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Vets with poor performance...

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Just had to say, I guess kind of a "warning" thing.

Well two weeks ago Foxy got cut, I'm going to try ot make this short. It was on her leg so we had the vet out (emergency call = big bucks) and he stitched it and wrapped it, put her on antibiotics for five days and came out five days later to change the bandage. Now we left that second bandage on for more than a week, she was going out in mud and everything. We remove the bandage and stitches to find that it's infected and proud-fleshy.

Of course, I now realize I should have changed her bandage way more often, and maybe put on topical antibiotics. But how was I supposed to know that? My vet didn't say SQUAT about anything. Changing the bandage, getting it wet, antibiotics, nothing. [Roll Eyes] So now instead of being able to ride me horse again, I have to go through another...who knows how long of having her bandaged and taking care of her now INFECTED and proud fleshy wound.

Somewhat of a vent...but from now on I'll be asking WAY more questions. I don't care how annoyed they get. It's they're job to keep my horse healthy. Just thought I might want to share so people could learn from my mistakes. ASK QUESTIONS! It's worth it in the long run...

oh and if you were wondering, we are NOT using that vet again. [Mad]

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Just had to say, I guess kind of a "warning" thing.

Well two weeks ago Foxy got cut, I'm going to try ot make this short. It was on her leg so we had the vet out (emergency call = big bucks) and he stitched it and wrapped it, put her on antibiotics for five days and came out five days later to change the bandage. Now we left that second bandage on for more than a week, she was going out in mud and everything. We remove the bandage and stitches to find that it's infected and proud-fleshy.

Of course, I now realize I should have changed her bandage way more often, and maybe put on topical antibiotics. But how was I supposed to know that? My vet didn't say SQUAT about anything. Changing the bandage, getting it wet, antibiotics, nothing. [Roll Eyes] So now instead of being able to ride me horse again, I have to go through another...who knows how long of having her bandaged and taking care of her now INFECTED and proud fleshy wound.

Somewhat of a vent...but from now on I'll be asking WAY more questions. I don't care how annoyed they get. It's they're job to keep my horse healthy. Just thought I might want to share so people could learn from my mistakes. ASK QUESTIONS! It's worth it in the long run...

oh and if you were wondering, we are NOT using that vet again. [Mad]

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Oh, you are sooo right about asking questions. You must do it. It doesn't matter if it is annoying to the vet. It shouldn't be! That's their job! He may have assumed you already knew what to do. However, I think most good vets would have given you more instructions.

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Oh, you are sooo right about asking questions. You must do it. It doesn't matter if it is annoying to the vet. It shouldn't be! That's their job! He may have assumed you already knew what to do. However, I think most good vets would have given you more instructions.

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Elphaba,

Thank you for opening this topic. I'd like to add a few things.

Never be afriad to ask questions about your horses condition, what to ecpect while the horse is healing, what you need to do during the healing process (excercise & bandaging if necessary).

Tell them if you have noticed something in your horses behavior or phycisal condition even if they did not ask you about it.

Always ask the vet to write out instructions for excersice, med doses, bandaging etc...they may assume you already know if you do not ask.

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Elphaba,

Thank you for opening this topic. I'd like to add a few things.

Never be afriad to ask questions about your horses condition, what to ecpect while the horse is healing, what you need to do during the healing process (excercise & bandaging if necessary).

Tell them if you have noticed something in your horses behavior or phycisal condition even if they did not ask you about it.

Always ask the vet to write out instructions for excersice, med doses, bandaging etc...they may assume you already know if you do not ask.

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I got my vet out for my horse when he got an abcess. The stupid vet was a complete ****head.

He was scared of my horse, was scared to pick his **** hoof up, made ME give my horse the needle, now what if I killed my horse, I would have sued that vet.

He new nothing about the climate etc where we live, he's only been here 6 months, so he screwed my horse up some more because he told me to do a few different things and it was all wrong.

