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Jonergin

Babysteps for the Herdbound

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I've had Kreole, my 9 y/o OTTB, for a little over a month and in that time she's becoming more and more herdbound.

When I test-rode her she walked happily out of the herd, tacked up and never had an issue with anything I asked her to do. The day after I brought her home I took her out solo for a 2 mile trail ride. Not a problem.

We'd been working daily in my dressage ring, sometimes with our other horse around, sometimes not. She'd been paying attention to me, her only distraction was the herd of cows across the street. She would stop short and stare for a few seconds and then go back to work. So far it seemed like she and I were building a good rapport. Here is where I think I lost my "good leader" position that we were developing. I had to change her out of the bit that she'd been using in the hunter/jumper arena before I got her. She had been showed extensively in a slow twist snaffle. Dressage rules say no way so I changed to just an eggbutt french link. Soon after that she figured out that she could take off at a race-track run and get somewhere before I could get enough leverage to stop her. She never managed to throw me but there were two times that I rode her neck for a few feet before getting my rear back in the saddle. Very embarrassing.

After that she started getting upset in the crossties when our other horse would leave the barn. At first I would just put her back where I had left her if she moved. Then it got to the point where she would stand nicely while I watched but if I turned my back she would throw her head down in the crossties and then run forward. So I got out the "stupid stick" and would give her a little tap when she started swinging her butt around or pushing forward. If she stood quietly for a good few seconds I would give her a treat. I thought we had got over it when she stopped her antics.

Now the fun part. We brought my niece's Appy over in prep for the local saddle club show. They'd never met but they seemed to form a quick acceptance of each other. We kept him in a seperate paddock but at night we spotted them grooming each other over the fence. The Appy had a bit of a problem leaving Kreole's side and soon after she started getting the same way. I tried working them seperate but with only having one riding arena it gets a little hard. 4 days into their friendship we took them to the show. The Appy did fine, groomed and tacked up without a hitch. Kreole did fine until the Appy left for its first class. She threw an absolute fit and continued to do so for the entire 4 hour show. Strangely enough, she behaved like a good show horse when we were in the ring. When brought back to the trailer she would flip out again. She banged her face on the trailer, her legs on the trailer and by the time we tried to load her up again she had traumatized herself enough that she wouldn't load at all. We had to get someone else to load her in their trailer and drop her off at my house.

That night I doctored her bumps and bangs, gave her some bute for the pain. The whole time she was by herself in the barn with me and she was ok. She sought her comfort in me by nuzzling me, talking to me and just wanting to be near me. I thought we were going to be ok. I gave her a few days off because she was obviously sore from the tenseness of stress and banging herself around. A few days ago I went out to ride her with my mom on her horse, everything was fine until my mom decided she was done. Kreole and I had just got warmed up so I kept on riding. She could see the other horse and kept calling to him. I would give her a little bump and try to get her attention back on me. I kept trying and when she would come back to me I would just let her walk on a nice relaxed rein. Then she decided she'd had enough and starting screaming, rearing, spinning and trying to lunge into her race-track run. I disengaged the hindquarters, did circles and the like but never managed to get her attention back on me. She actually started sounding like a leaking balloon. She would hit that first note of a whinney and then hold it for nearly a minute. I set my goal on just getting a few steps of a controlled walk out of her before heading back. It took me another 5 minutes of her dancing, rearing and screaming to get it. Then we faced the barn and headed back, I fought her for a walk the entire route.

Today I brought her in for some fly spray and she had a hissy fit in the cross ties because the other horse left the barn when he realized I wasn't going to feed him. I brought out the "stupid stick" again and managed to get her to act a bit less crazed before I finished up spraying and let her back out.

Sorry for such a long post but I feel its sort of complicated. I just want to know if I'm doing things right or just screwing her up more. She's a good horse, comes when called and leaves the company of the other horse to be with me where ever I go. I'm not scared of her when she freaks out but its hard to get anywhere with re-training when she wont concentrate on what I'm doing.

Thanks all.

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I've had Kreole, my 9 y/o OTTB, for a little over a month and in that time she's becoming more and more herdbound.

When I test-rode her she walked happily out of the herd, tacked up and never had an issue with anything I asked her to do. The day after I brought her home I took her out solo for a 2 mile trail ride. Not a problem.

