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GreyHorse

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Seems like every one enjoyed the last time I posted about a colt, so I thought I'd do it again.

Hannah and me started this horse 2 yrs ago, so I know her. She has some problems... One being that by nature she is very careless. Bulldozes over stuff, don't watch what she's doing, just kinda assumes that the world will bow to her demands.

The other is that she has an old neck injury, I'm assuming from way back when she was a baby. The muscles just behind the poll are atrophied and the tendons are tight. She has good lateral flexion, but when I started her I never asked for any vertical flexion on account of that neck injury.

The good parts about this mare is that she is dog gentle, willing and sweet. Back then she was also feather light, both to rein and to leg.

Her owner has ridden her at least once a week, in a sale barn. He is a very determined learner, in search of better horsemanship.

I turned her in yesterday w/ my good ole gelding, and I could see that the two of them recognized each other. This morning when I went to get her to saddle, she actively sought to say "Hello", almost letting me know she recognized me too.

As soon as I started the day on her, it took about 45 min and we were right back the same signals I'd used on her 2 yrs ago. How do I know? I use an unusual back up, a slight "pay attention" on the reins and then all leg. She remembered, even tho it was rusty.

As far as her development for 2 yrs... Her owner, like so many that are in the earnest pursuit of horsemanship, has been trying to learn from her. And seeins she's really only got 30 days of professional training on her, she has taken advantage of that.

The first few pens, I'd ask for a turn, and she'd say, "no, no... Are you sure?... I don't think you are using the reins right."

"Aaaaahhh.... I'm pretty sure I'm using the reins right. Matter of fact, I'm pretty sure you ain't responding right."

"Really? But I thought I'm supposed to let you know about stuff like that..."

"No, I really don't wanna hear it. Here, just in case you're still not sure about how to respond, lemme show you w/ my leg."

"Ouch! That wasn't your leg, that was your spur."

"You acted like you couldn't feel that leg."

"I couldn't!"

"Bullsh*t. You swatted that fly. I think my leg is bigger and louder."

We went round and round like that for a little while, and within a few pens she was almost as light as she used to be.

One thing that the owner told me about is that she got hit by a bull last winter and since has been a little bit timid about facing down cattle.

Today just so happened to be a cool day after the rain last nite, and all the cattle were laying down, enjoying the coolness, resting after the heat exhaustion that we've been deealing w/.

The cattle in my pens are pretty well trained to get up and move off a few steps. She got some very good fast confidence in just the first pen when every one just quietly rose and moved away from her. By the time we got half the first alley done, she was sticking her nose down, nudging them to get up. What a cutie.

By the end of the day she was starting to nip them.

She did get spooked once, when I had 3 head in a corner, needed to pull one off. All three stood and looked at her. Very spookey. She buggered a little. But it just so happened that the right one buggered too, and she got to chase him down the alley back into the pen. But when she got back to the corner, and had to move past the two sick ones, she gave me a bugger. I pushed her past them, opened the gate, retrieved the steers, and pushed them towards the hospital, totally ignoring her protests.

"Did you say something?"

"Yeah, that was really scar..."

"Would you open that gate for me?"

"Oh, yeah, I guess I should."

Another thing that was noteworthy about the little mare...

It was pretty sloppy today. And at first she couldn't hardly keep her feet. I thought we were gonna go down a couple of times. Seems like she didn't realize she had three other feet to hold her when one of them slipped. But again, the little mare showed some good heart and found out how to maneuver thru the slop.

She got tired. It was a long day. We didn't get done riding pens till about 1pm (we started at 7am). And I had to push her pretty hard in the last couple of hours. It showed up mostly on opening the gates. Now, gates aren't new to her. But I rode about 50 pens today. Going in and out, she'd have opened 100 gates, plus the ones on the cross alleys. Sidepass a couple of steps to let me get the latch, sidepass back a couple of steps to open it, three steps forward, bend around, then sidepass again to pull it shut, stop to let me close the latch. All of it in the mud.

On a young horse like that I make sure that even pulling a gate is a sidepass. That's very confining, cause the bend of the horse is against the gate.

But the correct way to pull the gate would be a half-pass at the walk, which I think is too hard for a young one like that. I'll introduce it later, along w/ pivoting better to manuever around it.