He saw my horse was un-happy with the needles, and still told me to give him 2 needles twice a day for a week, I had to pay for the bottle of penacillin, needles, syringes etc.. and a scarrd thigh with a dent in it because my horse got fed up and kicked me, when the stupid vet could have given me powdered penacillin. Which I had to pay an extra $60 for.... GRR! But fortunately he's gone now, and so is my horse, and I got a lovely card in the mail from the vets when I got my boy put down.

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I got my vet out for my horse when he got an abcess. The stupid vet was a complete ****head.

He was scared of my horse, was scared to pick his **** hoof up, made ME give my horse the needle, now what if I killed my horse, I would have sued that vet.

He new nothing about the climate etc where we live, he's only been here 6 months, so he screwed my horse up some more because he told me to do a few different things and it was all wrong.

He saw my horse was un-happy with the needles, and still told me to give him 2 needles twice a day for a week, I had to pay for the bottle of penacillin, needles, syringes etc.. and a scarrd thigh with a dent in it because my horse got fed up and kicked me, when the stupid vet could have given me powdered penacillin. Which I had to pay an extra $60 for.... GRR! But fortunately he's gone now, and so is my horse, and I got a lovely card in the mail from the vets when I got my boy put down.

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Granted the vet should have given you after care instructions, but I'm sorry, it's just common sense to change a bandage more often then once a week. I would have been changing it daily especially if she was out in mud.

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Granted the vet should have given you after care instructions, but I'm sorry, it's just common sense to change a bandage more often then once a week. I would have been changing it daily especially if she was out in mud.

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quote:

Originally posted by tgbbeliever:

Granted the vet should have given you after care instructions, but I'm sorry, it's just common sense to change a bandage more often then once a week. I would have been changing it daily especially if she was out in mud.

[Not Worthy] I was going to say the exact same thing.

When it comes to horse health care, think of it like it was you that was hurt/sick, and do things the way you (or your mom) would do for yourself.

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quote:

Originally posted by tgbbeliever:

Granted the vet should have given you after care instructions, but I'm sorry, it's just common sense to change a bandage more often then once a week. I would have been changing it daily especially if she was out in mud.

[Not Worthy] I was going to say the exact same thing.

When it comes to horse health care, think of it like it was you that was hurt/sick, and do things the way you (or your mom) would do for yourself.

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elphaba- if you can get it wonder dust works awesome for proud flesh! and it will keep the flys out ot the wound!

This thread is the EXACT reason we as horse owners need to understand horse medical care for things that are unfortunatly more often they we would like.

I have a colt right now with 2 very pretty cuts on his leg where he and my other colt let them selves in from the pasture tonight! Dang dorks apparently tried to come through the gate at the same time! [Crazy] Because I have made it my goal to know as much about caring for my kids as I can and thanks to some very patient vets over the years I was able to clean them and treat them without a vet call after hours. If I were to see these as an unknowledge horse owner I would have had a huge vet bill to do just what I did.

We all need to read and ask questions and watch as much as we are able. Heck ask your vet if you can go with them and observe sometime! it will amaze you what you will learn! And when the vet comes out to where your horses are for any reason BE THERE and ASK questions. And a huge thing is.... put together a good first-aid kit! it will save you eventually! A great trick is get some baby dipers and keep them in your trailer and tack room! They make awesome would dressings for bad cuts that are bleeding until the vet can get there!

Use this as a wakeup call and get learning people!!!

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elphaba- if you can get it wonder dust works awesome for proud flesh! and it will keep the flys out ot the wound!

This thread is the EXACT reason we as horse owners need to understand horse medical care for things that are unfortunatly more often they we would like.

I have a colt right now with 2 very pretty cuts on his leg where he and my other colt let them selves in from the pasture tonight! Dang dorks apparently tried to come through the gate at the same time! [Crazy] Because I have made it my goal to know as much about caring for my kids as I can and thanks to some very patient vets over the years I was able to clean them and treat them without a vet call after hours. If I were to see these as an unknowledge horse owner I would have had a huge vet bill to do just what I did.

