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canchasin_gal

soft in the bridle.

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Hi. I was wondering if someone could help me with my horse. He is a 5 year old barrel horse and I am having trouble getting him to be soft in the bridle. I am currently using a short shank mylar comfort snaffle and he is ok in it but I ALWAYS have to use a tie down or I will have quite the ride! lol. I have played with bits and I have noticed that he works more willingly with easy/mild gag bits. I have also noticed that he soesn't do so good with bits with no curb chain. He just doesn't have any control with them. I don't know if I should start useing a running martingale with a twisted snaffle or something but I need help.

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Hi. I was wondering if someone could help me with my horse. He is a 5 year old barrel horse and I am having trouble getting him to be soft in the bridle. I am currently using a short shank mylar comfort snaffle and he is ok in it but I ALWAYS have to use a tie down or I will have quite the ride! lol. I have played with bits and I have noticed that he works more willingly with easy/mild gag bits. I have also noticed that he soesn't do so good with bits with no curb chain. He just doesn't have any control with them. I don't know if I should start useing a running martingale with a twisted snaffle or something but I need help.

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Basically; You don't need a curb at all. Switch him back to a smooth snaffle with no tie down or anything. Just the bridle with a smooth snaffle, and start back at very beginning. For teaching him to be soft in the bridle I would recomend Clinton Anderson's Dvds "Riding With Confidence Series I" and "Lunging for Respect, Stage I and II" That'll get you started. They are expensive, but well worth the price.

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Basically; You don't need a curb at all. Switch him back to a smooth snaffle with no tie down or anything. Just the bridle with a smooth snaffle, and start back at very beginning. For teaching him to be soft in the bridle I would recomend Clinton Anderson's Dvds "Riding With Confidence Series I" and "Lunging for Respect, Stage I and II" That'll get you started. They are expensive, but well worth the price.

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I agree with Equasomo. You need TONS of lateral flexion...done correctly and once you have that down PERFECTLY, move on to vertical flexion. You need to start all of this at a stand still and don't mov eup till the horse gives to the bit everytime.

Lateral flexion....Start on the ground. Stand at your horses side, right at his middle. ising just a halter and lead rope, pull his head around and hold it there till he gives to you...this means he puts slack in the lead rope. If he is real stiff or has never done this, he will try to turn in a circle. Just walk with him and hold hold hold till he stops moving his feet AND gives his head. The INSTANT he gives to you, you give back by completely dropping the rein.

Do that on both sides a LOT before starting under saddle. Same rules apply with him under saddle. At a stand still, pull his head around and wait till his feet stop moving and he gives to the bit (which should only be a smooth snaffle for all this)As soon as he gives or releases pressure on the rein to create slack in it, you let the rein go like it's on fire! QUICK!

When he is KILLER good at this at a stand still...try holding it longer and making him keep his head there longer by giving a slight bump. You can also move up to a walk. Walk him out, then reach down and grab the rein and GENTLY pull his head around....hold till his feet stop moving AND he gives to the bit, then release instantly.

Do this at a trot and a canter too although don't move to a faster speed till he has it down REAL good at the slower speed.

Once you're done with all that, come back and we'll talk vertical flexion! [Wink] Oh, and it should take you a while to achieve all that. Be prepared and take the time if you really want him soft! [big Grin]

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I agree with Equasomo. You need TONS of lateral flexion...done correctly and once you have that down PERFECTLY, move on to vertical flexion. You need to start all of this at a stand still and don't mov eup till the horse gives to the bit everytime.

Lateral flexion....Start on the ground. Stand at your horses side, right at his middle. ising just a halter and lead rope, pull his head around and hold it there till he gives to you...this means he puts slack in the lead rope. If he is real stiff or has never done this, he will try to turn in a circle. Just walk with him and hold hold hold till he stops moving his feet AND gives his head. The INSTANT he gives to you, you give back by completely dropping the rein.

Do that on both sides a LOT before starting under saddle. Same rules apply with him under saddle. At a stand still, pull his head around and wait till his feet stop moving and he gives to the bit (which should only be a smooth snaffle for all this)As soon as he gives or releases pressure on the rein to create slack in it, you let the rein go like it's on fire! QUICK!

When he is KILLER good at this at a stand still...try holding it longer and making him keep his head there longer by giving a slight bump. You can also move up to a walk. Walk him out, then reach down and grab the rein and GENTLY pull his head around....hold till his feet stop moving AND he gives to the bit, then release instantly.

