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PonyHoney

Do Some Horses Need To Be Shod Even If They're Not Ridden?

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Since moving to a new state where the terrain is different, (hilly, rocky, muddy)I have been having non-stop problems with my horses' feet. Some of you may have read my posts. Two horses right now are walking like they are on glass. After lot's of vet and farrier consultations, it is pointing to sore feet. I've always thought of shoes to prevent a hoof from wearing down. These horses are not being ridden and their hoofs get long between trimmings (I think from all the supplements I've been trying). Will shoes really help? I don't mind shoeing them at all, if that's the case. Are there really horses who just have to have shoes on all the time, even though they're just lounging in the pasture? Sorry for all the posts about this--I'm just in anxiety.

Debi

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Since moving to a new state where the terrain is different, (hilly, rocky, muddy)I have been having non-stop problems with my horses' feet. Some of you may have read my posts. Two horses right now are walking like they are on glass. After lot's of vet and farrier consultations, it is pointing to sore feet. I've always thought of shoes to prevent a hoof from wearing down. These horses are not being ridden and their hoofs get long between trimmings (I think from all the supplements I've been trying). Will shoes really help? I don't mind shoeing them at all, if that's the case. Are there really horses who just have to have shoes on all the time, even though they're just lounging in the pasture? Sorry for all the posts about this--I'm just in anxiety.

Debi

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i have noticed that a lot depends on hoof color...white tend to be softer.my TB has 4 white feet and is ouchy right now,has worn them down...but she is on rest from the track and going in the pool...i prefer to have new swimmers barefoot so they dont rip one off learning to swim.so i have taken to painting her soles everyday with straight venice turpentine...and i paint the coronary band and hoof with a hoof paint i mix...i am trying to toughen the soles while encouraging the foot to grow.she is less sore,i have noticed walking out to the paddock...might work for you.

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i have noticed that a lot depends on hoof color...white tend to be softer.my TB has 4 white feet and is ouchy right now,has worn them down...but she is on rest from the track and going in the pool...i prefer to have new swimmers barefoot so they dont rip one off learning to swim.so i have taken to painting her soles everyday with straight venice turpentine...and i paint the coronary band and hoof with a hoof paint i mix...i am trying to toughen the soles while encouraging the foot to grow.she is less sore,i have noticed walking out to the paddock...might work for you.

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I haven't encountered it very often (a

non-ridden horse needing shoes), but if the feet are sore, the feet are sore.

Sorry, how long has it been since your move? If it's not been long, then they're probably still acclimatising, and it might be worth waiting it out.

But for me, if it's been anything in the order of five months or over, I wouldn't be happy to see them sore, and I'd just go ahead and shoe them.

Good luck.

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I haven't encountered it very often (a

non-ridden horse needing shoes), but if the feet are sore, the feet are sore.

Sorry, how long has it been since your move? If it's not been long, then they're probably still acclimatising, and it might be worth waiting it out.

But for me, if it's been anything in the order of five months or over, I wouldn't be happy to see them sore, and I'd just go ahead and shoe them.

Good luck.

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Yes, some horses require shoes all the time.

I have a mare that road foundered on her front. She MUST have front shoes at all times ridden or not. Her soles are to thin to allow her to go without shoes.

Hoof color has nothing to do with it either. My mare's 1/2 brother had 4 black feet. He could not go without shoes on all 4 feet because his soles were so thin and the feet would chip very badley if left without shoes. My mare has 4 brown feet and she is the same.

The best horse I had for going barefoot were my paints who had 4 white feet. They held up better then many of my other horses.

Much of what contributes to it is genetics. Genetics decide the make up of the foot. My two 1/2 sibs had the same type of feet. My Paints who were not related had a family history of good feet.

When I look at feet after dealing with many different issues and problems I now also look to genetics.

Have you had the feet x-rayed to see what you are dealing with? My mare looks like she has tons of sole (I watch the farrier and he literally does not remove any and she still can not go without shoes because removing even the smallest amount of what is there shoes or no shoes is to much for her paper thin soles) but she really does not and we had to have her feet x-rayed to see just how much was there which was not much. We also had her x-rayed at 8 weeks after being shod and there was very little growth. She's just the type of horse who does not grow enough to protect her.

