out in the morning and bring them in at night. Be the hand that feeds. Be the 'good' human - the one who can reach those hard to find spots with scritches - the one with a kind word - the one with the smile and unfailingly good humor - the one who he whinnies to with excitement when he sees you.

Take the time to forge the bond.

Just take the time to raise a productive member of the horse world.

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quote:

Originally posted by leoned:

quote:

Originally posted by Pamela:

Lay him down... This will gentle him and you can start with leading

absolutely - and if he won't lead, just drag him along the floor for a bit.


That is what I would do...with a dog. But I don't know, I've seen my mares "alpha roll" thier disobedient colts...wait, that is dogs again. Plus not to mention, not many people know how to throw a horse safely, even a little one. The key is to not get the horse, or more importantly, you hurt.

Now this probably will be taken wrong, but he's just a baby, so don't expect too much. Take what you can get and don't sweat what you can't, just yet. And at two weeks, I don't see this a blatant disrespect. Even at the time that we generally halter our kiddos, I don't take reluctance to an unusual thing as disrespect. It is just them not knowing. I personally don't see a point in haltering a young baby, just for my circumstances, but that is just me, I think. If you feel you need to/want to, go right ahead.

I would make that halter a part of you. Have that somewhere loosely on you at all times when you are playing with him. Pet him with it hooked on your arm. Pet him with it. Once he lets you hang all over him, that is when I would start putting stuff on him. If he is defensive around his ears, work up his neck to putting your ball cap on him. The first pair of yearlings I broke to lead I could put anything on them after a while. I used them as a coat rack, a tack hook, a groom box. I usually put my tools on one colt, while I worked with the other. "Here, hang on to this for me." I put all sorts of stuff on them.

Just be consistent, patient, and don't get mad. You have PLENTY of time(I mean, he's going to be here for quite some time) Make it count. Bonding is another word for trust. You can accomplish a lot when he trusts you.

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quote:

Originally posted by leoned:

quote:

Originally posted by Pamela:

Lay him down... This will gentle him and you can start with leading

absolutely - and if he won't lead, just drag him along the floor for a bit.


That is what I would do...with a dog. But I don't know, I've seen my mares "alpha roll" thier disobedient colts...wait, that is dogs again. Plus not to mention, not many people know how to throw a horse safely, even a little one. The key is to not get the horse, or more importantly, you hurt.

Now this probably will be taken wrong, but he's just a baby, so don't expect too much. Take what you can get and don't sweat what you can't, just yet. And at two weeks, I don't see this a blatant disrespect. Even at the time that we generally halter our kiddos, I don't take reluctance to an unusual thing as disrespect. It is just them not knowing. I personally don't see a point in haltering a young baby, just for my circumstances, but that is just me, I think. If you feel you need to/want to, go right ahead.

I would make that halter a part of you. Have that somewhere loosely on you at all times when you are playing with him. Pet him with it hooked on your arm. Pet him with it. Once he lets you hang all over him, that is when I would start putting stuff on him. If he is defensive around his ears, work up his neck to putting your ball cap on him. The first pair of yearlings I broke to lead I could put anything on them after a while. I used them as a coat rack, a tack hook, a groom box. I usually put my tools on one colt, while I worked with the other. "Here, hang on to this for me." I put all sorts of stuff on them.

Just be consistent, patient, and don't get mad. You have PLENTY of time(I mean, he's going to be here for quite some time) Make it count. Bonding is another word for trust. You can accomplish a lot when he trusts you.

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honestly... if you want to train a 2 weeks old foal, then train him.

if you want to play with him, then leave the halter in the tack room.

people train at different stages. i never halter my foals until they are 8-10 months old (weaning) and it goes pretty smooth. and yes, i do lay them down if it in my opinion is needed. i have never had a problem with them not being "soft in the brindle" but then again... i do not brindle a horse until he is 3-4 YEARS old.

BUT, by laying them down if they fight to much, i have horse who respond great to pressure, see me as their leader, they know where their attention should be and they never even threaten to rear...

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honestly... if you want to train a 2 weeks old foal, then train him.

if you want to play with him, then leave the halter in the tack room.

people train at different stages. i never halter my foals until they are 8-10 months old (weaning) and it goes pretty smooth. and yes, i do lay them down if it in my opinion is needed. i have never had a problem with them not being "soft in the brindle" but then again... i do not brindle a horse until he is 3-4 YEARS old.

BUT, by laying them down if they fight to much, i have horse who respond great to pressure, see me as their leader, they know where their attention should be and they never even threaten to rear...