We'd been working daily in my dressage ring, sometimes with our other horse around, sometimes not. She'd been paying attention to me, her only distraction was the herd of cows across the street. She would stop short and stare for a few seconds and then go back to work. So far it seemed like she and I were building a good rapport. Here is where I think I lost my "good leader" position that we were developing. I had to change her out of the bit that she'd been using in the hunter/jumper arena before I got her. She had been showed extensively in a slow twist snaffle. Dressage rules say no way so I changed to just an eggbutt french link. Soon after that she figured out that she could take off at a race-track run and get somewhere before I could get enough leverage to stop her. She never managed to throw me but there were two times that I rode her neck for a few feet before getting my rear back in the saddle. Very embarrassing.

After that she started getting upset in the crossties when our other horse would leave the barn. At first I would just put her back where I had left her if she moved. Then it got to the point where she would stand nicely while I watched but if I turned my back she would throw her head down in the crossties and then run forward. So I got out the "stupid stick" and would give her a little tap when she started swinging her butt around or pushing forward. If she stood quietly for a good few seconds I would give her a treat. I thought we had got over it when she stopped her antics.

Now the fun part. We brought my niece's Appy over in prep for the local saddle club show. They'd never met but they seemed to form a quick acceptance of each other. We kept him in a seperate paddock but at night we spotted them grooming each other over the fence. The Appy had a bit of a problem leaving Kreole's side and soon after she started getting the same way. I tried working them seperate but with only having one riding arena it gets a little hard. 4 days into their friendship we took them to the show. The Appy did fine, groomed and tacked up without a hitch. Kreole did fine until the Appy left for its first class. She threw an absolute fit and continued to do so for the entire 4 hour show. Strangely enough, she behaved like a good show horse when we were in the ring. When brought back to the trailer she would flip out again. She banged her face on the trailer, her legs on the trailer and by the time we tried to load her up again she had traumatized herself enough that she wouldn't load at all. We had to get someone else to load her in their trailer and drop her off at my house.

That night I doctored her bumps and bangs, gave her some bute for the pain. The whole time she was by herself in the barn with me and she was ok. She sought her comfort in me by nuzzling me, talking to me and just wanting to be near me. I thought we were going to be ok. I gave her a few days off because she was obviously sore from the tenseness of stress and banging herself around. A few days ago I went out to ride her with my mom on her horse, everything was fine until my mom decided she was done. Kreole and I had just got warmed up so I kept on riding. She could see the other horse and kept calling to him. I would give her a little bump and try to get her attention back on me. I kept trying and when she would come back to me I would just let her walk on a nice relaxed rein. Then she decided she'd had enough and starting screaming, rearing, spinning and trying to lunge into her race-track run. I disengaged the hindquarters, did circles and the like but never managed to get her attention back on me. She actually started sounding like a leaking balloon. She would hit that first note of a whinney and then hold it for nearly a minute. I set my goal on just getting a few steps of a controlled walk out of her before heading back. It took me another 5 minutes of her dancing, rearing and screaming to get it. Then we faced the barn and headed back, I fought her for a walk the entire route.

Today I brought her in for some fly spray and she had a hissy fit in the cross ties because the other horse left the barn when he realized I wasn't going to feed him. I brought out the "stupid stick" again and managed to get her to act a bit less crazed before I finished up spraying and let her back out.

Sorry for such a long post but I feel its sort of complicated. I just want to know if I'm doing things right or just screwing her up more. She's a good horse, comes when called and leaves the company of the other horse to be with me where ever I go. I'm not scared of her when she freaks out but its hard to get anywhere with re-training when she wont concentrate on what I'm doing.

Thanks all.

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It is not complicated. It has NOTHING to do with changing her bit.

She is in a new place with a person that has not proven to her that they are the BOSS. She has tested her boundries and you have come up lacking. You have coddled her and 'barely' ridden her when she should have been ridden until she gave in completely and acknowledged that you were boss. You have NEVER gotten her to the point that she completely gave up and she knows it.

Your relationship will get worse and worse until she bullies you into not riding her at all and - heaven forbid - not expecting anything right out of her. She is heading there fast.

You need her respect on the ground and ON HER BACK and you need it thoroughly and quickly.

Why don't you see if her old owner will work with you and her and will help get the two of you back on track. Don't make excuses for her or for yourself. Admit that you have not done a very good job of disciplining her and keeping her riding right. You need someone to teach you to be 'EFFECTIVE'. You don't need to be mean and you don't want to start 'swatting' or 'pecking' on your horse. You need to learn to be effective.