If you don't mind shoeing them I would at least try front shoes, as most horses have the problem with the front feet.

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Yes, some horses require shoes all the time.

I have a mare that road foundered on her front. She MUST have front shoes at all times ridden or not. Her soles are to thin to allow her to go without shoes.

Hoof color has nothing to do with it either. My mare's 1/2 brother had 4 black feet. He could not go without shoes on all 4 feet because his soles were so thin and the feet would chip very badley if left without shoes. My mare has 4 brown feet and she is the same.

The best horse I had for going barefoot were my paints who had 4 white feet. They held up better then many of my other horses.

Much of what contributes to it is genetics. Genetics decide the make up of the foot. My two 1/2 sibs had the same type of feet. My Paints who were not related had a family history of good feet.

When I look at feet after dealing with many different issues and problems I now also look to genetics.

Have you had the feet x-rayed to see what you are dealing with? My mare looks like she has tons of sole (I watch the farrier and he literally does not remove any and she still can not go without shoes because removing even the smallest amount of what is there shoes or no shoes is to much for her paper thin soles) but she really does not and we had to have her feet x-rayed to see just how much was there which was not much. We also had her x-rayed at 8 weeks after being shod and there was very little growth. She's just the type of horse who does not grow enough to protect her.

If you don't mind shoeing them I would at least try front shoes, as most horses have the problem with the front feet.

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Yes Pony. Especially running bred types. You'll never hear a runnin horse breeder say they're going to a certain stallion because of his great feet.

Shoe your horses ... if you've got one sorer in front than another put a pad on. When I bring racehorses from their world of manicured ground in to the hill & rock country I have them reset in steel ... and sometimes have to add pads just til they heal and toughen a little.

Welcome to my rock world where barefoot generally sucks.

Your horses are likely bruised and will likely abcess. I'd sure shoe them now. If lame on a specific foot, I'd soak it w/Epsom Salts AND paint the sole with a hardener (V. turpentine, like Miss Colt says). I use plain turpentine from the hardware store ... works OK too.

X-rays will tell you just where you're at ... did your vet offer to x-ray their feet? Maybe the ones who don't come LOTS sounder immediately with shoes you could have filmed.

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Yes Pony. Especially running bred types. You'll never hear a runnin horse breeder say they're going to a certain stallion because of his great feet.

Shoe your horses ... if you've got one sorer in front than another put a pad on. When I bring racehorses from their world of manicured ground in to the hill & rock country I have them reset in steel ... and sometimes have to add pads just til they heal and toughen a little.

Welcome to my rock world where barefoot generally sucks.

Your horses are likely bruised and will likely abcess. I'd sure shoe them now. If lame on a specific foot, I'd soak it w/Epsom Salts AND paint the sole with a hardener (V. turpentine, like Miss Colt says). I use plain turpentine from the hardware store ... works OK too.

X-rays will tell you just where you're at ... did your vet offer to x-ray their feet? Maybe the ones who don't come LOTS sounder immediately with shoes you could have filmed.

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Yup.. Depends on the horse.

Utah requires shoes on at all times, regardless of whether I'm riding him or not. Otherwise, he'll just grind them down to stubs and he'll be in severe pain, like he's walking on glass. Doesn't matter what the terrain is like with him..

The Paints need front shoes only.

If your horses are in pain like yours are, I'd put shoes on. Doesn't matter if you ride or not.

As for xrays someone else mentioned.. You really don't need those as you already know what the problem is.

And, hoof color has nothing to do with anything. That's a myth. Just an FYI [smile]

Lisa

[ 08-22-2005, 10:09 AM: Message edited by: LisaX4156 ]

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Yup.. Depends on the horse.

Utah requires shoes on at all times, regardless of whether I'm riding him or not. Otherwise, he'll just grind them down to stubs and he'll be in severe pain, like he's walking on glass. Doesn't matter what the terrain is like with him..