Do this at a trot and a canter too although don't move to a faster speed till he has it down REAL good at the slower speed.

Once you're done with all that, come back and we'll talk vertical flexion! [Wink] Oh, and it should take you a while to achieve all that. Be prepared and take the time if you really want him soft! [big Grin]

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ug! well don't start yelling at me because everytime I ask a question like this and I tell them that I don't have the skill to train a horse like that and we ain't got the $ to send him off, I always get my head bitten off! Like I said. I don't have the skill to train him like that and we don't have the $ to send him to the trainer again. Anyways, I have a very BIG barrel racing show with a lot of money added and I don't think I have the time to take off that much time. I know. I am asking for the quick fix. Don't start yelling at me. I am just a kid asking a question thats all.

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ug! well don't start yelling at me because everytime I ask a question like this and I tell them that I don't have the skill to train a horse like that and we ain't got the $ to send him off, I always get my head bitten off! Like I said. I don't have the skill to train him like that and we don't have the $ to send him to the trainer again. Anyways, I have a very BIG barrel racing show with a lot of money added and I don't think I have the time to take off that much time. I know. I am asking for the quick fix. Don't start yelling at me. I am just a kid asking a question thats all.

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Honey, calm down. YOU asked for the help and I gave a nice reply as to how to fix it. Just cause you didn't likek my answer doesn't mean I was yelling. Shoot, you'd KNOW if i was yellin at ya.

I've been where you are...we all have at one point or another. And you know what? You don't NEED to take all that time OFF from barrel racing. You just need to implement the lateral flexion into your training routine is all. He might come along slower but he'll get there and before you know it, you'll have a nice soft collected enjoyable ride.

And just so you know, there IS no quick fix. But the good news is, lateral flexion is pretty easy to do. I'm SURE you could do it. If you never try something new with your pony, you'll never know what he could have been or done.

Shoot, even Charmayne James does lots of lateral flexion with her horses. Somehow SHE finds time in HER busy barrel racing show schedule to train her horses right. Not sure why you don't think you can. have a little faith in yourself AND your horse. [Wink]

And no, I wasn't yelling. Just trying to talk with you in an adult conversation. If I were yelling it would be in all caps! [big Grin]

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Honey, calm down. YOU asked for the help and I gave a nice reply as to how to fix it. Just cause you didn't likek my answer doesn't mean I was yelling. Shoot, you'd KNOW if i was yellin at ya.

I've been where you are...we all have at one point or another. And you know what? You don't NEED to take all that time OFF from barrel racing. You just need to implement the lateral flexion into your training routine is all. He might come along slower but he'll get there and before you know it, you'll have a nice soft collected enjoyable ride.

And just so you know, there IS no quick fix. But the good news is, lateral flexion is pretty easy to do. I'm SURE you could do it. If you never try something new with your pony, you'll never know what he could have been or done.

Shoot, even Charmayne James does lots of lateral flexion with her horses. Somehow SHE finds time in HER busy barrel racing show schedule to train her horses right. Not sure why you don't think you can. have a little faith in yourself AND your horse. [Wink]

And no, I wasn't yelling. Just trying to talk with you in an adult conversation. If I were yelling it would be in all caps! [big Grin]

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quote:

Originally posted by canchasin_gal:

I don't have the skill to train him like that and we don't have the $ to send him to the trainer again. .

Wait...if you don't have the skill to teach him lateral flexion....darlin, you shouldn't be barrel racin. [Confused]

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quote:

Originally posted by canchasin_gal:

I don't have the skill to train him like that and we don't have the $ to send him to the trainer again. .

Wait...if you don't have the skill to teach him lateral flexion....darlin, you shouldn't be barrel racin. [Confused]

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quote:

Originally posted by canchasin_gal:

ug! well don't start yelling at me because everytime I ask a question like this and I tell them that I don't have the skill to train a horse like that and we ain't got the $ to send him off, I always get my head bitten off! Like I said. I don't have the skill to train him like that and we don't have the $ to send him to the trainer again. Anyways, I have a very BIG barrel racing show with a lot of money added and I don't think I have the time to take off that much time. I know. I am asking for the quick fix. Don't start yelling at me. I am just a kid asking a question thats all.

Yeah...I'm a kid too. I'm 14.

We weren't yelling at you. We were giving you the advice you asked for. The Clinton Anderson dvds make it so you don't have to be an expert. One of his favorite sayings is "It's not rocket science. Completely idiotproof, which means me"

The quick fix is harsher bit. Go ahead. Get the harshest bit you can find and wreck him. (Sarcasm here)

Training a horse TAKES TIME. Since apparently you don't want the work involved, sell your horse and get a deadbroke one that you don't have to work with.