We all need to read and ask questions and watch as much as we are able. Heck ask your vet if you can go with them and observe sometime! it will amaze you what you will learn! And when the vet comes out to where your horses are for any reason BE THERE and ASK questions. And a huge thing is.... put together a good first-aid kit! it will save you eventually! A great trick is get some baby dipers and keep them in your trailer and tack room! They make awesome would dressings for bad cuts that are bleeding until the vet can get there!

Use this as a wakeup call and get learning people!!!

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There is also nothing wrong with getting a second opinion from some other vet if you ever feel the the advice you have gotten may be slightly off. I have done it more than once and it has saved me major $$$ in the long run!

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There is also nothing wrong with getting a second opinion from some other vet if you ever feel the the advice you have gotten may be slightly off. I have done it more than once and it has saved me major $$$ in the long run!

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Before I worked in veterinary medicine, I thought that all veterinarians were good and loved animals, yada yada a la "All Creatures Great and Small". (please tell me SOMEONE other than me read all the books and watched the TV show!!)

At any rate, they're not. Just like in any other profession, there are excellent veterinarians, mediocre veterinarians, and poor veterinarians. And, unlike small animal programs that have AAHA accreditation and such, large animal facilities/dr's are a tad less regulated.

The other advice was spot-on. You have to do your research, ask around, and when your pet DOES require treatment, you need to find out as much as you can about the problem so you can be part of the solution. If you don't have a good feeling about it, get a second opinion.

HOWEVER...one thing that DOES bug me...when a doctor (veterinarian, human, etc) recommends a course of treatment, we should FOLLOW THROUGH with it!! Unless you're waiting for a second opinion, it is alarming to me how many folks are non-compliant and then turn around and want to blame their doctor/veterinarian. (

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Before I worked in veterinary medicine, I thought that all veterinarians were good and loved animals, yada yada a la "All Creatures Great and Small". (please tell me SOMEONE other than me read all the books and watched the TV show!!)

At any rate, they're not. Just like in any other profession, there are excellent veterinarians, mediocre veterinarians, and poor veterinarians. And, unlike small animal programs that have AAHA accreditation and such, large animal facilities/dr's are a tad less regulated.

The other advice was spot-on. You have to do your research, ask around, and when your pet DOES require treatment, you need to find out as much as you can about the problem so you can be part of the solution. If you don't have a good feeling about it, get a second opinion.

HOWEVER...one thing that DOES bug me...when a doctor (veterinarian, human, etc) recommends a course of treatment, we should FOLLOW THROUGH with it!! Unless you're waiting for a second opinion, it is alarming to me how many folks are non-compliant and then turn around and want to blame their doctor/veterinarian. (

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quote:

Originally posted by BuddyRooShmancyNShy:

At any rate, they're not. Just like in any other profession, there are excellent veterinarians, mediocre veterinarians, and poor veterinarians. (

Yup....I found an excellent vet 6 yrs ago and no matter what barn I move to, I keep using him. Two different barns had converted to using primarily his services by the time I left both. Just goes to show how quickly people realize the difference between their vet and MINE. He's just awesome...can't say enough good things about him.

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quote:

Originally posted by BuddyRooShmancyNShy:

At any rate, they're not. Just like in any other profession, there are excellent veterinarians, mediocre veterinarians, and poor veterinarians. (

Yup....I found an excellent vet 6 yrs ago and no matter what barn I move to, I keep using him. Two different barns had converted to using primarily his services by the time I left both. Just goes to show how quickly people realize the difference between their vet and MINE. He's just awesome...can't say enough good things about him.

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quote:

Originally posted by BuddyRooShmancyNShy:

Before I worked in veterinary medicine, I thought that all veterinarians were good and loved animals, yada yada a la "All Creatures Great and Small". (please tell me SOMEONE other than me read all the books and watched the TV show!!)

(

I watched that show allllll the time.My dad and I are in the process of buying all the seasons on DVD. I also have all the books, some in multiple copies.

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quote:

Originally posted by BuddyRooShmancyNShy:

Before I worked in veterinary medicine, I thought that all veterinarians were good and loved animals, yada yada a la "All Creatures Great and Small". (please tell me SOMEONE other than me read all the books and watched the TV show!!)

