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Rattlesnake bite on muzzle (Pg 14 new update)

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I don't have any advice for you, but I wanted to give some [Angel][Angel] for your horse and some [Huggy][Huggy] for you.

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I don't have any advice for you, but I wanted to give some [Angel][Angel] for your horse and some [Huggy][Huggy] for you.

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Oh my God (and I say that because I won't swear in typing)! I am shocked at those pictures [Eek!]

Oh the poor horse [Frown] I really hope he shows some sort of improvement soon...that's incredibly scary for the both of you [shocked]

Pushin' for ya, [Angel][Angel] and it wouldn't hurt to add some of these either:

[Huggy][Huggy]

Good luck and I hope he recovers [Me Cry]

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Oh my God (and I say that because I won't swear in typing)! I am shocked at those pictures [Eek!]

Oh the poor horse [Frown] I really hope he shows some sort of improvement soon...that's incredibly scary for the both of you [shocked]

Pushin' for ya, [Angel][Angel] and it wouldn't hurt to add some of these either:

[Huggy][Huggy]

Good luck and I hope he recovers [Me Cry]

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DawnC: Yep the swelling continues to move up towards his forehead as well as down his neck. When we were trying to inject him with the meds, there was so much edema/swelling on his neck that the vet had to inject him in his leg, which wasn't easy. When we first found him, there were two, possibly three little fang marks, about 2-2.5 inches apart. We're thinking it was most likely some sort of rattler, and we plan on going through all the palmettos and killing them.

Whatever prevention I can do, I WILL, and definitely don't want my nosey little yearling filly to get bit either, she's just a little petite thing and she wouldn't last long. We have 5 acres and about an acre of it is where they are at night and when I'm not around, AND where the palmetto stand is. I usually have one in the stall and one turned out. He was the one out when he got bit. During the day, when I'm home(which is just about all the time), I turn them out on the other 4 acres to graze and play. The reason it's not all the time is because it's mostly fenced, but there is a section that is incomplete and temporarily run with hot wire. So, I keep an eye on them when they are out just to make sure they don't get any wild ideas of charging the fence(although the only thing they're interested in is playing and grazing anyways).. Right now though, he's obviously going to be in the stall 24/7 for quite a while, and my filly will be out on the 4 acres since I've been on watch in the barn all day and night. We'll probably convert our run-in stall to a regular one when this is over so I can put her up, because she WILL NOT be going back in the palmetto paddock. We'll probably hot wire or fence off all the palmettos in there, and go through and kill the snakes.

Thank you all so much for the support!!

Kate

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DawnC: Yep the swelling continues to move up towards his forehead as well as down his neck. When we were trying to inject him with the meds, there was so much edema/swelling on his neck that the vet had to inject him in his leg, which wasn't easy. When we first found him, there were two, possibly three little fang marks, about 2-2.5 inches apart. We're thinking it was most likely some sort of rattler, and we plan on going through all the palmettos and killing them.

Whatever prevention I can do, I WILL, and definitely don't want my nosey little yearling filly to get bit either, she's just a little petite thing and she wouldn't last long. We have 5 acres and about an acre of it is where they are at night and when I'm not around, AND where the palmetto stand is. I usually have one in the stall and one turned out. He was the one out when he got bit. During the day, when I'm home(which is just about all the time), I turn them out on the other 4 acres to graze and play. The reason it's not all the time is because it's mostly fenced, but there is a section that is incomplete and temporarily run with hot wire. So, I keep an eye on them when they are out just to make sure they don't get any wild ideas of charging the fence(although the only thing they're interested in is playing and grazing anyways).. Right now though, he's obviously going to be in the stall 24/7 for quite a while, and my filly will be out on the 4 acres since I've been on watch in the barn all day and night. We'll probably convert our run-in stall to a regular one when this is over so I can put her up, because she WILL NOT be going back in the palmetto paddock. We'll probably hot wire or fence off all the palmettos in there, and go through and kill the snakes.

Thank you all so much for the support!!

