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Gacowgirl-2006

getting our baby gelded

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Best person to talk to about post-op care is going to be your veterinarian.

In general, steps I would take:

1) prepare a stall with fresh straw bedding instead of shavings. Straw will not stick to the incision site like shavings.

2) Plan to keep horse stalled for 12-24 hours post op, hand walking several times daily or turned out in a pen separately from other horses. The idea is that you want to keep the horse moving to reduce swelling, but you don't want him running and tearing around or getting picked on. I would not recommend any heavy exercise for 7-10 days post op.

3) Keep the area clean and dry. Cold hosing can help with swelling as well. But do not use peroxide, apply other topical solutions, etc. There will likely be discharge, and you can rinse that off...but don't use soap or anything that could irritate the site.

4) If you are having trouble with flies (which I doubt you are this time of year), ask your veterinarian what to use.

5) Know your horses normal temp, heart rate, resp, etc BEFORE surgery so that when you monitor him AFTER surgery, you know what's normal and therefore, know what is NOT normal. If your horse spikes a fever, the site may have become infected and you'll need to call your vet.

6) When in doubt, call your vet. Best to schedule surgical procedures at the beginning of the week so that if any problems come up, you're not doing an emergency call on a weekend.

Best of luck!

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Best person to talk to about post-op care is going to be your veterinarian.

In general, steps I would take:

1) prepare a stall with fresh straw bedding instead of shavings. Straw will not stick to the incision site like shavings.

2) Plan to keep horse stalled for 12-24 hours post op, hand walking several times daily or turned out in a pen separately from other horses. The idea is that you want to keep the horse moving to reduce swelling, but you don't want him running and tearing around or getting picked on. I would not recommend any heavy exercise for 7-10 days post op.

3) Keep the area clean and dry. Cold hosing can help with swelling as well. But do not use peroxide, apply other topical solutions, etc. There will likely be discharge, and you can rinse that off...but don't use soap or anything that could irritate the site.

4) If you are having trouble with flies (which I doubt you are this time of year), ask your veterinarian what to use.

5) Know your horses normal temp, heart rate, resp, etc BEFORE surgery so that when you monitor him AFTER surgery, you know what's normal and therefore, know what is NOT normal. If your horse spikes a fever, the site may have become infected and you'll need to call your vet.

6) When in doubt, call your vet. Best to schedule surgical procedures at the beginning of the week so that if any problems come up, you're not doing an emergency call on a weekend.

Best of luck!

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Ditto to BRoo! Just had Max done 2weeks ago. He will be 10months on the 18th. Kept him in the barn with his sister overnite. Then turned them out together the next day. Had to put the babysitter back with them on the 3rd day because he was being pitiful and wouldn't move enough. Of course he started following her around and was fine.

Good luck [big Grin]

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Ditto to BRoo! Just had Max done 2weeks ago. He will be 10months on the 18th. Kept him in the barn with his sister overnite. Then turned them out together the next day. Had to put the babysitter back with them on the 3rd day because he was being pitiful and wouldn't move enough. Of course he started following her around and was fine.

Good luck [big Grin]

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IMO, turn him out. the best thing for him is to be moving around, not stuck in a stall.

my last one was done in late march..no bugs, no dust. he didn't need to be hosed, i did it tO make myself feel better.

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IMO, turn him out. the best thing for him is to be moving around, not stuck in a stall.

my last one was done in late march..no bugs, no dust. he didn't need to be hosed, i did it tO make myself feel better.

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the info helps me too! i have 3 yearlings colts at the moment, but my problem is that i have no access to hosepipe (i get the water from up the road) and they all live on the land so no stable or sheltering, any tips for this?

Sorry to hijack your thread! [surrender]

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the info helps me too! i have 3 yearlings colts at the moment, but my problem is that i have no access to hosepipe (i get the water from up the road) and they all live on the land so no stable or sheltering, any tips for this?

Sorry to hijack your thread! [surrender]

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We have so many gelded over the years of breeding (18years) and I've never put one in a stall after being gelded and I've never had to hose one because of swelling.

