Sign in to follow this  
Sorrel1

How often should DMSO be applied?

Recommended Posts

Kola has had some swelling on his front left fetlock, just above the joint, since Wednesday. it looks as though he either kicked something or someone kicked him, as there is some hair missing at the area of swelling. He isn't gimpy on it, I was hosing it and giving him time off from work. Last night I showed the trainer at the barn, she gave me her DMSO gel to use on it. I went and bought my own so I don't use all of hers. How often should it be applied? Thanks! [big Grin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kola has had some swelling on his front left fetlock, just above the joint, since Wednesday. it looks as though he either kicked something or someone kicked him, as there is some hair missing at the area of swelling. He isn't gimpy on it, I was hosing it and giving him time off from work. Last night I showed the trainer at the barn, she gave me her DMSO gel to use on it. I went and bought my own so I don't use all of hers. How often should it be applied? Thanks! [big Grin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, usually for swelling you would put it on once a day for about three days, then give them a day off and continue if it's still swollen. If the hair gets scurfey that's also a sign they need a break. It is irritating to the skin and should be used in moderation.

However, I would be really, really cautious putting it on where there is no hair. Generally we don't do that, or use it if there is broken skin. If possible use it around the swelling and not directly on a patch of bare skin.

Be very careful to use it sparingly, and do not rub it in, as that will cause more hair loss.

I assume you also know of its dangers to humans and will wear gloves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, usually for swelling you would put it on once a day for about three days, then give them a day off and continue if it's still swollen. If the hair gets scurfey that's also a sign they need a break. It is irritating to the skin and should be used in moderation.

However, I would be really, really cautious putting it on where there is no hair. Generally we don't do that, or use it if there is broken skin. If possible use it around the swelling and not directly on a patch of bare skin.

Be very careful to use it sparingly, and do not rub it in, as that will cause more hair loss.

I assume you also know of its dangers to humans and will wear gloves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, picked up a pack of latex gloves when I bought it!

I was just up to the barn, there doesn't seem to be much change since yesterday, hosed it again and applied DMSO gel to the swelling again. He really doesn't care for the stuff when it starts to heat up. Glad he hasn't connected my catching him with what the stuff feels like...yet! [Wink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, picked up a pack of latex gloves when I bought it!

I was just up to the barn, there doesn't seem to be much change since yesterday, hosed it again and applied DMSO gel to the swelling again. He really doesn't care for the stuff when it starts to heat up. Glad he hasn't connected my catching him with what the stuff feels like...yet! [Wink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DMSO is very versatile and can be applied topically, ingested, injected, nebulized, etc. I have been using it since the mid 1970s with superb success throughout the years. In a perfect world, 3 or 4 times a day would be good. Note, that you may want to dilute the 99% pure stuff that can be bought at the tack stores in half to 50% to minimize hygroscopic (water absorbing, i.e. drying) characteristics some times seen on the skin. I mostly applied the 99% stuff and didnt worry about the drying of the skin, but to each his/her own. DMSO is good to make your own herbal medicines with. If you have access to comfrey or other healing herbs, simply place chopped up herb in a mason jar, add DMSO to just above the herb, and let it stand in a warm dark place, covered for 2 weeks. Strain and bottle in dark glass. You now have a superb healing preparation! Paint the hock with it. Comfrey (boneknit), solomon's seal, and other herbs would be an excellent choice. You might also want to look into various counter-irritant leg and hock paints, i.e. Ball's solution. These are very commonly used in the race horse business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DMSO is very versatile and can be applied topically, ingested, injected, nebulized, etc. I have been using it since the mid 1970s with superb success throughout the years. In a perfect world, 3 or 4 times a day would be good. Note, that you may want to dilute the 99% pure stuff that can be bought at the tack stores in half to 50% to minimize hygroscopic (water absorbing, i.e. drying) characteristics some times seen on the skin. I mostly applied the 99% stuff and didnt worry about the drying of the skin, but to each his/her own. DMSO is good to make your own herbal medicines with. If you have access to comfrey or other healing herbs, simply place chopped up herb in a mason jar, add DMSO to just above the herb, and let it stand in a warm dark place, covered for 2 weeks. Strain and bottle in dark glass. You now have a superb healing preparation! Paint the hock with it. Comfrey (boneknit), solomon's seal, and other herbs would be an excellent choice. You might also want to look into various counter-irritant leg and hock paints, i.e. Ball's solution. These are very commonly used in the race horse business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this