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It is not complicated. It has NOTHING to do with changing her bit.

She is in a new place with a person that has not proven to her that they are the BOSS. She has tested her boundries and you have come up lacking. You have coddled her and 'barely' ridden her when she should have been ridden until she gave in completely and acknowledged that you were boss. You have NEVER gotten her to the point that she completely gave up and she knows it.

Your relationship will get worse and worse until she bullies you into not riding her at all and - heaven forbid - not expecting anything right out of her. She is heading there fast.

You need her respect on the ground and ON HER BACK and you need it thoroughly and quickly.

Why don't you see if her old owner will work with you and her and will help get the two of you back on track. Don't make excuses for her or for yourself. Admit that you have not done a very good job of disciplining her and keeping her riding right. You need someone to teach you to be 'EFFECTIVE'. You don't need to be mean and you don't want to start 'swatting' or 'pecking' on your horse. You need to learn to be effective.

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What exactly is a "stupid stick" and can you describe what you are doing with it? Is the horse tied when you use it?

You must seriously listen to what Cheri has just posted and understand that this is getting worse by the minute and YOU must change. Your horse gave up on you I'm really sorry to put it that way but it was just too much change to fast. When that other new horse arrived, they bonded like sailors in a life boat. Your horse is confused about whether or not you can be an effective leader and he has doubt and is still searching for one. Horses will always test and be keeping an eye out for strenght and confidence.

I would start spending more quality time with your horse in non-work mode. Not to say you are not training, but just change your focus to groundwork and give your new horse a break and let him come to know you better. I don't know what you like to do for groundwork but if it is not in your normal routine then I would strongly suggest you get ahold of a good trainers DVD on the subject and learn some good exercises for controlling your horse with a halter and leadrope.

It really can be fun but I know of many people who don't do it at all.

William (historyrider)

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What exactly is a "stupid stick" and can you describe what you are doing with it? Is the horse tied when you use it?

You must seriously listen to what Cheri has just posted and understand that this is getting worse by the minute and YOU must change. Your horse gave up on you I'm really sorry to put it that way but it was just too much change to fast. When that other new horse arrived, they bonded like sailors in a life boat. Your horse is confused about whether or not you can be an effective leader and he has doubt and is still searching for one. Horses will always test and be keeping an eye out for strenght and confidence.

I would start spending more quality time with your horse in non-work mode. Not to say you are not training, but just change your focus to groundwork and give your new horse a break and let him come to know you better. I don't know what you like to do for groundwork but if it is not in your normal routine then I would strongly suggest you get ahold of a good trainers DVD on the subject and learn some good exercises for controlling your horse with a halter and leadrope.

It really can be fun but I know of many people who don't do it at all.

William (historyrider)

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Ok phew. I'm glad that you both said what you did to me. I was thinking that to myself but needed the nudge to make the bubble burst. Didn't mean to scare you all with my "stupid stick"! Its just a dressage whip that I use to ask her to move her hips or back up with. I'm very gentle with it, I assure you. Think Handy Stick ala Clinton Anderson. I'm glad to say I do have his groundwork dvds. I just hadn't thought she needed them previously. Obviously I was very wrong. I helped train my mom's younger OTTB (ironicly Kreole's half brother) with Clinton's method two years ago. I guess its time to pull them out and jog my memory.

I did make, yet another, change tonight. I put her back into all the tack she had been riding in for the last few years. Twisted snaffle with a loose running martingale. I loose lunged her in our round pen to give her a chance to take stock of what was different. Afterwards I rode her around the round pen (just for safety, it was getting dark) for about 30 minutes. I can't say there was a drastic change but she didn't get silly either. She did her usual shuffling and worrying in the crossties but I worked with her till she stood nicely with her head low and relaxed. I then took her out in halter to cool her out, I made sure I took as many chances as I could to get her out of sight of our other horse. She did ok, a little pushy at times but never lost her head.

I'm going to take her old owner up on her offer to come work out any problems that developed. With Kreole's TB stamina I think working her till she gives up could quite possibly take every rider I know... (LOL) [Razz]

Thanks for the advise so far. Please give more if you think of it. I'll keep you all updated.