We pulled a few in the mud, and I found that her left turn is pretty non-existent. The right one is nice, a good solid turnback when I need it. But turn left fast gets me "Whaaaad???"

Thanks to my partner for the day, we got them all pulled anyways.

My thoughts for the day are that this little mare needs to get a lot more solid, so that she can actually teach her owner what he wants to learn. I think that a good neck rein is something I'll want to teach. I'll also want to make her quite a bit more aggressive on cattle, so that she'll forget about spooking from them altogether. I think she'll really enjoy letting her coweyness come out.

Ok... That's the first day in the feedyard. I'll let you know how she comes along.

[ 10-13-2007, 10:08 PM: Message edited by: GreyHorse ]

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Seems like every one enjoyed the last time I posted about a colt, so I thought I'd do it again.

Hannah and me started this horse 2 yrs ago, so I know her. She has some problems... One being that by nature she is very careless. Bulldozes over stuff, don't watch what she's doing, just kinda assumes that the world will bow to her demands.

The other is that she has an old neck injury, I'm assuming from way back when she was a baby. The muscles just behind the poll are atrophied and the tendons are tight. She has good lateral flexion, but when I started her I never asked for any vertical flexion on account of that neck injury.

The good parts about this mare is that she is dog gentle, willing and sweet. Back then she was also feather light, both to rein and to leg.

Her owner has ridden her at least once a week, in a sale barn. He is a very determined learner, in search of better horsemanship.

I turned her in yesterday w/ my good ole gelding, and I could see that the two of them recognized each other. This morning when I went to get her to saddle, she actively sought to say "Hello", almost letting me know she recognized me too.

As soon as I started the day on her, it took about 45 min and we were right back the same signals I'd used on her 2 yrs ago. How do I know? I use an unusual back up, a slight "pay attention" on the reins and then all leg. She remembered, even tho it was rusty.

As far as her development for 2 yrs... Her owner, like so many that are in the earnest pursuit of horsemanship, has been trying to learn from her. And seeins she's really only got 30 days of professional training on her, she has taken advantage of that.

The first few pens, I'd ask for a turn, and she'd say, "no, no... Are you sure?... I don't think you are using the reins right."

"Aaaaahhh.... I'm pretty sure I'm using the reins right. Matter of fact, I'm pretty sure you ain't responding right."

"Really? But I thought I'm supposed to let you know about stuff like that..."

"No, I really don't wanna hear it. Here, just in case you're still not sure about how to respond, lemme show you w/ my leg."

"Ouch! That wasn't your leg, that was your spur."

"You acted like you couldn't feel that leg."

"I couldn't!"

"Bullsh*t. You swatted that fly. I think my leg is bigger and louder."

We went round and round like that for a little while, and within a few pens she was almost as light as she used to be.

One thing that the owner told me about is that she got hit by a bull last winter and since has been a little bit timid about facing down cattle.

Today just so happened to be a cool day after the rain last nite, and all the cattle were laying down, enjoying the coolness, resting after the heat exhaustion that we've been deealing w/.

The cattle in my pens are pretty well trained to get up and move off a few steps. She got some very good fast confidence in just the first pen when every one just quietly rose and moved away from her. By the time we got half the first alley done, she was sticking her nose down, nudging them to get up. What a cutie.

By the end of the day she was starting to nip them.

She did get spooked once, when I had 3 head in a corner, needed to pull one off. All three stood and looked at her. Very spookey. She buggered a little. But it just so happened that the right one buggered too, and she got to chase him down the alley back into the pen. But when she got back to the corner, and had to move past the two sick ones, she gave me a bugger. I pushed her past them, opened the gate, retrieved the steers, and pushed them towards the hospital, totally ignoring her protests.

"Did you say something?"

"Yeah, that was really scar..."

"Would you open that gate for me?"

"Oh, yeah, I guess I should."

Another thing that was noteworthy about the little mare...

It was pretty sloppy today. And at first she couldn't hardly keep her feet. I thought we were gonna go down a couple of times. Seems like she didn't realize she had three other feet to hold her when one of them slipped. But again, the little mare showed some good heart and found out how to maneuver thru the slop.