If its cold where you are then your getting it done at the best time because there are no flies.

Do what your vet suggest as I'm only a vet tech and breeder and each vet has their own way of doing things. I can only tell you what we've done over the years.

We also have castrations come into the equine center and the only ones we keep overnight are older stallions being cut (they tend to bleed more because of the bigger blood vessels) so we can watch them for extra bleeding, the young punks get sent home as soon as they are up and around.

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We have so many gelded over the years of breeding (18years) and I've never put one in a stall after being gelded and I've never had to hose one because of swelling.

If its cold where you are then your getting it done at the best time because there are no flies.

Do what your vet suggest as I'm only a vet tech and breeder and each vet has their own way of doing things. I can only tell you what we've done over the years.

We also have castrations come into the equine center and the only ones we keep overnight are older stallions being cut (they tend to bleed more because of the bigger blood vessels) so we can watch them for extra bleeding, the young punks get sent home as soon as they are up and around.

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I also did not have to hose Max. It was entirely too cold for one thing. The other was he did not swell that much. Being out in the pasture was the best thing for him.

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I also did not have to hose Max. It was entirely too cold for one thing. The other was he did not swell that much. Being out in the pasture was the best thing for him.

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I've had two done.

The first (a yearling) was crytorchid so the incision was a bit larger. Being boarded he was penned all day so I went out and walked/light trotted him every morning before work and every evening after work. After that I let him play in the arena while I cleaned his pen. He hardly had any swelling so I only hosed to make sure the area stayed clean.

The second (10 mo. old) was a routine gelding procedure and is kept in the pasture here at the house. I did the normal walk/trot/hose routine and kept him in the round pen. After a couple of days I turned him out with the other horses for some self-excercise, still checking the incision twice daily and hosing if needed. He didn't swell a lot either.

[smile]

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I've had two done.

The first (a yearling) was crytorchid so the incision was a bit larger. Being boarded he was penned all day so I went out and walked/light trotted him every morning before work and every evening after work. After that I let him play in the arena while I cleaned his pen. He hardly had any swelling so I only hosed to make sure the area stayed clean.

The second (10 mo. old) was a routine gelding procedure and is kept in the pasture here at the house. I did the normal walk/trot/hose routine and kept him in the round pen. After a couple of days I turned him out with the other horses for some self-excercise, still checking the incision twice daily and hosing if needed. He didn't swell a lot either.

[smile]

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quote:

Originally posted by XxSiobhanxX:

the info helps me too! i have 3 yearlings colts at the moment, but my problem is that i have no access to hosepipe (i get the water from up the road) and they all live on the land so no stable or sheltering, any tips for this?

Sorry to hijack your thread!
[surrender]

i did my last one in our shed...only for us since it was very cold and a bit windy. otherwise we would have laid him down in the field. when he was all done he got up and walked away. like others have said...normally, no need to hose if it is cold enough.

don't worry, you'll/they'll be fine! [Wink]

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quote:

Originally posted by XxSiobhanxX:

the info helps me too! i have 3 yearlings colts at the moment, but my problem is that i have no access to hosepipe (i get the water from up the road) and they all live on the land so no stable or sheltering, any tips for this?

Sorry to hijack your thread!
[surrender]

i did my last one in our shed...only for us since it was very cold and a bit windy. otherwise we would have laid him down in the field. when he was all done he got up and walked away. like others have said...normally, no need to hose if it is cold enough.

don't worry, you'll/they'll be fine! [Wink]

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When we gelded our colt at 10 months, the vet told me to leave him out with our filly (who was the same age) because she would keep him moving. I put him in his stall overnight so he could get a break from her, but then right back out the next morning.

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When we gelded our colt at 10 months, the vet told me to leave him out with our filly (who was the same age) because she would keep him moving. I put him in his stall overnight so he could get a break from her, but then right back out the next morning.

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Weaver was done and didn't need hosing either. He was kept in his stall, but it was the size of two stalls, so he could still move around and everything.

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Weaver was done and didn't need hosing either. He was kept in his stall, but it was the size of two stalls, so he could still move around and everything.

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