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ckrepps

Tragedy-- update pictures 5/13, whole body pics!

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Yesterday my four year old gelding ran through a fence. Catastrophic damage...stripped the skin and flesh from just below his knee, all the way to the fetlock and completely severed the Extensor (Extensory?) tendon. We were on the scene immediately after it happened, but it was hours before I could get a vet out. This area was just hit with tornadoes two days ago and there was apparently a lot of livestock damage and vets were very busy. We just moved here about a month ago and we are out of distance for my regular vet, but she was on her way when another vet finally arrived. Long story short--new vet says my guy will never be rideable, if he manages to recover without developing a bone infection. (The cannon bone was laid bare, but no fractures). The surgery to fix him up will be expensive and at best he will be a lawn ornament. He advised putting him down. I can't/couldn't...I helped birth this boy, imprinted him, and he is like my shadow--I love him to death. I told the vet to do what he could. So now he is stitched up--on strict stall rest for at LEAST a month, antibiotics, bute twice a day, and ace to keep him sedated, so he doesn't rip out the stitches. Now, I'm just waiting and praying he doesn't develop an infection, particularly of the bone. I'm heartbroken to say the least.

Here's my question. My old vet says she has seen horses recover from this type of damage to become rideable again. The tendon was sewn back together (it was still intact and attached at the knee). She says that scar tissue will/can build up strong enough to support it and keep it together and that he will learn to compensate and throw his foot forward so that it lands flat. He is a walking horse and she says that is his tendency anyway. If he recovers from the wounds she says he has a decent chance of being rideable in the far future. Anybody out there with some knowledge or similar experience? Keep him in your prayers please.

[ 05-13-2007, 10:07 AM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]

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Yesterday my four year old gelding ran through a fence. Catastrophic damage...stripped the skin and flesh from just below his knee, all the way to the fetlock and completely severed the Extensor (Extensory?) tendon. We were on the scene immediately after it happened, but it was hours before I could get a vet out. This area was just hit with tornadoes two days ago and there was apparently a lot of livestock damage and vets were very busy. We just moved here about a month ago and we are out of distance for my regular vet, but she was on her way when another vet finally arrived. Long story short--new vet says my guy will never be rideable, if he manages to recover without developing a bone infection. (The cannon bone was laid bare, but no fractures). The surgery to fix him up will be expensive and at best he will be a lawn ornament. He advised putting him down. I can't/couldn't...I helped birth this boy, imprinted him, and he is like my shadow--I love him to death. I told the vet to do what he could. So now he is stitched up--on strict stall rest for at LEAST a month, antibiotics, bute twice a day, and ace to keep him sedated, so he doesn't rip out the stitches. Now, I'm just waiting and praying he doesn't develop an infection, particularly of the bone. I'm heartbroken to say the least.

Here's my question. My old vet says she has seen horses recover from this type of damage to become rideable again. The tendon was sewn back together (it was still intact and attached at the knee). She says that scar tissue will/can build up strong enough to support it and keep it together and that he will learn to compensate and throw his foot forward so that it lands flat. He is a walking horse and she says that is his tendency anyway. If he recovers from the wounds she says he has a decent chance of being rideable in the far future. Anybody out there with some knowledge or similar experience? Keep him in your prayers please.

[ 05-13-2007, 10:07 AM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]

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[Angel] You have my best wishes for a full recovery for your gelding. Best of luck to both of you.

Tracy

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[Angel] You have my best wishes for a full recovery for your gelding. Best of luck to both of you.

Tracy

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New vet a younger one? Maybe hasn't been around long enough to have seen what amazing healers horses can be? I've seen worse come back and be rideable, if given time. Better listen to the old vet, he's learned a LOT *out* of school!

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Im not a vet, but I have seen some really bad cuts and damage heel when you would think there was no way. Here is wishing you the very best with your horse.

Mulerider

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New vet a younger one? Maybe hasn't been around long enough to have seen what amazing healers horses can be? I've seen worse come back and be rideable, if given time. Better listen to the old vet, he's learned a LOT *out* of school!

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Im not a vet, but I have seen some really bad cuts and damage heel when you would think there was no way. Here is wishing you the very best with your horse.

Mulerider

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About 15 years ago I was teching for a vet who had a filly come in that had gone over/through a fence and degloved both hind legs from above the hock to the hoof. One tendon had also been severed. The tendon was reattached but that was all there was that could be repaired. There was nothing left to attach or sew together anyplace else. There was exposed bone is several places. That filly stayed at the clinic for about 3 months. At first she was numerous antibiotics with bandage changes and wound irrigation daily. If I remember correctly she was bandaged for a good six weeks. Her recovery was phenominal. She returned to be sound enough to train and compete as a reining horse.

I have a second story to tell as well. Working for the same vet about 5 years before the above incident a yearling filly came in that had been chased through a fence by a mountain lion. She also severed a tendon in a hind leg, although her additional injuries were not nearly as involved as the other filly. Her tendon could not be reattached. Her laceration was sutured, she was bandaged, started on anti-inflamatories and antibiotics and sent home with care instructions. The hope was that she would recover enough to be used as a brood mare. That filly also recovered better than expected, and while she never made it to the show ring, she was sound enough to be used extensively as a trail horse.