She got tired. It was a long day. We didn't get done riding pens till about 1pm (we started at 7am). And I had to push her pretty hard in the last couple of hours. It showed up mostly on opening the gates. Now, gates aren't new to her. But I rode about 50 pens today. Going in and out, she'd have opened 100 gates, plus the ones on the cross alleys. Sidepass a couple of steps to let me get the latch, sidepass back a couple of steps to open it, three steps forward, bend around, then sidepass again to pull it shut, stop to let me close the latch. All of it in the mud.

On a young horse like that I make sure that even pulling a gate is a sidepass. That's very confining, cause the bend of the horse is against the gate.

But the correct way to pull the gate would be a half-pass at the walk, which I think is too hard for a young one like that. I'll introduce it later, along w/ pivoting better to manuever around it.

We pulled a few in the mud, and I found that her left turn is pretty non-existent. The right one is nice, a good solid turnback when I need it. But turn left fast gets me "Whaaaad???"

Thanks to my partner for the day, we got them all pulled anyways.

My thoughts for the day are that this little mare needs to get a lot more solid, so that she can actually teach her owner what he wants to learn. I think that a good neck rein is something I'll want to teach. I'll also want to make her quite a bit more aggressive on cattle, so that she'll forget about spooking from them altogether. I think she'll really enjoy letting her coweyness come out.

Ok... That's the first day in the feedyard. I'll let you know how she comes along.

[ 10-13-2007, 10:08 PM: Message edited by: GreyHorse ]

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quote:

Originally posted by GreyHorse:

The first few pens, I'd ask for a turn, and she'd say, "no, no... Are you sure?... I don't think you are using the reins right."

"Aaaaahhh.... I'm pretty sure I'm using the reins right. Matter of fact, I'm pretty sure you ain't responding right."

"Really? But I thought I'm supposed to let you know about stuff like that..."

"No, I really don't wanna hear it. Here, just in case you're still not sure about how to respond, lemme show you w/ my leg."

"Ouch! That wasn't your leg, that was your spur."

"You acted like you couldn't feel that leg."

"I couldn't!"

"Bullsh*t. You swatted that fly. I think my leg is bigger and louder."


[ROTFL][ROTFL]

I can't wait to read more on this horse, it sounds interesting.

Can you explain a little bit more on that backup thing you do? [smiley Wavey]

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quote:

Originally posted by GreyHorse:

The first few pens, I'd ask for a turn, and she'd say, "no, no... Are you sure?... I don't think you are using the reins right."

"Aaaaahhh.... I'm pretty sure I'm using the reins right. Matter of fact, I'm pretty sure you ain't responding right."

"Really? But I thought I'm supposed to let you know about stuff like that..."

"No, I really don't wanna hear it. Here, just in case you're still not sure about how to respond, lemme show you w/ my leg."

"Ouch! That wasn't your leg, that was your spur."

"You acted like you couldn't feel that leg."

"I couldn't!"

"Bullsh*t. You swatted that fly. I think my leg is bigger and louder."


[ROTFL][ROTFL]

I can't wait to read more on this horse, it sounds interesting.

Can you explain a little bit more on that backup thing you do? [smiley Wavey]

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Feathers... You can find the description of that backup on my site. Go to the Online Clinic (in my sig), and then click on the sample Lesson.

The little sorrel mare got rode on two easy days, Monday and Weds. I originally thought I was gonna post once a week, but she really blew my mind yesterday, and I can't wait to brag about her.

We had better than an inch of rain Tues nite, and Weds the pens were knee deep in mud again. I was actually dreading maneuvering her around the slop in safety. But she surprised the heck outta me. She never took a second step. Waltzed around the mud and **** like she's been doing it all her life. Absolutely amazing. What a little horse.

We were shipping yesterday. Now, here at LCF, that is a much slower, calmer process than it was a Brookover. But shipping is shipping... You gotta get'em all out of the pen, and you gotta get them all down the road.

She did fantastic. Caught on to what was going on after the second pen, and then she was ready for whatever would come up.

I tried to help her as much as poss. Instead of riding w/ everyone else to the first bunch, I long trotted her for a warm up, and then set a bunch of gates by ourselves. The other riders caught up w/ us just when we were just getting into the first pen.

And there she run smack dab into her biggest trouble spot... Big cows, looking back at her, trying to run past her.

"Aaaah!!! They're gonna get me!!!"

"Huh?!? What?!? These cows? The ones Looking at you? The ones that are turning and running back now?"

"Oh... Sheesh... Well, I feel stupid now."