Kate

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I'm so very sorry! Prayers for you and your horse are coming from Connecticut. [Angel] I hope you and the vet are able to help your horse pull through.

Tracy

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I'm so very sorry! Prayers for you and your horse are coming from Connecticut. [Angel] I hope you and the vet are able to help your horse pull through.

Tracy

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quote:

Originally posted by DawnC:

Fluids!

CVM - at what point would you consider tubing and LEAVING the tube in? Or would you not consider that?

With a presentation like that, I'd personally have an indwelling nasogastric tube, tied into place, instructions to the owner on how to check for patency and placement and have that owner administer fluid every 2 hours. This horse should also have an IV left in place; Lasix to help with the swelling, IV fluids to replace the systemic fluid loss.

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quote:

Originally posted by DawnC:

Fluids!

CVM - at what point would you consider tubing and LEAVING the tube in? Or would you not consider that?

With a presentation like that, I'd personally have an indwelling nasogastric tube, tied into place, instructions to the owner on how to check for patency and placement and have that owner administer fluid every 2 hours. This horse should also have an IV left in place; Lasix to help with the swelling, IV fluids to replace the systemic fluid loss.

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I hope everything turns out good for you both. My prayers will be with you both.. [Angel][Angel] I hate snakes too and I'm glad to hear that you are going to kill them all. [Mad] Deb

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I hope everything turns out good for you both. My prayers will be with you both.. [Angel][Angel] I hate snakes too and I'm glad to hear that you are going to kill them all. [Mad] Deb

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CVM: We asked the vet if he could leave the tube in, and he said no. Also asked about the IV, and he said no. Didn't really get an explanation, I didn't understand, but I figured he knew better than I and maybe he had a reason for it, I don't know.. The swelling continues to worsen, it's down to his chest now, and up close to his ears. I really cannot believe how big his head is. It's absolutely amazing to me that he can still breathe, even though it's not much. Going to be another long night..

Kate

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CVM: We asked the vet if he could leave the tube in, and he said no. Also asked about the IV, and he said no. Didn't really get an explanation, I didn't understand, but I figured he knew better than I and maybe he had a reason for it, I don't know.. The swelling continues to worsen, it's down to his chest now, and up close to his ears. I really cannot believe how big his head is. It's absolutely amazing to me that he can still breathe, even though it's not much. Going to be another long night..

Kate

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REN0, I've already sent a PM. This is one of my worst nightmares, I'm surrounded by rattlers where I am right now, and I had Mojave Greens (the most deadly of all rattlesnakes) when I lived in Acton, CA.

I don't know of any successful use of antivenim in horses, just massive doses antibiotics, anti-inflammatories and IV fluids.

My vet had her first snakebite case in February (very weird weather) this year. The horse got Dex & Banamine, was immediately transported to the hospital and put on IV fluids, and was home the next day. I saw it the following week, there was still some swelling present, but the horse was ok.

CVM, have you treated a lot of snake bites? I'm just curious, because even here in S. CA, some vets have treated very few.

I think that if anyone is in an area where this may occur, just do whatever you can to prevent it. I always made sure any brush was cleared well around my horses' pens, and that their pens were open, without any corners where snakes could hide. A snake may curl up in a comfy corner, only to be surprised by a curious horse. That is a recipe for disaster. I made sure there were no water leaks, so the horses had their water tubs full, but not overflowing. In the heat snakes are drawn to water and cool, shady spots. In general, I made sure the area around my horses was pretty inhospitable to any snake that would wander through, either friendly or venomous.

I'm really prayin' for you, Reno!!!! [Angel]

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REN0, I've already sent a PM. This is one of my worst nightmares, I'm surrounded by rattlers where I am right now, and I had Mojave Greens (the most deadly of all rattlesnakes) when I lived in Acton, CA.

I don't know of any successful use of antivenim in horses, just massive doses antibiotics, anti-inflammatories and IV fluids.

My vet had her first snakebite case in February (very weird weather) this year. The horse got Dex & Banamine, was immediately transported to the hospital and put on IV fluids, and was home the next day. I saw it the following week, there was still some swelling present, but the horse was ok.