Both of these horses were quite young, but had very compareable injuries to your horse. I think that if you are very aggressive with your treatment, you may have a better outcome than what you were advised. Work closely with your vet and do everything you are instructed. If you have questions ask. If you have concerns voice them.

Good luck.

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About 15 years ago I was teching for a vet who had a filly come in that had gone over/through a fence and degloved both hind legs from above the hock to the hoof. One tendon had also been severed. The tendon was reattached but that was all there was that could be repaired. There was nothing left to attach or sew together anyplace else. There was exposed bone is several places. That filly stayed at the clinic for about 3 months. At first she was numerous antibiotics with bandage changes and wound irrigation daily. If I remember correctly she was bandaged for a good six weeks. Her recovery was phenominal. She returned to be sound enough to train and compete as a reining horse.

I have a second story to tell as well. Working for the same vet about 5 years before the above incident a yearling filly came in that had been chased through a fence by a mountain lion. She also severed a tendon in a hind leg, although her additional injuries were not nearly as involved as the other filly. Her tendon could not be reattached. Her laceration was sutured, she was bandaged, started on anti-inflamatories and antibiotics and sent home with care instructions. The hope was that she would recover enough to be used as a brood mare. That filly also recovered better than expected, and while she never made it to the show ring, she was sound enough to be used extensively as a trail horse.

Both of these horses were quite young, but had very compareable injuries to your horse. I think that if you are very aggressive with your treatment, you may have a better outcome than what you were advised. Work closely with your vet and do everything you are instructed. If you have questions ask. If you have concerns voice them.

Good luck.

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My only advise is do not feel sorry for him and turn him out. He can do so much damage with one twist and buck that all your work will of been in vain. I learned that lesson the hard way.

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My only advise is do not feel sorry for him and turn him out. He can do so much damage with one twist and buck that all your work will of been in vain. I learned that lesson the hard way.

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I don't think much of your new vet -- lose him. Anybody can dipense a 25 cent .22 shell, but it is pretty irreversable treatment. I cannot count how many times I have had almost an entire canon bone exposed and never even considered 'bone infection' to be a risk. Unles a joint is exposed (and that still is not bone infection), infection has been the least of the risks. The bone must be penetrated or fractured for bone infection to be a major risk.

I have had horses completely recover from severed extensor tendons that WERE NOT sewn together. One was a hind leg and the horse became a competetive hunter and was field hunted after the injury. He severed the tendon when he kicked at a horse across the fence and hung the top of a steel tee post. The tendon was severed at mid canon with about 6 - 8 inches of bone exposed.

His hind leg flopped and he was walking on the front of his fetlock joint. I had my farrier make a shoe and my husband welded a long strap hinge to the toe of it. We bent the hinge to match the angle of the fetlock. The farrier nailed it on.

Then, I cleaned the wound and wrapped it carefully enclosing the strap hinge into the wrap to hold the foot in place. I put him on antibiotics and put him in a stall. I never sedated him but took him off of grain and let him lose the weight.

He stayed in his stall, only coming out once a week to change the nasty, smelley dressing. We tied up a front foot and twitched him to change the dressing so he would not move his foot. I do not know how the tendon grew itself back together, but he was the second horse I had done that with. Both regained complete use and soundness.

I called a vet out for the first one (an old lesson horse) and he said what yours did. So I paid him and treated it myself. The second one never saw a vet.

The second one was a gray Shawnee Bug son that I was going to make into a barrel horse. He was a natural jumper so I changed his occupation and he was training phenominally before he got hurt.

He was stalled for about 3 or 4 months before we dared to take all the wraps off and tried to do something with the hoof. His foot had grown so long we had to do something. I called the farrier back out and he rasped off of the clinches and removed the shoe without taking his hoof off of a foot stand. He trimmed it hanging in a scotch rope. We did not want to take a chance on taking his foot back to a normal shoeing position. Then, I wrapped it back up with a bent piece of steel to go along the front of the leg at the pastern joint to still prevent him from bending it and I started hand walking him. We turned him out after about 6 months total and could not tell anything was wrong.

After about a full year, (I still had not ridden him) I sold another horse to a lady to finish as a hunter and she fell in love with the Shawnee Bug gelding. I told her the story and, of course, he had a scar on that leg. (It was not a huge scar and she could not believe how badly he had been hurt.)

She wanted him so I sold him for killer price and told her that if he rode sound, she could pay me a $1000.00 more and I would send her his papers. If he didn't, she could get what she paid for him from the local sale barn. She agreed and about 3 months later I found a $1,000.00 check in the mail. She had just taken him to him first show and showed him 1st Year Green and he placed.

She called me several times after that to tell me that the horse had won a big show or had been on a 5 hour hunt. She even showed in Hunt Point to Points. Not bad for a horse that vets would have told us to shoot.