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Ok phew. I'm glad that you both said what you did to me. I was thinking that to myself but needed the nudge to make the bubble burst. Didn't mean to scare you all with my "stupid stick"! Its just a dressage whip that I use to ask her to move her hips or back up with. I'm very gentle with it, I assure you. Think Handy Stick ala Clinton Anderson. I'm glad to say I do have his groundwork dvds. I just hadn't thought she needed them previously. Obviously I was very wrong. I helped train my mom's younger OTTB (ironicly Kreole's half brother) with Clinton's method two years ago. I guess its time to pull them out and jog my memory.

I did make, yet another, change tonight. I put her back into all the tack she had been riding in for the last few years. Twisted snaffle with a loose running martingale. I loose lunged her in our round pen to give her a chance to take stock of what was different. Afterwards I rode her around the round pen (just for safety, it was getting dark) for about 30 minutes. I can't say there was a drastic change but she didn't get silly either. She did her usual shuffling and worrying in the crossties but I worked with her till she stood nicely with her head low and relaxed. I then took her out in halter to cool her out, I made sure I took as many chances as I could to get her out of sight of our other horse. She did ok, a little pushy at times but never lost her head.

I'm going to take her old owner up on her offer to come work out any problems that developed. With Kreole's TB stamina I think working her till she gives up could quite possibly take every rider I know... (LOL) [Razz]

Thanks for the advise so far. Please give more if you think of it. I'll keep you all updated.

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I don't often agree with Cheri, but I definitely do this time. She's bang on. [Not Worthy]

I'm glad you are going to be working with the previous owner, to help you get a handle on things. It's a step in the right direction. Keep in mind, this horse is not going to behave for you, as it will for it's previous owner. You have to make yourself behave more like the lead mare in your herd, and that may require you to be a bit more aggressive with your own behavior. Meaning giving this horse more than a little tap with your stupid stick. Your horse is not going to hate you if you do, trust me. [big Grin] Just when you think you got a handle on it, this horse will continue to test you, to see what type of leader you really are. Don't fall into that trap, be the leader at all times.

[ 08-15-2007, 11:04 PM: Message edited by: Mudder ]

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I don't often agree with Cheri, but I definitely do this time. She's bang on. [Not Worthy]

I'm glad you are going to be working with the previous owner, to help you get a handle on things. It's a step in the right direction. Keep in mind, this horse is not going to behave for you, as it will for it's previous owner. You have to make yourself behave more like the lead mare in your herd, and that may require you to be a bit more aggressive with your own behavior. Meaning giving this horse more than a little tap with your stupid stick. Your horse is not going to hate you if you do, trust me. [big Grin] Just when you think you got a handle on it, this horse will continue to test you, to see what type of leader you really are. Don't fall into that trap, be the leader at all times.

[ 08-15-2007, 11:04 PM: Message edited by: Mudder ]

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I'm in tears as I write this today. While I wait for Kreole's old owner to return from her vacation I thought I would get started on a bit of groundwork in the roundpen.

I chose to free lunge her without tack and work on changing directions and stopping. She's your typical tense TB when you start lungeing so I wanted to work on slow, relaxed turns. We were doing great, she was at the point of listening to my vocal and body language cues. Now, I don't want to blame anyone here.. but our other horse was for some strange reason (this is never done) taken out of the barn and up to the top pasture. I swear we were 10 seconds from ending the session. She started running figure eights towards the gate. I didn't want her doing that because I wasn't sure if she would panic and try to jump it. I asked her to move off at a trot, got three nice cirlces and asked her to slow to a walk. She did. I then made a quarter turn, put my whip in my other hand pointed it half way across the circle from her, pointed my guiding hand in the way I wanted her to turn and asked for it. Instead she charged past my whip and threw herself into the gate of the roundpen. She got one leg stuck in the poles and smashed her back legs into the lower poles. She nearly fell over backwards. She freed herself and took off going around the pen in a panic. I had dropped my whip by then and was calmly calling to her, putting my hands out in treat fashion to try to get her to come to me. She had cuts and an obvious limp on her left front leg. She wouldn't come. I went into a passive stance, hands limp at my sides, head down. Nothing. I sat down on the ground and made myself little to try and get her curiousity. Nope. Finally I left the round pen thinking that maybe if I just let her calm down a minute that I could try again to catch her. That worked. When I came back she came to me with her head down. I washed her up, gave her some bute, gave her a linament rinse and tended her wounds. 3 legs are cut, but luckily not too deep. I walked her out till she was dry and her limp went away. I called our vet to tell her what had happened and describe her wounds. She said not to worry too much but keep an eye on her front leg.