(

I watched that show allllll the time.My dad and I are in the process of buying all the seasons on DVD. I also have all the books, some in multiple copies.

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quote:

Originally posted by audrey-mae:

quote:

Originally posted by tgbbeliever:

Granted the vet should have given you after care instructions, but I'm sorry, it's just common sense to change a bandage more often then once a week. I would have been changing it daily especially if she was out in mud.

[Not Worthy]

I was going to say the exact same thing.

When it comes to horse health care, think of it like it was you that was hurt/sick, and do things the way you (or your mom) would do for yourself.

Me to. Thats common sense.

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quote:

Originally posted by audrey-mae:

quote:

Originally posted by tgbbeliever:

Granted the vet should have given you after care instructions, but I'm sorry, it's just common sense to change a bandage more often then once a week. I would have been changing it daily especially if she was out in mud.

[Not Worthy]

I was going to say the exact same thing.

When it comes to horse health care, think of it like it was you that was hurt/sick, and do things the way you (or your mom) would do for yourself.

Me to. Thats common sense.

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Hi to all-

This may be a bit long-I apologize- but you'll understand after you read this. QUESTION everything and let the vet give you a good explaination of what he /she is saying. We had a mare ready to drop her foal. Our 3rd partner is a relative newby to the horse world. When the foal came, he called the vet to come and check her out- the vet said "Oh , she'll be ok-I'll see her in a few days. This idiot ( the vet) didn't ask if the foal was nursing, was standing , was being attended to by the mare- in short didn't want to be bothered. The end result- I opened the stall at 6:00 at night to a dead filly. Undertermined causes was the ruling on her death.

It gets better- the owner of this practice was heard by several people discussing this dead baby at a social function a few days later- his comment-" well , it's not like they are a show barn '. That did it for me!!!!!We didn't count because we do not breed big $ horses- because we are a rescue /rehab barn with a few boarders!!!

I wanted nothing to do with this cluster of fools- but, my partners gave them another chance- get this-

according to another genius at this practice - 1 testicle colts of 20 months are unable to reproduce- we have a beautiful filly as the proof of that statement. I was overruled when I told my partners she was full of it.

The point is that a good vet is worth their weight in gold , but they are hard to find- so ALWAYS question their comments and get 2nd opinions if you have the least little doubt.

It also applies to small animal vets-many of then do not know the different breeds of dogs and their health requirements-ex; GR Pyrenees should only get 1/2 the regular dose of any medicine because of their very slow metabolic rate- a regular dose of some medicines will kill the dog. So be your animal's advocate- learn as much as you can so you can decide if these people really know what they are doing -if it feels wrong to you- don't do it.

Sorry about the length, but it still hurts when I think of that filly.

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Hi to all-

This may be a bit long-I apologize- but you'll understand after you read this. QUESTION everything and let the vet give you a good explaination of what he /she is saying. We had a mare ready to drop her foal. Our 3rd partner is a relative newby to the horse world. When the foal came, he called the vet to come and check her out- the vet said "Oh , she'll be ok-I'll see her in a few days. This idiot ( the vet) didn't ask if the foal was nursing, was standing , was being attended to by the mare- in short didn't want to be bothered. The end result- I opened the stall at 6:00 at night to a dead filly. Undertermined causes was the ruling on her death.

It gets better- the owner of this practice was heard by several people discussing this dead baby at a social function a few days later- his comment-" well , it's not like they are a show barn '. That did it for me!!!!!We didn't count because we do not breed big $ horses- because we are a rescue /rehab barn with a few boarders!!!

I wanted nothing to do with this cluster of fools- but, my partners gave them another chance- get this-

according to another genius at this practice - 1 testicle colts of 20 months are unable to reproduce- we have a beautiful filly as the proof of that statement. I was overruled when I told my partners she was full of it.

The point is that a good vet is worth their weight in gold , but they are hard to find- so ALWAYS question their comments and get 2nd opinions if you have the least little doubt.