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quote:

Originally posted by canchasin_gal:

ug! well don't start yelling at me because everytime I ask a question like this and I tell them that I don't have the skill to train a horse like that and we ain't got the $ to send him off, I always get my head bitten off! Like I said. I don't have the skill to train him like that and we don't have the $ to send him to the trainer again. Anyways, I have a very BIG barrel racing show with a lot of money added and I don't think I have the time to take off that much time. I know. I am asking for the quick fix. Don't start yelling at me. I am just a kid asking a question thats all.

Yeah...I'm a kid too. I'm 14.

We weren't yelling at you. We were giving you the advice you asked for. The Clinton Anderson dvds make it so you don't have to be an expert. One of his favorite sayings is "It's not rocket science. Completely idiotproof, which means me"

The quick fix is harsher bit. Go ahead. Get the harshest bit you can find and wreck him. (Sarcasm here)

Training a horse TAKES TIME. Since apparently you don't want the work involved, sell your horse and get a deadbroke one that you don't have to work with.

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This isn't yelling, so please don't take it that way. But if you have the bucks to show, but not the time to develop good horsemanship, nor the money, then perhaps your priorities are reversed.

Showing should ALWAYS be secondary to your learning more and more about horsemanship, because in the end, your ability to "put a handle on your horse" as a good horseman actually enables you to WIN bigger purses at these shows, so your entry fees have less and less of a likelihood of going to someone else's pocket.

Even if all you do is take the entry fees from one show, or the price of that "bigger bit," and buy a DVD or a book (I recommend Craig Cameron's book Ride Smart, or Bill Dorrance's True Horsemanship Through Feel), the things you can learn if you really apply yourself to it will increase your chances of winning AND increase your chances of keeping your horse safe, sane and sound.

To recap, as I see it, your choices are learn more today and WIN MORE tomorrow, or learn LITTLE today and WIN LITTLE tomorrow.

For your sake and for your future, I hope you select wisely. You've got a long time to be in the saddle, especially on this pony. Why rush it more than it needs to be rushed?

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This isn't yelling, so please don't take it that way. But if you have the bucks to show, but not the time to develop good horsemanship, nor the money, then perhaps your priorities are reversed.

Showing should ALWAYS be secondary to your learning more and more about horsemanship, because in the end, your ability to "put a handle on your horse" as a good horseman actually enables you to WIN bigger purses at these shows, so your entry fees have less and less of a likelihood of going to someone else's pocket.

Even if all you do is take the entry fees from one show, or the price of that "bigger bit," and buy a DVD or a book (I recommend Craig Cameron's book Ride Smart, or Bill Dorrance's True Horsemanship Through Feel), the things you can learn if you really apply yourself to it will increase your chances of winning AND increase your chances of keeping your horse safe, sane and sound.

To recap, as I see it, your choices are learn more today and WIN MORE tomorrow, or learn LITTLE today and WIN LITTLE tomorrow.

For your sake and for your future, I hope you select wisely. You've got a long time to be in the saddle, especially on this pony. Why rush it more than it needs to be rushed?

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Hi

Well,I'm going to sound like I'm repeating myself

from other posts BUT, if you want softness and lightness in a horse,you need to get that very solid on a horse first before you ever run him at speed ,esp on patterns

You can't have both at the same time.If you don't wish to put this foundation on first,but insist on barrell racing-then I guess you need to ask those that use various harsh bits for control,combined with tie downs to get the job done.You will get control-for now,but not true

lightness.

Your post is one of the reasons I would like to see all youth ride some judged rail and pattern classes (equitation,trail,reinng ) before ever running games

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Hi

Well,I'm going to sound like I'm repeating myself

from other posts BUT, if you want softness and lightness in a horse,you need to get that very solid on a horse first before you ever run him at speed ,esp on patterns

You can't have both at the same time.If you don't wish to put this foundation on first,but insist on barrell racing-then I guess you need to ask those that use various harsh bits for control,combined with tie downs to get the job done.You will get control-for now,but not true

lightness.

Your post is one of the reasons I would like to see all youth ride some judged rail and pattern classes (equitation,trail,reinng ) before ever running games

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Hi canchasin,

I agree with everyone's replies so far. I know it's frustrating to hear "just be patient!" when that's the last thing you want to do. But, unfortunatley, it is the only thing you can do.

To get a horse that is soft in the mouth, pretend he IS soft in the mouth.