CVM, have you treated a lot of snake bites? I'm just curious, because even here in S. CA, some vets have treated very few.

I think that if anyone is in an area where this may occur, just do whatever you can to prevent it. I always made sure any brush was cleared well around my horses' pens, and that their pens were open, without any corners where snakes could hide. A snake may curl up in a comfy corner, only to be surprised by a curious horse. That is a recipe for disaster. I made sure there were no water leaks, so the horses had their water tubs full, but not overflowing. In the heat snakes are drawn to water and cool, shady spots. In general, I made sure the area around my horses was pretty inhospitable to any snake that would wander through, either friendly or venomous.

I'm really prayin' for you, Reno!!!! [Angel]

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Reno, I think there are alot of us on this board sharing your concern for your horse. Since you are new , I would like to say that cvm has been an excellent, very professional, and fairly conservative resource. I would encourage you to listen to her, and even ask your vet again in the morning about the fluids. You need to advocate for your poor horse.(And you are!!!) [Huggy]

Thinking of you tonight [Huggy][Huggy]

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Reno, I think there are alot of us on this board sharing your concern for your horse. Since you are new , I would like to say that cvm has been an excellent, very professional, and fairly conservative resource. I would encourage you to listen to her, and even ask your vet again in the morning about the fluids. You need to advocate for your poor horse.(And you are!!!) [Huggy]

Thinking of you tonight [Huggy][Huggy]

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Actually I must confess, I'm a 5 year board lurker... I have read alot of what cvm has written and I always agree with it, she is correct probably 99 percent of the time.. And I feel that the other 1 percent is sheer unability to see the animals she is being asked about which is no fault of her own. Trust me, I am trying my best to listen to her, when my vet comes back tomorrow I'm going to attempt to talk him into the tube and hopefully the IV, but I really don't know if he'll listen... Thank you all so very very much for your support, and steering me in the right directions, every one of you...

Kate

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Actually I must confess, I'm a 5 year board lurker... I have read alot of what cvm has written and I always agree with it, she is correct probably 99 percent of the time.. And I feel that the other 1 percent is sheer unability to see the animals she is being asked about which is no fault of her own. Trust me, I am trying my best to listen to her, when my vet comes back tomorrow I'm going to attempt to talk him into the tube and hopefully the IV, but I really don't know if he'll listen... Thank you all so very very much for your support, and steering me in the right directions, every one of you...

Kate

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quote:

Originally posted by Panda 92009:

CVM, have you treated a lot of snake bites? I'm just curious, because even here in S. CA, some vets have treated very few.


Not a one...Here in Michigan about the worst bite you get is from the mosquitos!

It doesn't matter what the presentation is or the underlying cause....treat the patient in front of you and maintain as much normalcy as you can. In this case, respiratory effort & hydration status are NOT normal, thus need to be addressed. The snakebite itself is secondary.

[ 06-06-2006, 11:12 PM: Message edited by: cvm2002 ]

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quote:

Originally posted by Panda 92009:

CVM, have you treated a lot of snake bites? I'm just curious, because even here in S. CA, some vets have treated very few.


Not a one...Here in Michigan about the worst bite you get is from the mosquitos!

It doesn't matter what the presentation is or the underlying cause....treat the patient in front of you and maintain as much normalcy as you can. In this case, respiratory effort & hydration status are NOT normal, thus need to be addressed. The snakebite itself is secondary.

[ 06-06-2006, 11:12 PM: Message edited by: cvm2002 ]

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OMG your poor horse.I am so sorry.God I just want to hug him.I can only imagin how worried you are.Please know that both your horse & you are in my prayers.And some people think I'm a B for killing poisonist snakes.I would die if that was one of my own.I feel so awfull for him [Me Cry]

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OMG your poor horse.I am so sorry.God I just want to hug him.I can only imagin how worried you are.Please know that both your horse & you are in my prayers.And some people think I'm a B for killing poisonist snakes.I would die if that was one of my own.I feel so awfull for him [Me Cry]

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