The Paints need front shoes only.

If your horses are in pain like yours are, I'd put shoes on. Doesn't matter if you ride or not.

As for xrays someone else mentioned.. You really don't need those as you already know what the problem is.

And, hoof color has nothing to do with anything. That's a myth. Just an FYI [smile]

Lisa

[ 08-22-2005, 10:09 AM: Message edited by: LisaX4156 ]

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white feet...they wear down easier...ask any good blacksmith on a race track...i have one with 2 white and 2 black...his white feet never get as hard soled as his black feet.blacksmith say he can tell when he has been turned out,his feet dont get packed and painted like when he is in the barn.the white feet are easier to pare out.

as QF has already stated...breed has a lot to do with it.my white footed mare is a TB...i could dig out her soles with a hoof pic [bang Head] at any time.so i paint her soles to toughen them up.

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white feet...they wear down easier...ask any good blacksmith on a race track...i have one with 2 white and 2 black...his white feet never get as hard soled as his black feet.blacksmith say he can tell when he has been turned out,his feet dont get packed and painted like when he is in the barn.the white feet are easier to pare out.

as QF has already stated...breed has a lot to do with it.my white footed mare is a TB...i could dig out her soles with a hoof pic [bang Head] at any time.so i paint her soles to toughen them up.

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White feet / Black feet... I always like this myth. Here is a quick link that I found there are others but I'm a work and really need to get back to it.

http://www.ultimatehorsesite.com/colors/my...ehoofcolor.html

Bottom line the difference between hoof is that in a white their is a lack of color pigment that's it nothing else. Whether there is a preposistion for white feet wearing down faster etc has more to do with genetics. Shoot just about any of our white footed horse have better hoof quality than any of our black footed horses. Most of those need to shod to keep there feet in good condition.

good luck

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White feet / Black feet... I always like this myth. Here is a quick link that I found there are others but I'm a work and really need to get back to it.

http://www.ultimatehorsesite.com/colors/my...ehoofcolor.html

Bottom line the difference between hoof is that in a white their is a lack of color pigment that's it nothing else. Whether there is a preposistion for white feet wearing down faster etc has more to do with genetics. Shoot just about any of our white footed horse have better hoof quality than any of our black footed horses. Most of those need to shod to keep there feet in good condition.

good luck

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I'm glad I'm not the only one going through this. [surrender]

We just pulled the shoes off of 2 of ours 2 weeks ago. One has been barefoot before and she's slowly toughening up. But the other is still having trouble and selectively gimpy--not enough to keep him from rip roaring around the pasture when he wants to.

I've tried the Durasole before and it has helped initially. But I'm not sure if it's one of those things you have to keep using long term or not.

We have one little mare that I never have to trim or anything. She gets trimmed maybe twice a year. They stay the same all the time. But she's not on gravel a lot, just on our slightly rocky pasture. Our two Arabs are barefoot and you can trail ride all day on rocky roads and trails and they're fine.

Why can't they all be like that?!

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Yes, some do. Depends on the horse and circumstances. I have one that if he is not shod his back feet grow crooked, throws his balance off. He had been an Amish road horse when I got him and his shoes had recently been pulled. We let him go barefoot for a while since who knew when the shoes had last been off, but his feet were getting worse and worse. Ended up going to a new farrier (because mine moved) when we got to the point where we figured it was time to try shoes and found out these folks had shod him before and he had always been that way. Needs shoes. I have others that ride on rocky trails and run in rocky pastures and don't have any, or any problem.

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I'm glad I'm not the only one going through this. [surrender]

We just pulled the shoes off of 2 of ours 2 weeks ago. One has been barefoot before and she's slowly toughening up. But the other is still having trouble and selectively gimpy--not enough to keep him from rip roaring around the pasture when he wants to.

I've tried the Durasole before and it has helped initially. But I'm not sure if it's one of those things you have to keep using long term or not.