"Don't worry, I won't tell anybody."

out of time... Will continue this tonite, tell you all about her kicking (it's a good thing this time) and her newfound left turn.

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Feathers... You can find the description of that backup on my site. Go to the Online Clinic (in my sig), and then click on the sample Lesson.

The little sorrel mare got rode on two easy days, Monday and Weds. I originally thought I was gonna post once a week, but she really blew my mind yesterday, and I can't wait to brag about her.

We had better than an inch of rain Tues nite, and Weds the pens were knee deep in mud again. I was actually dreading maneuvering her around the slop in safety. But she surprised the heck outta me. She never took a second step. Waltzed around the mud and **** like she's been doing it all her life. Absolutely amazing. What a little horse.

We were shipping yesterday. Now, here at LCF, that is a much slower, calmer process than it was a Brookover. But shipping is shipping... You gotta get'em all out of the pen, and you gotta get them all down the road.

She did fantastic. Caught on to what was going on after the second pen, and then she was ready for whatever would come up.

I tried to help her as much as poss. Instead of riding w/ everyone else to the first bunch, I long trotted her for a warm up, and then set a bunch of gates by ourselves. The other riders caught up w/ us just when we were just getting into the first pen.

And there she run smack dab into her biggest trouble spot... Big cows, looking back at her, trying to run past her.

"Aaaah!!! They're gonna get me!!!"

"Huh?!? What?!? These cows? The ones Looking at you? The ones that are turning and running back now?"

"Oh... Sheesh... Well, I feel stupid now."

"Don't worry, I won't tell anybody."

out of time... Will continue this tonite, tell you all about her kicking (it's a good thing this time) and her newfound left turn.

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Awww, thanks, you guys. [Embarrassed]

Said I'd get to her kicking...

Her owner sent me a belated email just after he dropped her off, warning me that she'd kicked at another horse. Ok, we'll deal w/ that as it comes up.

LOL... It came up alright.

Would you believe that cows are curious? I mean, they'll come check anything out... including that pesky penrider that shows up once a day. Most of the time that ain't no problem. But remember, these guys are all just a few months old.

So pair up a curious bovine w/ good feed, good water, lots of energy, nothing to do all day, and a need to play and let off some steam. What you get is a 800lbs calf walking behind your horse. Pretty soon that pesky bugger's got 3 or 4 friends wondering what he's doing. And then you got a bunch of teenager calves thinking about what kind of trouble they can stir up. It never fails, one of them will start bucking and snorting behind you, and if he's really brave, he might even butt your horse.

Extreeeeeemely annoying for someone like me, who frequently rides young horses.

Usually, that means I gotta turn my horse around, and bugger the calves away good enough to keep them off my tail. I gotta be able to guide my horse thru the pen safe enough to where I can get a good look at the rest of the critters in there. One of them might be sick.

Now we got this little mare with a history of being intimidated by cows. And sure enough, the first day, we run into one of them pens. Calves are all fat and happy, looking to stir up some ****. And my new little horse is wondering if she just woke up in the twilight zone.

She sees the calves behind us, and buggers forward.

Well, that is THE wrongest thing she can do. They just get bolder if they can make you run.

So I talk her thru staying at a walk, get a quick look around, and get to the next pen.

A few pens later, another pen of hoodlums.

I move a few of them around, suspicious of one being sick, think he'll be ok for now, check him tomorrow, and ride the rest of the pen. And end up w/ a bunch of punks behind me.

I see her laying her ears back, bugger forward just marginally, hold her in the walk, try to get her to be cool. We get around about 1/2 of the pen, and w/out warning, I feel her kick and hear a solid WHACK.

Bullseye!!!

Course, we don't get bothered again. The lead calf ambles back to the water tank to lick his wounds and brag to his buddies how they should've seen the other guy.

I pet her and tell her she's a good girl.

A little later, we run into another one of those pens. And this time, the little mare don't put up w/ no ****... no sirreee...

Imagine Jet Li, showing off his best jump side kick, HaaKeeYAAAH.

Up in the air w/ her front, loading up the hind, and both barrels smack dab into the face of the lead calf behind us.

Caught me totally by surprise, cranked my newly healed up back out of whack again, but she's a good girl. She's the horse, they are the cows, she's in charge.

But, on account of my back now being out of whack, I can't afford to let her do it again. So the next few pens, where we find those types of calves, I turn her and make her run them off.