This is so disheartening. I'm trying so hard. I spend tons of time with her just talking and scratching her itches. I've tried to draw the line with her on being pushy and when she's not worried about the other horse she acts like an angel. I tried to take it back to the basics and she tries to kill herself.

Please, I need a bit of encouragement to hold me over till her old mom comes back.

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I'm in tears as I write this today. While I wait for Kreole's old owner to return from her vacation I thought I would get started on a bit of groundwork in the roundpen.

I chose to free lunge her without tack and work on changing directions and stopping. She's your typical tense TB when you start lungeing so I wanted to work on slow, relaxed turns. We were doing great, she was at the point of listening to my vocal and body language cues. Now, I don't want to blame anyone here.. but our other horse was for some strange reason (this is never done) taken out of the barn and up to the top pasture. I swear we were 10 seconds from ending the session. She started running figure eights towards the gate. I didn't want her doing that because I wasn't sure if she would panic and try to jump it. I asked her to move off at a trot, got three nice cirlces and asked her to slow to a walk. She did. I then made a quarter turn, put my whip in my other hand pointed it half way across the circle from her, pointed my guiding hand in the way I wanted her to turn and asked for it. Instead she charged past my whip and threw herself into the gate of the roundpen. She got one leg stuck in the poles and smashed her back legs into the lower poles. She nearly fell over backwards. She freed herself and took off going around the pen in a panic. I had dropped my whip by then and was calmly calling to her, putting my hands out in treat fashion to try to get her to come to me. She had cuts and an obvious limp on her left front leg. She wouldn't come. I went into a passive stance, hands limp at my sides, head down. Nothing. I sat down on the ground and made myself little to try and get her curiousity. Nope. Finally I left the round pen thinking that maybe if I just let her calm down a minute that I could try again to catch her. That worked. When I came back she came to me with her head down. I washed her up, gave her some bute, gave her a linament rinse and tended her wounds. 3 legs are cut, but luckily not too deep. I walked her out till she was dry and her limp went away. I called our vet to tell her what had happened and describe her wounds. She said not to worry too much but keep an eye on her front leg.

This is so disheartening. I'm trying so hard. I spend tons of time with her just talking and scratching her itches. I've tried to draw the line with her on being pushy and when she's not worried about the other horse she acts like an angel. I tried to take it back to the basics and she tries to kill herself.

Please, I need a bit of encouragement to hold me over till her old mom comes back.

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I wasn't shocked or offended by the use of a "training stick". I love them and strongly suggest you use it as often as neccessary to make your softer cues more significant. You might consider teaching this horse to stand for you while just ground tied and leave the cross ties for a bit. Why I think this could help you is you want the horse to understand he is being asked to stand and standing is a good thing. Tieing him is force really and you are trying to make him stand. He needs to WANT to stand. The way you get this point across is by showing him that if he won't stand still you will make him move more. Each and every time he takes a step you make him take 50 and then offer the stand again. It won't take long for him to realise standing still is his best option. Take your grooming tools into the ring or pasture and at first just keep the lead line over your arm. If the horse stands, great, just groom and rub and make it pleasant. If he moves and won't stand, lunge and back him up, disengage the hindquarters a few laps in each direction then offer the stand again. After a few lessons like this I bet the cross ties won't seem so claustrophobic.

William (historyrider)

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I wasn't shocked or offended by the use of a "training stick". I love them and strongly suggest you use it as often as neccessary to make your softer cues more significant. You might consider teaching this horse to stand for you while just ground tied and leave the cross ties for a bit. Why I think this could help you is you want the horse to understand he is being asked to stand and standing is a good thing. Tieing him is force really and you are trying to make him stand. He needs to WANT to stand. The way you get this point across is by showing him that if he won't stand still you will make him move more. Each and every time he takes a step you make him take 50 and then offer the stand again. It won't take long for him to realise standing still is his best option. Take your grooming tools into the ring or pasture and at first just keep the lead line over your arm. If the horse stands, great, just groom and rub and make it pleasant. If he moves and won't stand, lunge and back him up, disengage the hindquarters a few laps in each direction then offer the stand again. After a few lessons like this I bet the cross ties won't seem so claustrophobic.