For these excercises that have been posted, all you have to do is spend 5 minutes every day standing beside your horse's head. Read over the instructions everyone has posted and try to absorb them. Really, really think about what they are saying, and ask yourself - why will it work?

Trust us, we've all been there and taking that 5 minutes every day REALLY WORKS! And it's soooo rewarding when your horse finally figures out what all the pulling on the rein has been about, and bends his nose to his belly. Talk about a huge grin on your face!! [big Grin]

Good luck, and remember to keep an open mind. Try not to get frustrated, and remember - it is NEVER the horse's fault! Not saying that you've been doing everything wrong, but just keep in mind that there's a reason the horse won't do what you want.

Sorry if I was preaching a bit there. It's been a while since I've been on the boards - it's good to be back [Cool]

Happy Horsing! (and barrel racing!)

Justine

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Hi canchasin,

I agree with everyone's replies so far. I know it's frustrating to hear "just be patient!" when that's the last thing you want to do. But, unfortunatley, it is the only thing you can do.

To get a horse that is soft in the mouth, pretend he IS soft in the mouth.

For these excercises that have been posted, all you have to do is spend 5 minutes every day standing beside your horse's head. Read over the instructions everyone has posted and try to absorb them. Really, really think about what they are saying, and ask yourself - why will it work?

Trust us, we've all been there and taking that 5 minutes every day REALLY WORKS! And it's soooo rewarding when your horse finally figures out what all the pulling on the rein has been about, and bends his nose to his belly. Talk about a huge grin on your face!! [big Grin]

Good luck, and remember to keep an open mind. Try not to get frustrated, and remember - it is NEVER the horse's fault! Not saying that you've been doing everything wrong, but just keep in mind that there's a reason the horse won't do what you want.

Sorry if I was preaching a bit there. It's been a while since I've been on the boards - it's good to be back [Cool]

Happy Horsing! (and barrel racing!)

Justine

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Heya...

I'm a barrel racer too... When I was younger, I was looking for the quick fix too... As a result, I've very nearly ruined Mysty's mouth. At one point, I was really having to pull to get her to run barrels and I'm pulling and it's not that comfortable...

I'm retraining myself to be softer and retraining her. It takes time, but it's proving to be worth it. Our patterns are getting better, cleaner and faster. Our poles are getting better too.

I'm only posting because I've been there. I understand that adrenaline rush when you head down the alley way and your horse is firing and you see that first barrel and in that first turn, you know... You just KNOW that you have it done and won.

And I know that now, 12 years after I started riding Mysty, I'm paying the price for my harsh hands in youth that no one cared to correct me about.

Sometimes the truth hurts, but if you take the time to incorporate just 5 minutes of this flexing stuff in a plain jane old snaffle everyday for two weeks, you'll be amazed at the difference it makes.

And the harsh truth: If you're asking for the fix and it's the long one and you don't want to/ will not do it, then by all means, please sell this horse to someone who'll take the time with him to fix him and find another horse you that fits your riding style and is further along than 5 years old.

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Heya...

I'm a barrel racer too... When I was younger, I was looking for the quick fix too... As a result, I've very nearly ruined Mysty's mouth. At one point, I was really having to pull to get her to run barrels and I'm pulling and it's not that comfortable...

I'm retraining myself to be softer and retraining her. It takes time, but it's proving to be worth it. Our patterns are getting better, cleaner and faster. Our poles are getting better too.

I'm only posting because I've been there. I understand that adrenaline rush when you head down the alley way and your horse is firing and you see that first barrel and in that first turn, you know... You just KNOW that you have it done and won.

And I know that now, 12 years after I started riding Mysty, I'm paying the price for my harsh hands in youth that no one cared to correct me about.

Sometimes the truth hurts, but if you take the time to incorporate just 5 minutes of this flexing stuff in a plain jane old snaffle everyday for two weeks, you'll be amazed at the difference it makes.

And the harsh truth: If you're asking for the fix and it's the long one and you don't want to/ will not do it, then by all means, please sell this horse to someone who'll take the time with him to fix him and find another horse you that fits your riding style and is further along than 5 years old.

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quote:

Originally posted by RollingThunder:

This isn't yelling, so please don't take it that way. But if you have the bucks to show, but not the time to develop good horsemanship, nor the money, then perhaps your priorities are reversed.

Showing should ALWAYS be secondary to your learning more and more about horsemanship, because in the end, your ability to "put a handle on your horse" as a good horseman actually enables you to WIN bigger purses at these shows, so your entry fees have less and less of a likelihood of going to someone else's pocket.