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I really must remember that sarcasm rarely comes across in print.

What I meant to say was that laying down a two week old foal is the one of the most abusive training tips I have ever heard in my entire life. If you have no other recourse but to lay down a two week old foal because you unable to "train" it any other way then perhaps gineau pigs or goldfish would be better pets.

To the OP - a two week old foal has the attention span of a gnat - that's why you can't "train" them as such. They are also still very fragile, despite appearances, so throwing them down would be mentally detrimental and would have a good chance of being physically harmful.

take your time.

Sjotta - being 'light in the bridle' is a phrase which encompasses more than being in a bridle - but when the time comes for this baby to have a bridle on (at two, or three or four) he will be 'light' in it.

[ 06-09-2007, 08:44 AM: Message edited by: leoned ]

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I really must remember that sarcasm rarely comes across in print.

What I meant to say was that laying down a two week old foal is the one of the most abusive training tips I have ever heard in my entire life. If you have no other recourse but to lay down a two week old foal because you unable to "train" it any other way then perhaps gineau pigs or goldfish would be better pets.

To the OP - a two week old foal has the attention span of a gnat - that's why you can't "train" them as such. They are also still very fragile, despite appearances, so throwing them down would be mentally detrimental and would have a good chance of being physically harmful.

take your time.

Sjotta - being 'light in the bridle' is a phrase which encompasses more than being in a bridle - but when the time comes for this baby to have a bridle on (at two, or three or four) he will be 'light' in it.

[ 06-09-2007, 08:44 AM: Message edited by: leoned ]

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Nobody ever likes what I say (read as-I am too easy on my horses), but here is what I did.

My filly threw herself over the first time I tried haltering her. Freaked me out. Soo, I would halter/tie her mom, and then rub/brush baby with halter in hand. She would see it, touch it, taste it, play with it. When she got comfy with it, I would play a game with her. On the nose, with the words, "Put your nose in", off the nose, repeat, lots of scratching and petting. I also did not push it over her ears at first. Opened it and buckled it.

Ditto to leoned about the attention span. Hence, "a game" with the halter.

She now sticks her nose in when I tell her and I put it on like any horse.

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Nobody ever likes what I say (read as-I am too easy on my horses), but here is what I did.

My filly threw herself over the first time I tried haltering her. Freaked me out. Soo, I would halter/tie her mom, and then rub/brush baby with halter in hand. She would see it, touch it, taste it, play with it. When she got comfy with it, I would play a game with her. On the nose, with the words, "Put your nose in", off the nose, repeat, lots of scratching and petting. I also did not push it over her ears at first. Opened it and buckled it.

Ditto to leoned about the attention span. Hence, "a game" with the halter.

She now sticks her nose in when I tell her and I put it on like any horse.

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I put my foal on the ground to put Medication on a cut. She would not stand still and I wanted to be sure she was getting all the meds she needed. I dont see anything wrong with putting your foal on the ground as long as he/ she has done something bad enough get that nasty of a punishment. My little girl puts herself on the ground most of the time anyways. She will be leading along just fine and then "BOOM' its like a little bomb went off and she flips out and then she falls on the floor. Then she getts back up and leads again and then "BOOM" That bomb goes off again. She leads nice when she wants to but she sometimes like to surprise us. Just keep working on your little one and he will catch on. They are learning so much at this stage of their life. Horse rules and human rules, Thats a lot to take in in the first few weeks of life.

I think its dumb to wait till a horse is much stronger then you and out weighs you by 250lbs. Work with your babies when they are young so it is not so much of a pain in the neck and so you dont hurt yourself.

[ 06-09-2007, 08:10 PM: Message edited by: sweetvelocity ]

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I put my foal on the ground to put Medication on a cut. She would not stand still and I wanted to be sure she was getting all the meds she needed. I dont see anything wrong with putting your foal on the ground as long as he/ she has done something bad enough get that nasty of a punishment. My little girl puts herself on the ground most of the time anyways. She will be leading along just fine and then "BOOM' its like a little bomb went off and she flips out and then she falls on the floor. Then she getts back up and leads again and then "BOOM" That bomb goes off again. She leads nice when she wants to but she sometimes like to surprise us. Just keep working on your little one and he will catch on. They are learning so much at this stage of their life. Horse rules and human rules, Thats a lot to take in in the first few weeks of life.

I think its dumb to wait till a horse is much stronger then you and out weighs you by 250lbs. Work with your babies when they are young so it is not so much of a pain in the neck and so you dont hurt yourself.

[ 06-09-2007, 08:10 PM: Message edited by: sweetvelocity ]

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