William (historyrider)

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Ouch. We must have posted at the same time. Horses will panic. She was just confused so don't be hard on yourself. Setting up your role as a leader for this horse takes time so don't expect any instant results. Time and consistency are your friends and your horse will come around. Try not to tip toe around him now for fear of him "panicing" again. You need him to start to trust you and place you even higher in priority than the other horses.

I watched a submissive horse get the living **** kicked out of him becaue the dominant gelding had him penned in a corner. The sub horse was trying to move but he couldn't get away so the leader just kept kicking him. This black and white attitude is pure horse thinking. You are not moving and I am telling you to move! They are tough and hard on each other. The horse will heal and might be a little spooky about the exercise you were doing when it happened but the sooner you get back to it and get him past it the better. Don't blame yourself for his actions and keep working with him.

William (historyrider)

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Ouch. We must have posted at the same time. Horses will panic. She was just confused so don't be hard on yourself. Setting up your role as a leader for this horse takes time so don't expect any instant results. Time and consistency are your friends and your horse will come around. Try not to tip toe around him now for fear of him "panicing" again. You need him to start to trust you and place you even higher in priority than the other horses.

I watched a submissive horse get the living **** kicked out of him becaue the dominant gelding had him penned in a corner. The sub horse was trying to move but he couldn't get away so the leader just kept kicking him. This black and white attitude is pure horse thinking. You are not moving and I am telling you to move! They are tough and hard on each other. The horse will heal and might be a little spooky about the exercise you were doing when it happened but the sooner you get back to it and get him past it the better. Don't blame yourself for his actions and keep working with him.

William (historyrider)

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As William says it takes time, and there are no instant results. And as I said earlier, just when you think you got a handle on it, you'll find out you still got work ahead of you.

In your case I think you did good for what training level you're at. What I would have done is, when I first began to notice that she's losing her focus on me,(preferably long before she got in panic mode), I would have made a lot more inside turns, quicker and in rapid succession, at the lope. Meaning only allow a half or quarter circle round the pen before asking for the turn. And I'd never turn her at the gate. I'd make her hustle her feet and sweat bullets. I'd give her no time to think of silly things, and I'd use as much force as I needed to, to get the results I wanted. Meaning if I had to introduce her to the end of my whip, then I would. I'm not saying abuse her tho. Sometimes the right thing to do, makes you feel like crap. But it's better than having an out of control horse injure herself and/or you as well.

This has been a learning experience for you and your new horse. You will now have a better idea of how to read her, and your timing will improve toward learning to head things off before they get out of control.

I'm going to suggest that you go to your library and see if they can order you in Clinton Anderson's lunging for respect or his problem solving dvd's. These will show you how to get results while your horse is on a lunge line. Even tho she may be panicking, you will know what to do to remain in control. Get her thinking instead of reacting. My other suggestion is to seek out some professional help, or someone more knowledgeable in horse training. Someone who will work with you and your horse, both separately and together. I think you'll both benefit greatly from it. Hang in there, all is not lost yet. [Huggy]

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As William says it takes time, and there are no instant results. And as I said earlier, just when you think you got a handle on it, you'll find out you still got work ahead of you.

In your case I think you did good for what training level you're at. What I would have done is, when I first began to notice that she's losing her focus on me,(preferably long before she got in panic mode), I would have made a lot more inside turns, quicker and in rapid succession, at the lope. Meaning only allow a half or quarter circle round the pen before asking for the turn. And I'd never turn her at the gate. I'd make her hustle her feet and sweat bullets. I'd give her no time to think of silly things, and I'd use as much force as I needed to, to get the results I wanted. Meaning if I had to introduce her to the end of my whip, then I would. I'm not saying abuse her tho. Sometimes the right thing to do, makes you feel like crap. But it's better than having an out of control horse injure herself and/or you as well.

This has been a learning experience for you and your new horse. You will now have a better idea of how to read her, and your timing will improve toward learning to head things off before they get out of control.

I'm going to suggest that you go to your library and see if they can order you in Clinton Anderson's lunging for respect or his problem solving dvd's. These will show you how to get results while your horse is on a lunge line. Even tho she may be panicking, you will know what to do to remain in control. Get her thinking instead of reacting. My other suggestion is to seek out some professional help, or someone more knowledgeable in horse training. Someone who will work with you and your horse, both separately and together. I think you'll both benefit greatly from it. Hang in there, all is not lost yet. [Huggy]

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