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Crazy4Paints

Question about horse feed.

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Ok i have heard about people putting oil and stuff in their horses feed. What oils do you use and how much? Also what are the pros and cons of using oil. A lady the other day was telling me that if i put canola oil in my horses feed that they will gain weight, is this true? My mare is losing weight due to her nursing foal, she is on 24/7 hay plus grain twice a day and plenty of fresh water and salt/mineral block but is still losing weight. Should i add Canola oil to her food? will it hurt the foal if he eats it? how much do i put?

Any and All comments are appreciated!!

Thank you

Amanda

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Ok i have heard about people putting oil and stuff in their horses feed. What oils do you use and how much? Also what are the pros and cons of using oil. A lady the other day was telling me that if i put canola oil in my horses feed that they will gain weight, is this true? My mare is losing weight due to her nursing foal, she is on 24/7 hay plus grain twice a day and plenty of fresh water and salt/mineral block but is still losing weight. Should i add Canola oil to her food? will it hurt the foal if he eats it? how much do i put?

Any and All comments are appreciated!!

Thank you

Amanda

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Canola oil has worked wonders for me, since i had a rescue horse, that was terrible skinny. I put 1/2 c. of oil in his feed and it helped alot. I dont really know about foals i suppose it would not hurt if he has only alittle. I havent heard of any cons yet so can help you there. So just give her 1/4 of cup twice a day in her grain. O yea the oil is pretty much 100% fat so thats why they put weight on from it [big Grin] It also helps make them really shiny!!! Mayb also try putting Rice Bran (oil, pellets, or powder) it has omega 3 and 6 so it also helps put weight on and again help make their coat shiny. they are both relatively cheap!! hope this helps!! [smile]

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Canola oil has worked wonders for me, since i had a rescue horse, that was terrible skinny. I put 1/2 c. of oil in his feed and it helped alot. I dont really know about foals i suppose it would not hurt if he has only alittle. I havent heard of any cons yet so can help you there. So just give her 1/4 of cup twice a day in her grain. O yea the oil is pretty much 100% fat so thats why they put weight on from it [big Grin] It also helps make them really shiny!!! Mayb also try putting Rice Bran (oil, pellets, or powder) it has omega 3 and 6 so it also helps put weight on and again help make their coat shiny. they are both relatively cheap!! hope this helps!! [smile]

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Rather than trying to add oil etc try changing feed to Mare and foal. It is designed for the nursing mare, and is safe when the baby starts to feed on grain. I believe it is a whole ration but don't quote me on that as it has been several years since I have needed to use it.

Redd

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Rather than trying to add oil etc try changing feed to Mare and foal. It is designed for the nursing mare, and is safe when the baby starts to feed on grain. I believe it is a whole ration but don't quote me on that as it has been several years since I have needed to use it.

Redd

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Lactation is a period of substantial physiological stress. The lactating mare?s nutrient needs are greater than those of any other class of horse with the possible exception of the horse in intense training. During this time the mare must recover from the stress of parturition, produce milk and re-breed. The lactating mare has an increased requirement for water, protein, energy, calcium and phosphorus. A normal, healthy mare will produce about 3% of her body weight in milk per day, during the first 3 months of lactation and 2% in late lactation. This means a 1000 lb mare will produce roughly 30 lb of milk per day during early lactation and roughly 20 lb per day during late lactation. Failure to meet the mares? nutrient needs during lactation will have more effect on her body condition than on milk production. However if the nutrient deficiency is extreme, milk production and re-breeding efficiency will both decrease. Most recent research indicates that the composition of the milk produced will not change with dietary change

The 1100 lb lactating mare will consume 2.75% of her body weight in total feed/day, (concentrate and forage). Therefore she will need 30 lb of total daily feed containing 12.5% CP, .45% calcium and .30% phosphorus in the total ration. Energy needs during lactation increase approximately two-fold over maintenance. During lactation, some grain supplementation will be necessary to let the mare produce milk to ensure the foal?s optimum growth. If a good quality legume hay is fed, the protein requirement will most likely be met, but energy will be deficient. Sample concentrate mixes for milking mares are shown below with approximate amounts of grain required to meet the broodmare?s needs when different roughage sources are used.

SAMPLE CONCENTRATE (GRAIN MIX) LACTATING MARE'S

....................1st 3 months > 3 months

.......................% lb/Ton....% lb/Ton

Rolled Oats............44.5/890....48.0/960

Cracked Corn.......... 25.0/500....25.0/500

Wheat Bran.............10.0/200....10.0/200

Soybean Meal...........10.0/200.....7.0/140

Molasses................7.0/140.....7.0/140

Dicalcium Phosphate.....1.0/ 20.......5/ 10

Ground Limestone........1.5/ 30.....1.5/ 30

T.M. Salt.................5/ 10.......5/ 10

Vitamin Premixc...........5/ 10.......5/ 10

......................100.0/2000... 100.0/2000

CP, %..................14.5........13.5

Calcium, %................90..........80

Phosphorus, %.............60..........50

________________________________________________

FEEDING PROGRAM FOR LACTATING MARE'S

Roughage fed / Amt of concentrate needed*

**(lbs x 100lbs body wt = lb per day)

Alfalfa...........(.05).........Balance cal/phos

(or other legume)

Green grass pasture (0.75-1.0)...TM Salt

Mature grass........(1.3-1.5) TM salt

pasture or grass hay

*When concentrate (grain mixes) similar to those listed above are fed.