We have one little mare that I never have to trim or anything. She gets trimmed maybe twice a year. They stay the same all the time. But she's not on gravel a lot, just on our slightly rocky pasture. Our two Arabs are barefoot and you can trail ride all day on rocky roads and trails and they're fine.

Why can't they all be like that?!

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Yes, some do. Depends on the horse and circumstances. I have one that if he is not shod his back feet grow crooked, throws his balance off. He had been an Amish road horse when I got him and his shoes had recently been pulled. We let him go barefoot for a while since who knew when the shoes had last been off, but his feet were getting worse and worse. Ended up going to a new farrier (because mine moved) when we got to the point where we figured it was time to try shoes and found out these folks had shod him before and he had always been that way. Needs shoes. I have others that ride on rocky trails and run in rocky pastures and don't have any, or any problem.

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Its going to take a bit for the barefeet to toughen up.

Yea sometimes horses need to be shod even though noone rides them.

As for supplements, that could be part of what makes your guys ouchy.

Barefoot horses are higher maintance. You have to stay after them, trimming 2-3 weeks apart.

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Its going to take a bit for the barefeet to toughen up.

Yea sometimes horses need to be shod even though noone rides them.

As for supplements, that could be part of what makes your guys ouchy.

Barefoot horses are higher maintance. You have to stay after them, trimming 2-3 weeks apart.

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[Bang Head] im not talking hoof quality.....that i believe depends on the breed...in my experience with race breeds...white feet have a softer sole...and they wear quicker if one loses a shoe.color argument aside....it does sound like shoes may help you until your horses adjust to the terrain where you are.but give the venice turpentine ,,,it would be cheaper than shoeing everyone ans if it doesnt work..then you still have the option to put shoes on.

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[bang Head] im not talking hoof quality.....that i believe depends on the breed...in my experience with race breeds...white feet have a softer sole...and they wear quicker if one loses a shoe.color argument aside....it does sound like shoes may help you until your horses adjust to the terrain where you are.but give the venice turpentine ,,,it would be cheaper than shoeing everyone ans if it doesnt work..then you still have the option to put shoes on.

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quote:

Originally posted by colt:

[bang Head]
im not talking hoof quality.....that i believe depends on the breed...in my experience with race breeds...white feet have a softer sole...and they wear quicker if one loses a shoe.color argument aside....it does sound like shoes may help you until your horses adjust to the terrain where you are.but give the venice turpentine ,,,it would be cheaper than shoeing everyone ans if it doesnt work..then you still have the option to put shoes on.

That's been my experience too, that they tend to be softer than darker hooves.

I agree on trying the turpentine.

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quote:

Originally posted by colt:

[bang Head]
im not talking hoof quality.....that i believe depends on the breed...in my experience with race breeds...white feet have a softer sole...and they wear quicker if one loses a shoe.color argument aside....it does sound like shoes may help you until your horses adjust to the terrain where you are.but give the venice turpentine ,,,it would be cheaper than shoeing everyone ans if it doesnt work..then you still have the option to put shoes on.

That's been my experience too, that they tend to be softer than darker hooves.

I agree on trying the turpentine.

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Cody, a TB with black hooves, has thin soles and virtually nonexistent heels. He must wear shoes at all times, regardless of type of ground or whether or not he is being worked regularly, because his feet hurt if he is barefoot.

Echo, a TB with two black hooves and two white/striped hooves, goes barefoot all the time and has never been ouchy. He will be reshod when he goes back into regular training, but that is to provide support to his now-healed broken leg, not because of any hoof issues.

Steel, a Percheron with white hooves all the way around, has never worn shoes and has never taken a misstep.

Sisco, a Standardbred with light brown hooves, is also barefoot with no issues.

Fame, a mutt horse with two brown hooves and two striped hooves, is also happily barefoot.

I have never heard any validation to the claim that hoof color is an indicator of hoof quality, just as there has never been any legitimate validation to the claim that brunettes are smarter than blondes.

QF is right - if horse is still lame after being shod, films are in order to rule out anything nasty. Good luck.

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Cody, a TB with black hooves, has thin soles and virtually nonexistent heels. He must wear shoes at all times, regardless of type of ground or whether or not he is being worked regularly, because his feet hurt if he is barefoot.