It also applies to small animal vets-many of then do not know the different breeds of dogs and their health requirements-ex; GR Pyrenees should only get 1/2 the regular dose of any medicine because of their very slow metabolic rate- a regular dose of some medicines will kill the dog. So be your animal's advocate- learn as much as you can so you can decide if these people really know what they are doing -if it feels wrong to you- don't do it.

Sorry about the length, but it still hurts when I think of that filly.

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I'm definitely a big Herriot fan, but as enjoyable as the series is, it's unrealistic to believe that most vets will give the time that Herriot devoted to each individual case.

When we were trying to save Yasmeen (a little no-luck twice-orphaned filly with strangles), it was incredibly hard to communicate with the vet. As a large-animal practitioner, horses (which are pets), came very low on his list. The vet would show up at the horse field after a full day's worr, and his mind was probably more on dinner than on listening to some know-nothing describe a cleft palate. Having a nasal discharge was expected, and I couldn't get him to understand that *everything* was coming back out of her nostrils. If HC's own vet hadn't listened carefully to what I described, I would never have known. Weeks later when I met him (in a line at the supermarket), and described her symptoms in detail, his only comment was, "well, we would have had to put her down in any case." True, but little comfort.

I guess the moral of all this is that if your vet can't give you his full attention, find another vet.

- Avriel

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I'm definitely a big Herriot fan, but as enjoyable as the series is, it's unrealistic to believe that most vets will give the time that Herriot devoted to each individual case.

When we were trying to save Yasmeen (a little no-luck twice-orphaned filly with strangles), it was incredibly hard to communicate with the vet. As a large-animal practitioner, horses (which are pets), came very low on his list. The vet would show up at the horse field after a full day's worr, and his mind was probably more on dinner than on listening to some know-nothing describe a cleft palate. Having a nasal discharge was expected, and I couldn't get him to understand that *everything* was coming back out of her nostrils. If HC's own vet hadn't listened carefully to what I described, I would never have known. Weeks later when I met him (in a line at the supermarket), and described her symptoms in detail, his only comment was, "well, we would have had to put her down in any case." True, but little comfort.

I guess the moral of all this is that if your vet can't give you his full attention, find another vet.

- Avriel

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Something to chew on folk's!

When you take on horse ownership, for whatever your reasons, YOU take on the "job" of stewardship. You notice, I said "job". How long would you last at your place of employment if you did not learn what your job was and even further, how to perform the task of the job? When you don't understand something that is expected of you, the normal resolve would be to ask questions, study or research it. Then come's the whole idea of common sense! Folk's some thing's are just plain and simple to apply common sense to, without the resources of study. Not to throw stones at anybody in particular, but even being of impaired mind, one would not even consider (well maybe) leaving a baby in a dirty diaper for a week.....would they [Confused]

In these times and with the advent of computers in every home, it is beyond me how far to many stewards of animals, willingly and wantingly, choose to remain clueless. Any responsiblity first starts with oneself...like asking questions when you know there is a lacking of background and information regarding any particular event or issue.

Sorry if this sounds a bit harsh, but the reality is, there are far to many horse owners who lack the basic skill and common sense to be responsible stewards.

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Something to chew on folk's!

When you take on horse ownership, for whatever your reasons, YOU take on the "job" of stewardship. You notice, I said "job". How long would you last at your place of employment if you did not learn what your job was and even further, how to perform the task of the job? When you don't understand something that is expected of you, the normal resolve would be to ask questions, study or research it. Then come's the whole idea of common sense! Folk's some thing's are just plain and simple to apply common sense to, without the resources of study. Not to throw stones at anybody in particular, but even being of impaired mind, one would not even consider (well maybe) leaving a baby in a dirty diaper for a week.....would they [Confused]

In these times and with the advent of computers in every home, it is beyond me how far to many stewards of animals, willingly and wantingly, choose to remain clueless. Any responsiblity first starts with oneself...like asking questions when you know there is a lacking of background and information regarding any particular event or issue.

Sorry if this sounds a bit harsh, but the reality is, there are far to many horse owners who lack the basic skill and common sense to be responsible stewards.

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