Hope this will give you some idea of where you should be in fedding a lactating mare.

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Lactation is a period of substantial physiological stress. The lactating mare?s nutrient needs are greater than those of any other class of horse with the possible exception of the horse in intense training. During this time the mare must recover from the stress of parturition, produce milk and re-breed. The lactating mare has an increased requirement for water, protein, energy, calcium and phosphorus. A normal, healthy mare will produce about 3% of her body weight in milk per day, during the first 3 months of lactation and 2% in late lactation. This means a 1000 lb mare will produce roughly 30 lb of milk per day during early lactation and roughly 20 lb per day during late lactation. Failure to meet the mares? nutrient needs during lactation will have more effect on her body condition than on milk production. However if the nutrient deficiency is extreme, milk production and re-breeding efficiency will both decrease. Most recent research indicates that the composition of the milk produced will not change with dietary change

The 1100 lb lactating mare will consume 2.75% of her body weight in total feed/day, (concentrate and forage). Therefore she will need 30 lb of total daily feed containing 12.5% CP, .45% calcium and .30% phosphorus in the total ration. Energy needs during lactation increase approximately two-fold over maintenance. During lactation, some grain supplementation will be necessary to let the mare produce milk to ensure the foal?s optimum growth. If a good quality legume hay is fed, the protein requirement will most likely be met, but energy will be deficient. Sample concentrate mixes for milking mares are shown below with approximate amounts of grain required to meet the broodmare?s needs when different roughage sources are used.

SAMPLE CONCENTRATE (GRAIN MIX) LACTATING MARE'S

....................1st 3 months > 3 months

.......................% lb/Ton....% lb/Ton

Rolled Oats............44.5/890....48.0/960

Cracked Corn.......... 25.0/500....25.0/500

Wheat Bran.............10.0/200....10.0/200

Soybean Meal...........10.0/200.....7.0/140

Molasses................7.0/140.....7.0/140

Dicalcium Phosphate.....1.0/ 20.......5/ 10

Ground Limestone........1.5/ 30.....1.5/ 30

T.M. Salt.................5/ 10.......5/ 10

Vitamin Premixc...........5/ 10.......5/ 10

......................100.0/2000... 100.0/2000

CP, %..................14.5........13.5

Calcium, %................90..........80

Phosphorus, %.............60..........50

________________________________________________

FEEDING PROGRAM FOR LACTATING MARE'S

Roughage fed / Amt of concentrate needed*

**(lbs x 100lbs body wt = lb per day)

Alfalfa...........(.05).........Balance cal/phos

(or other legume)

Green grass pasture (0.75-1.0)...TM Salt

Mature grass........(1.3-1.5) TM salt

pasture or grass hay

*When concentrate (grain mixes) similar to those listed above are fed.

Hope this will give you some idea of where you should be in fedding a lactating mare.

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Or you can be like the lady I work for. She makes her own horse feed and dog feed. Her horse feed is ground corn, ground oats, ground hay, dical, ground limestone, groiund vitamin, a,b,c,d, dry fat, mis it with water and wala, mmm, sounds good dont it. Her dog food is groiund corn, ground hay, ground meat and bone meal, pig fat, dry fat, dical, gound limestone, ground vitamins, and some other stuff, no dog food or horse feed in her room. I dun think you would want to go through all that trouble though.

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Or you can be like the lady I work for. She makes her own horse feed and dog feed. Her horse feed is ground corn, ground oats, ground hay, dical, ground limestone, groiund vitamin, a,b,c,d, dry fat, mis it with water and wala, mmm, sounds good dont it. Her dog food is groiund corn, ground hay, ground meat and bone meal, pig fat, dry fat, dical, gound limestone, ground vitamins, and some other stuff, no dog food or horse feed in her room. I dun think you would want to go through all that trouble though.

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Ole Timer, wow i just realized how much i DON'T know. Can you kinda just tell me what you would feed her and how much LOL. She is about 1100lbs. here are 2 pics of her one before she was bred and the other is now.

-

sorry i couldnt find one that dash wasn't standing in.

-

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Ole Timer, wow i just realized how much i DON'T know. Can you kinda just tell me what you would feed her and how much LOL. She is about 1100lbs. here are 2 pics of her one before she was bred and the other is now.

-

sorry i couldnt find one that dash wasn't standing in.

-

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Fats(oils) are an excellent way to provide weight, energy, and add shine to dull coats.

It is great for putting weight on hardkeepers.

You need to slowly introduce it in the horses diet and fat can be up to 10% of the horses daily diet. Start at a 1/4 cup and work up over a two week period to a cup a day or 1/2 cup in the am and 1/2 cup in the pm. Some horses dont like the taste of oils so you might have to find a fat supplemented feed. There are plenty out there, just ask your local feed dealer.

More on feeding fats go to:

www.thehorse.com/printarticle.aspx?ID=3895

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Fats(oils) are an excellent way to provide weight, energy, and add shine to dull coats.

It is great for putting weight on hardkeepers.

You need to slowly introduce it in the horses diet and fat can be up to 10% of the horses daily diet. Start at a 1/4 cup and work up over a two week period to a cup a day or 1/2 cup in the am and 1/2 cup in the pm. Some horses dont like the taste of oils so you might have to find a fat supplemented feed. There are plenty out there, just ask your local feed dealer.

More on feeding fats go to:

www.thehorse.com/printarticle.aspx?ID=3895

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