Even if all you do is take the entry fees from one show, or the price of that "bigger bit," and buy a DVD or a book (I recommend Craig Cameron's book Ride Smart, or Bill Dorrance's True Horsemanship Through Feel), the things you can learn if you really apply yourself to it will increase your chances of winning AND increase your chances of keeping your horse safe, sane and sound.

To recap, as I see it, your choices are learn more today and WIN MORE tomorrow, or learn LITTLE today and WIN LITTLE tomorrow.

For your sake and for your future, I hope you select wisely. You've got a long time to be in the saddle, especially on this pony. Why rush it more than it needs to be rushed?

Amen to that..

OP- Don't go to shows if you don't yet have the skill to work and train your horse properly. Your horse is YOUNG(yes, 5yo is very young), he needs consistant work. Not a harsher bit. Definitely not to be run into the ground.

I'm not yelling either, in case your wondering. This IS me being nice.

Training isn't rocket science. Every time you ride your horse he is reading you like a book and learning SOMETHING from you. Whether you are aware of it or not, whether for good or ill, you are training him.

The better a rider you are, the better he learns those lessons your trying to teach him. The more skill you have, the easier those lessons come.

You need to slow down a bit, work on yourself first, because once you fix your skills, chances are he'll come along better than ever. Then work on easing him along a bit faster.

He won't learn to be in any way shape or form SOFT in the bridle.

Harsh bit and soft don't mesh well at all.

P.S. riding a blown up barrel horse is not a fun idea, please don't let this go that far. They can be fixed sometimes, but they remember the bad lessons very well indeed. Don't make a problem when you can prevent it [Frown]

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quote:

Originally posted by RollingThunder:

This isn't yelling, so please don't take it that way. But if you have the bucks to show, but not the time to develop good horsemanship, nor the money, then perhaps your priorities are reversed.

Showing should ALWAYS be secondary to your learning more and more about horsemanship, because in the end, your ability to "put a handle on your horse" as a good horseman actually enables you to WIN bigger purses at these shows, so your entry fees have less and less of a likelihood of going to someone else's pocket.

Even if all you do is take the entry fees from one show, or the price of that "bigger bit," and buy a DVD or a book (I recommend Craig Cameron's book Ride Smart, or Bill Dorrance's True Horsemanship Through Feel), the things you can learn if you really apply yourself to it will increase your chances of winning AND increase your chances of keeping your horse safe, sane and sound.

To recap, as I see it, your choices are learn more today and WIN MORE tomorrow, or learn LITTLE today and WIN LITTLE tomorrow.

For your sake and for your future, I hope you select wisely. You've got a long time to be in the saddle, especially on this pony. Why rush it more than it needs to be rushed?

Amen to that..

OP- Don't go to shows if you don't yet have the skill to work and train your horse properly. Your horse is YOUNG(yes, 5yo is very young), he needs consistant work. Not a harsher bit. Definitely not to be run into the ground.

I'm not yelling either, in case your wondering. This IS me being nice.

Training isn't rocket science. Every time you ride your horse he is reading you like a book and learning SOMETHING from you. Whether you are aware of it or not, whether for good or ill, you are training him.

The better a rider you are, the better he learns those lessons your trying to teach him. The more skill you have, the easier those lessons come.

You need to slow down a bit, work on yourself first, because once you fix your skills, chances are he'll come along better than ever. Then work on easing him along a bit faster.

He won't learn to be in any way shape or form SOFT in the bridle.

Harsh bit and soft don't mesh well at all.

P.S. riding a blown up barrel horse is not a fun idea, please don't let this go that far. They can be fixed sometimes, but they remember the bad lessons very well indeed. Don't make a problem when you can prevent it [Frown]

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Slow down cowgirl. You may have noticed a consistent theme in everyone's advice for you. The reason you are getting these moderate results from your curbed bit is that you are using pain to direct your horse. He's going along with it to save himself but this is not the harmony you are seeking. Right now your horse sounds stiff, braced and you have poor control over him. You seem to be riding him from the mouth back, instead of from the hind quarters forward. The head (reins, bit, your hands) should be for refinement and not your primary communication aid for everything.