Now, like I said, that was the first day. Monday, I still turn her to make her run them off.

Weds, this little mare put 2 and 2 together and come up w/ 4.

She kicks at the calves, but no more of those big keeyah kicks. Just a little whack, and sometimes she just gives them a tail swish or a lifted hind leg.

I gotta tell ya, I'm seriously impressed by how smart she is.

Today (I rode her again today, seeins yesterday was an easy day for her), she stood and drank at the water tank, while the calves came up to check her out. She only lifted a hindleg in a threat when they started chewing on her tail.

There is more hero stories, but my fingers are done, so I'll clue you guys in later. Oh, and BTW... she's never even laid an ear back at another horse yet. And sometimes we end up in really close quarters, getting stuff done.

[ 08-30-2007, 09:58 PM: Message edited by: GreyHorse ]

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Awww, thanks, you guys. [Embarrassed]

Said I'd get to her kicking...

Her owner sent me a belated email just after he dropped her off, warning me that she'd kicked at another horse. Ok, we'll deal w/ that as it comes up.

LOL... It came up alright.

Would you believe that cows are curious? I mean, they'll come check anything out... including that pesky penrider that shows up once a day. Most of the time that ain't no problem. But remember, these guys are all just a few months old.

So pair up a curious bovine w/ good feed, good water, lots of energy, nothing to do all day, and a need to play and let off some steam. What you get is a 800lbs calf walking behind your horse. Pretty soon that pesky bugger's got 3 or 4 friends wondering what he's doing. And then you got a bunch of teenager calves thinking about what kind of trouble they can stir up. It never fails, one of them will start bucking and snorting behind you, and if he's really brave, he might even butt your horse.

Extreeeeeemely annoying for someone like me, who frequently rides young horses.

Usually, that means I gotta turn my horse around, and bugger the calves away good enough to keep them off my tail. I gotta be able to guide my horse thru the pen safe enough to where I can get a good look at the rest of the critters in there. One of them might be sick.

Now we got this little mare with a history of being intimidated by cows. And sure enough, the first day, we run into one of them pens. Calves are all fat and happy, looking to stir up some ****. And my new little horse is wondering if she just woke up in the twilight zone.

She sees the calves behind us, and buggers forward.

Well, that is THE wrongest thing she can do. They just get bolder if they can make you run.

So I talk her thru staying at a walk, get a quick look around, and get to the next pen.

A few pens later, another pen of hoodlums.

I move a few of them around, suspicious of one being sick, think he'll be ok for now, check him tomorrow, and ride the rest of the pen. And end up w/ a bunch of punks behind me.

I see her laying her ears back, bugger forward just marginally, hold her in the walk, try to get her to be cool. We get around about 1/2 of the pen, and w/out warning, I feel her kick and hear a solid WHACK.

Bullseye!!!

Course, we don't get bothered again. The lead calf ambles back to the water tank to lick his wounds and brag to his buddies how they should've seen the other guy.

I pet her and tell her she's a good girl.

A little later, we run into another one of those pens. And this time, the little mare don't put up w/ no ****... no sirreee...

Imagine Jet Li, showing off his best jump side kick, HaaKeeYAAAH.

Up in the air w/ her front, loading up the hind, and both barrels smack dab into the face of the lead calf behind us.

Caught me totally by surprise, cranked my newly healed up back out of whack again, but she's a good girl. She's the horse, they are the cows, she's in charge.

But, on account of my back now being out of whack, I can't afford to let her do it again. So the next few pens, where we find those types of calves, I turn her and make her run them off.

Now, like I said, that was the first day. Monday, I still turn her to make her run them off.

Weds, this little mare put 2 and 2 together and come up w/ 4.

She kicks at the calves, but no more of those big keeyah kicks. Just a little whack, and sometimes she just gives them a tail swish or a lifted hind leg.

I gotta tell ya, I'm seriously impressed by how smart she is.

Today (I rode her again today, seeins yesterday was an easy day for her), she stood and drank at the water tank, while the calves came up to check her out. She only lifted a hindleg in a threat when they started chewing on her tail.

There is more hero stories, but my fingers are done, so I'll clue you guys in later. Oh, and BTW... she's never even laid an ear back at another horse yet. And sometimes we end up in really close quarters, getting stuff done.