Echo, a TB with two black hooves and two white/striped hooves, goes barefoot all the time and has never been ouchy. He will be reshod when he goes back into regular training, but that is to provide support to his now-healed broken leg, not because of any hoof issues.

Steel, a Percheron with white hooves all the way around, has never worn shoes and has never taken a misstep.

Sisco, a Standardbred with light brown hooves, is also barefoot with no issues.

Fame, a mutt horse with two brown hooves and two striped hooves, is also happily barefoot.

I have never heard any validation to the claim that hoof color is an indicator of hoof quality, just as there has never been any legitimate validation to the claim that brunettes are smarter than blondes.

QF is right - if horse is still lame after being shod, films are in order to rule out anything nasty. Good luck.

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The Hoof Color myth is just that...a myth. It is nothing more than pigment...that would be like saying black skin is different than white skin. It's the same, just merely a different color.

You should educate yourself on bare hooves so you can know what to be looking for. Most farrier's know shod hooves. And they trim bare hooves the way they would trim it if they were putting a shoe on. This will make most horses sore while barefoot. All horses may not need shoes, but all horses DO need proper trimming. Shod or not.

I suspect your new farrier isn't doing something right whether it's removing the calluses or putting them at the wrong angles. Also horses shouldn't be allowed to get long, they should be maintained and trimmed before they get long. If not they will get flaring and this pulls and tears on their laminae...that hurts! Make absolute sure your farrier isn't scraping off the sole giving them no protection, but also not leaving them all lumpy with pressure points.

Check out sites like www.ironfreehoof.com www.tribeequus.com www.equinextion.com and others that will help you recognize a good trim from a bad and what makes a healthy hard bare hoof.

I have two Thoroughbreds (*gasp* race breds! With four white hooves between the two!) that I thought would always need shoes. Due to various reasons my vet and I pulled their shoes and began using a trimmer that specialized in bare hooves. They are more than sound and I live on the edge of the Rocky Mountains. We compete regularly in Jumping and Cross Country. They have rocks all througout their paddocks. That goes for all the barefoot TB/Warmblood broodmares and lesson horses at my boarding stable too. See if you can perhaps find a trimmer that would be more familiar with bare feet rather than shod feet? Worth a try before going and shoeing the horses. [Confused]

[ 08-22-2005, 03:56 PM: Message edited by: UCequest ]

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The Hoof Color myth is just that...a myth. It is nothing more than pigment...that would be like saying black skin is different than white skin. It's the same, just merely a different color.

You should educate yourself on bare hooves so you can know what to be looking for. Most farrier's know shod hooves. And they trim bare hooves the way they would trim it if they were putting a shoe on. This will make most horses sore while barefoot. All horses may not need shoes, but all horses DO need proper trimming. Shod or not.

I suspect your new farrier isn't doing something right whether it's removing the calluses or putting them at the wrong angles. Also horses shouldn't be allowed to get long, they should be maintained and trimmed before they get long. If not they will get flaring and this pulls and tears on their laminae...that hurts! Make absolute sure your farrier isn't scraping off the sole giving them no protection, but also not leaving them all lumpy with pressure points.

Check out sites like www.ironfreehoof.com www.tribeequus.com www.equinextion.com and others that will help you recognize a good trim from a bad and what makes a healthy hard bare hoof.

I have two Thoroughbreds (*gasp* race breds! With four white hooves between the two!) that I thought would always need shoes. Due to various reasons my vet and I pulled their shoes and began using a trimmer that specialized in bare hooves. They are more than sound and I live on the edge of the Rocky Mountains. We compete regularly in Jumping and Cross Country. They have rocks all througout their paddocks. That goes for all the barefoot TB/Warmblood broodmares and lesson horses at my boarding stable too. See if you can perhaps find a trimmer that would be more familiar with bare feet rather than shod feet? Worth a try before going and shoeing the horses. [Confused]

[ 08-22-2005, 03:56 PM: Message edited by: UCequest ]

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