I suggest you try this next time. Smooth snaffle, soft rope single loop rein with slobber straps and a small empty arena. Instead of thinking forward, think bend. Start on the ground standing next to your saddle and pick up on a rein. Just hold, don't pull and ask your horse to give to you. Reward the slightest try at first. When he gives you DROP the rein. Ask for a little more each time until you have him willingly and softly coming back to past his shoulder but holding his feet still and being soft. If he moves, go with him but hold the rein. Always release quickly at the correct moment and do this on both sides. Where we release is what we teach and horses learn from the release of pressure, not the application of it. Move to the saddle and work at a stand still on the same exercise until just the picking up of the rein gives you a soft willing response.

I suggest you stay away from loping or any speed work until you can softly perform serpentines and figure 8's without any resistence. Once you are moving be sure your legs are doing their jobs. A leg at the rib cage on the inside of a turn will encourage a horse to bend around it. An outside leg at the girth should ask your horse to move his shoulders over. Don't nag or keep the legs on steady but apply and release as they step. If a soft leg is ignored then a firmer tap, a crop tap or a mild roll of the spur should be the only escalation of aid you need to get the correct response but ALWAYS ask softly first so your horse learns to react to that cue alone. Now when you start riding with your seat and legs correctly, your hands and reins should just help your horse find the best place to keep his head or to serve as a correction if he needs it. Do you best to practice staying out of his mouth and always pick up softly, at first, whenever you wish to communciate through your hands. Then you will need to practice being consistent to help your horse be the partner you are looking for.

Best of luck with it,

William (historyrider)

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Slow down cowgirl. You may have noticed a consistent theme in everyone's advice for you. The reason you are getting these moderate results from your curbed bit is that you are using pain to direct your horse. He's going along with it to save himself but this is not the harmony you are seeking. Right now your horse sounds stiff, braced and you have poor control over him. You seem to be riding him from the mouth back, instead of from the hind quarters forward. The head (reins, bit, your hands) should be for refinement and not your primary communication aid for everything.

I suggest you try this next time. Smooth snaffle, soft rope single loop rein with slobber straps and a small empty arena. Instead of thinking forward, think bend. Start on the ground standing next to your saddle and pick up on a rein. Just hold, don't pull and ask your horse to give to you. Reward the slightest try at first. When he gives you DROP the rein. Ask for a little more each time until you have him willingly and softly coming back to past his shoulder but holding his feet still and being soft. If he moves, go with him but hold the rein. Always release quickly at the correct moment and do this on both sides. Where we release is what we teach and horses learn from the release of pressure, not the application of it. Move to the saddle and work at a stand still on the same exercise until just the picking up of the rein gives you a soft willing response.

I suggest you stay away from loping or any speed work until you can softly perform serpentines and figure 8's without any resistence. Once you are moving be sure your legs are doing their jobs. A leg at the rib cage on the inside of a turn will encourage a horse to bend around it. An outside leg at the girth should ask your horse to move his shoulders over. Don't nag or keep the legs on steady but apply and release as they step. If a soft leg is ignored then a firmer tap, a crop tap or a mild roll of the spur should be the only escalation of aid you need to get the correct response but ALWAYS ask softly first so your horse learns to react to that cue alone. Now when you start riding with your seat and legs correctly, your hands and reins should just help your horse find the best place to keep his head or to serve as a correction if he needs it. Do you best to practice staying out of his mouth and always pick up softly, at first, whenever you wish to communciate through your hands. Then you will need to practice being consistent to help your horse be the partner you are looking for.

Best of luck with it,

William (historyrider)

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Time and patience are great, though not quick fixes. Donating entry fees is also a great learning tool.

OP,

When you go showing, go to the winner and ask her how she got there.

Go to the 2nd place finisher and ask her what her training schedule is.

I bet you will notice that there is a recurring theme.

Just sayin'

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Time and patience are great, though not quick fixes. Donating entry fees is also a great learning tool.

OP,

When you go showing, go to the winner and ask her how she got there.

Go to the 2nd place finisher and ask her what her training schedule is.

I bet you will notice that there is a recurring theme.

Just sayin'

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Everyone here is giving you great advice, and trying to teach you how to teach your horse so you can have those championship runs you're after. Please listen to them and try what they are advising.

Most horsemen, regardless of their chosen discipline are more than happy to help someone who wants to learn. I know that to be fact because I couldn't afford a trainer either. All I had to do was ask for help and there was always someone there to give that help.

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Everyone here is giving you great advice, and trying to teach you how to teach your horse so you can have those championship runs you're after. Please listen to them and try what they are advising.

Most horsemen, regardless of their chosen discipline are more than happy to help someone who wants to learn. I know that to be fact because I couldn't afford a trainer either. All I had to do was ask for help and there was always someone there to give that help.

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