[ 08-30-2007, 09:58 PM: Message edited by: GreyHorse ]

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YYYYYYYYYYYYYYEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!

GreyHorse has another "30 Days"!!! I LOVE THESE THINGS!!!!

But seriously! I wanna know. . . WIll you take MY horse??? 30 days with you seems like a good 60 or even 90 with some of the trainers I'VE come across!!! And my fella just needs the spit and polish put on!!! [big Grin] PLEASE!?!?!? I'll even let ya write about him! [Wink]

You are Fabulous! [Not Worthy]

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YYYYYYYYYYYYYYEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!

GreyHorse has another "30 Days"!!! I LOVE THESE THINGS!!!!

But seriously! I wanna know. . . WIll you take MY horse??? 30 days with you seems like a good 60 or even 90 with some of the trainers I'VE come across!!! And my fella just needs the spit and polish put on!!! [big Grin] PLEASE!?!?!? I'll even let ya write about him! [Wink]

You are Fabulous! [Not Worthy]

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Love that last cow part, Greyhorse. Thunder is the kinda horse who remembers every little score he has to settle and settles them. He used to get bullied around a lot, and one day, while out in a paddock with some other horses, got cornered by this little quarter (imagine a big half-draft being cowed down by a little quarter).

Well, the quarter wouldn't let Thunder out of that corner, and Thunder tried everything. And I just decided to let them solve it. Well, he finally got it. Or rather the little quarter did. The little guy turned around and started kicking Thunder, and I guess Thunder figured he'd had enough. Whammo, loads up both barrels and just unleashed the most unholy arse-whoopin' I'd ever seen. He actually lifted the quarter off the ground with his second round (the first one spun the little guy sideways, totally broadside to Thunder), and sent him about five feet.

After that, Thunder didn't have much trouble defending himself. [Wink]

It's really cool to hear stories of other horses learning that they can step up and be brave when they need to.

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Love that last cow part, Greyhorse. Thunder is the kinda horse who remembers every little score he has to settle and settles them. He used to get bullied around a lot, and one day, while out in a paddock with some other horses, got cornered by this little quarter (imagine a big half-draft being cowed down by a little quarter).

Well, the quarter wouldn't let Thunder out of that corner, and Thunder tried everything. And I just decided to let them solve it. Well, he finally got it. Or rather the little quarter did. The little guy turned around and started kicking Thunder, and I guess Thunder figured he'd had enough. Whammo, loads up both barrels and just unleashed the most unholy arse-whoopin' I'd ever seen. He actually lifted the quarter off the ground with his second round (the first one spun the little guy sideways, totally broadside to Thunder), and sent him about five feet.

After that, Thunder didn't have much trouble defending himself. [Wink]

It's really cool to hear stories of other horses learning that they can step up and be brave when they need to.

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Kate and Holly...

I can only take one at a time, having determined to ride at least one of my own at all times. And I can't start colts from scratch right now, got about 5 of those to do after work. That'll take me at least till winter.

Matter of fact, I'm a little burnt out on starting colts, so it'll probly be more like spring afore I get those 5 started. And a friend of mine just asked me to break a whole slew of his next spring. Ah sheesh...

So gimme a little while... I gotta ride this little mare. The owner of this little horse wants to send another one. But that one is just 2, and I'm not really comfy w/ bringing a two yr old to the feedyard. I think they are too young for the amount of work that tends to stack up sometimes. Sides, I think I need to keep her for another month to get her foundation solid enough to where he can learn from her like he'd like to.

Long story short... It'll be a while afore I'll have time for new ones.

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Kate and Holly...

I can only take one at a time, having determined to ride at least one of my own at all times. And I can't start colts from scratch right now, got about 5 of those to do after work. That'll take me at least till winter.

Matter of fact, I'm a little burnt out on starting colts, so it'll probly be more like spring afore I get those 5 started. And a friend of mine just asked me to break a whole slew of his next spring. Ah sheesh...

So gimme a little while... I gotta ride this little mare. The owner of this little horse wants to send another one. But that one is just 2, and I'm not really comfy w/ bringing a two yr old to the feedyard. I think they are too young for the amount of work that tends to stack up sometimes. Sides, I think I need to keep her for another month to get her foundation solid enough to where he can learn from her like he'd like to.

Long story short... It'll be a while afore I'll have time for new ones.

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