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alias113

Hoof Crack- Epoxy filler?

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I am asking for a friend of mine. Her horse injured his coronet a while ago and it has grown out, but there is a 1-2 inch horizontal crack on the side of his hoof and it looks almost like it is starting to peel downward.

She is obviously going to have a farrier out, but since she's new to the area she hasn't contact anyone yet.

I suggested that epoxy might be a good way to hold the hoof together until it grows out enough to be trimmed off. The main this is should she get special hoof filler stuff (where do we get it?) or would regular epoxy work?

We're going to call the farrier tomorrow and won't do anything to the hoof until he looks at it, but I would like some opinions on this, or information on experiences with similar injuries ???

Thanks all!!!

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I am asking for a friend of mine. Her horse injured his coronet a while ago and it has grown out, but there is a 1-2 inch horizontal crack on the side of his hoof and it looks almost like it is starting to peel downward.

She is obviously going to have a farrier out, but since she's new to the area she hasn't contact anyone yet.

I suggested that epoxy might be a good way to hold the hoof together until it grows out enough to be trimmed off. The main this is should she get special hoof filler stuff (where do we get it?) or would regular epoxy work?

We're going to call the farrier tomorrow and won't do anything to the hoof until he looks at it, but I would like some opinions on this, or information on experiences with similar injuries ???

Thanks all!!!

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Yes, proper epoxy will help hold the hoof together. HOWEVER, this horse must be trimmed and or shod while the hoof is growing out.

When the hoof is unbalanced and growing out it puts lots of strain on the damaged portion. The hoof will shift as the horse moves and could cause additional damage. Plus if the wrong epoxy is used, or if it's patched in a faulty way she could damage her horse further.

I have been battling damage inflicted by a inept shoer at my stables for the better part of a year. He high nailed, over rasped, and hot nailed several of my horses. He had me convinced I had a feed problem and that my horses were foundering. After consulting with two vets and a surgical hosptial it was determined tht HE was the problem.

We had partial acrylic build ups, full acrylic build ups, epoxy and filler on seven different horses. It ended the show season for 4 of them very early last year. Now just my daughter's good gelding is still with a partial build up. We have not had full use of him since last March. Do not mess around with this, no hoof = no horse!!!!

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Yes, proper epoxy will help hold the hoof together. HOWEVER, this horse must be trimmed and or shod while the hoof is growing out.

When the hoof is unbalanced and growing out it puts lots of strain on the damaged portion. The hoof will shift as the horse moves and could cause additional damage. Plus if the wrong epoxy is used, or if it's patched in a faulty way she could damage her horse further.

I have been battling damage inflicted by a inept shoer at my stables for the better part of a year. He high nailed, over rasped, and hot nailed several of my horses. He had me convinced I had a feed problem and that my horses were foundering. After consulting with two vets and a surgical hosptial it was determined tht HE was the problem.

We had partial acrylic build ups, full acrylic build ups, epoxy and filler on seven different horses. It ended the show season for 4 of them very early last year. Now just my daughter's good gelding is still with a partial build up. We have not had full use of him since last March. Do not mess around with this, no hoof = no horse!!!!

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My mare tore her hoof up through the coronary band as a 3 YO. Her hoof now grows in 3 pieces. Basically there's a 2 inch section of heel, then a 1/2 inch section on the inside, then the rest of the hoof. As long as you chisel file the 1/2 inch section a bit (so that it's not flaring out, getting caught, etc), it all grows out evenly...but I have used epoxy in the past.

My mare hasn't had a lame step since she recovered from her injury, but does require a custom shoe and a knowledgeable farrier with a bit of creativity. [Wink]

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My mare tore her hoof up through the coronary band as a 3 YO. Her hoof now grows in 3 pieces. Basically there's a 2 inch section of heel, then a 1/2 inch section on the inside, then the rest of the hoof. As long as you chisel file the 1/2 inch section a bit (so that it's not flaring out, getting caught, etc), it all grows out evenly...but I have used epoxy in the past.

My mare hasn't had a lame step since she recovered from her injury, but does require a custom shoe and a knowledgeable farrier with a bit of creativity. [Wink]

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It will help a lot. But I wouldn't do anything with it, till a good farrier looks at it first. It will need to be thoroughly cleaned, disinfected, and dried before applying anything to it. Then dried and rasped afterward. A good farrier should have this with them. The gun they use to apply the epoxy and epoxy is very expensive.

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It will help a lot. But I wouldn't do anything with it, till a good farrier looks at it first. It will need to be thoroughly cleaned, disinfected, and dried before applying anything to it. Then dried and rasped afterward. A good farrier should have this with them. The gun they use to apply the epoxy and epoxy is very expensive.

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So is it 'special' hoof epoxy, and that is why it is so expensive?

Putting on shoes might be a little difficult because the crack is right where the nails would go, but once it gets nearer to the bottom it should be okay.

Thanks for the advice!

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So is it 'special' hoof epoxy, and that is why it is so expensive?

Putting on shoes might be a little difficult because the crack is right where the nails would go, but once it gets nearer to the bottom it should be okay.

Thanks for the advice!

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My ex ( a farrier ) used quiet a bit of " equilox and equithane" I saw some great things done with the products...... the items themselves were not all that expensive - the average Joe can order them from the internet... the guns use to apply it were not all that expensive either.. BUT the knowledge to apply, having it in stock, and the high risk of cancer ( yes, there is a warning on many epoxies ) is what deemed them high dollar procedures... Syc

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My ex ( a farrier ) used quiet a bit of " equilox and equithane" I saw some great things done with the products...... the items themselves were not all that expensive - the average Joe can order them from the internet... the guns use to apply it were not all that expensive either.. BUT the knowledge to apply, having it in stock, and the high risk of cancer ( yes, there is a warning on many epoxies ) is what deemed them high dollar procedures... Syc

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It is expensive and the foot does need to be seen by a farrier and trimmed as to not cause further damage. Also you wouldn't want to trap bacteria and dirt behind this stuff because it really heats up. It will probably need to be debrided etc etc. There is much more to it than just slapping "epoxy" on there. Without a picture its hard to say, the hoof might be better with just a trim and using nothing or it might need something more like a little metal band screwed on to stablize it.

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It is expensive and the foot does need to be seen by a farrier and trimmed as to not cause further damage. Also you wouldn't want to trap bacteria and dirt behind this stuff because it really heats up. It will probably need to be debrided etc etc. There is much more to it than just slapping "epoxy" on there. Without a picture its hard to say, the hoof might be better with just a trim and using nothing or it might need something more like a little metal band screwed on to stablize it.

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Before the neat hoof epoxies became common, we used the epoxy wood putty, some farriers still do. It's not expensive, doesn't require any equipment to use and works very nicely. But you STILL need to know what you are doing if you use it.

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Before the neat hoof epoxies became common, we used the epoxy wood putty, some farriers still do. It's not expensive, doesn't require any equipment to use and works very nicely. But you STILL need to know what you are doing if you use it.

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We use wood putty on the hoof where the nails are clinched to make it look nice and then paint the hoof with crossapol. Makes our finishing jobs look beautiful.

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We use wood putty on the hoof where the nails are clinched to make it look nice and then paint the hoof with crossapol. Makes our finishing jobs look beautiful.

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