[ 03-05-2007, 12:16 AM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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I don't think much of your new vet -- lose him. Anybody can dipense a 25 cent .22 shell, but it is pretty irreversable treatment. I cannot count how many times I have had almost an entire canon bone exposed and never even considered 'bone infection' to be a risk. Unles a joint is exposed (and that still is not bone infection), infection has been the least of the risks. The bone must be penetrated or fractured for bone infection to be a major risk.

I have had horses completely recover from severed extensor tendons that WERE NOT sewn together. One was a hind leg and the horse became a competetive hunter and was field hunted after the injury. He severed the tendon when he kicked at a horse across the fence and hung the top of a steel tee post. The tendon was severed at mid canon with about 6 - 8 inches of bone exposed.

His hind leg flopped and he was walking on the front of his fetlock joint. I had my farrier make a shoe and my husband welded a long strap hinge to the toe of it. We bent the hinge to match the angle of the fetlock. The farrier nailed it on.

Then, I cleaned the wound and wrapped it carefully enclosing the strap hinge into the wrap to hold the foot in place. I put him on antibiotics and put him in a stall. I never sedated him but took him off of grain and let him lose the weight.

He stayed in his stall, only coming out once a week to change the nasty, smelley dressing. We tied up a front foot and twitched him to change the dressing so he would not move his foot. I do not know how the tendon grew itself back together, but he was the second horse I had done that with. Both regained complete use and soundness.

I called a vet out for the first one (an old lesson horse) and he said what yours did. So I paid him and treated it myself. The second one never saw a vet.

The second one was a gray Shawnee Bug son that I was going to make into a barrel horse. He was a natural jumper so I changed his occupation and he was training phenominally before he got hurt.

He was stalled for about 3 or 4 months before we dared to take all the wraps off and tried to do something with the hoof. His foot had grown so long we had to do something. I called the farrier back out and he rasped off of the clinches and removed the shoe without taking his hoof off of a foot stand. He trimmed it hanging in a scotch rope. We did not want to take a chance on taking his foot back to a normal shoeing position. Then, I wrapped it back up with a bent piece of steel to go along the front of the leg at the pastern joint to still prevent him from bending it and I started hand walking him. We turned him out after about 6 months total and could not tell anything was wrong.

After about a full year, (I still had not ridden him) I sold another horse to a lady to finish as a hunter and she fell in love with the Shawnee Bug gelding. I told her the story and, of course, he had a scar on that leg. (It was not a huge scar and she could not believe how badly he had been hurt.)

She wanted him so I sold him for killer price and told her that if he rode sound, she could pay me a $1000.00 more and I would send her his papers. If he didn't, she could get what she paid for him from the local sale barn. She agreed and about 3 months later I found a $1,000.00 check in the mail. She had just taken him to him first show and showed him 1st Year Green and he placed.

She called me several times after that to tell me that the horse had won a big show or had been on a 5 hour hunt. She even showed in Hunt Point to Points. Not bad for a horse that vets would have told us to shoot.

[ 03-05-2007, 12:16 AM: Message edited by: Cheri Wolfe ]

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Thank you guys!! You don't know how much encouragement you have just given me!! Both vets are older and experienced...the new one is just new to me. The leg injured was the front right foreleg. The skin/flesh was peeled down like a bananna, but intact...we were able topull it back up and suture everything together cleanly. I was told STRICT stall rest..no coming out except on lead line later on down the road. He wants the current bandage to stay on as long as possible before changing. You all have made me feel so much better. I'll be working hard to bring him back and keep your advice in mind. Thanks again!

Carol

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Thank you guys!! You don't know how much encouragement you have just given me!! Both vets are older and experienced...the new one is just new to me. The leg injured was the front right foreleg. The skin/flesh was peeled down like a bananna, but intact...we were able topull it back up and suture everything together cleanly. I was told STRICT stall rest..no coming out except on lead line later on down the road. He wants the current bandage to stay on as long as possible before changing. You all have made me feel so much better. I'll be working hard to bring him back and keep your advice in mind. Thanks again!

Carol

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Cheri,

What you described is exactly what my horse was doing...when he would try to walk, the right front foot would just roll underneath him and he would be walking on his ankle..or trying to. Your story gives me tons of hope. I'm off to the barn now to check on him and give him his medicine before I go to work for the day. Thanks to all who replied.

Carol

[ 03-05-2007, 06:38 AM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]

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Cheri,

What you described is exactly what my horse was doing...when he would try to walk, the right front foot would just roll underneath him and he would be walking on his ankle..or trying to. Your story gives me tons of hope. I'm off to the barn now to check on him and give him his medicine before I go to work for the day. Thanks to all who replied.

Carol

[ 03-05-2007, 06:38 AM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]

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Hmmm did he cast the leg? Not to be a downer but I worked up until recently as a tech at a huge equine medical center (where cutting edge surgery is done). I've seen horrible injuries where the bone was exposed and tendons were severed, depending on infection its 50/50 on whether or not he will survive...I don't give false hope. I really do hope he recovers. I'm concerned he doesn't have a cast on to stablize that fetlock joint because that extensor tendon is the one tendon that makes the foot flick out so it doesn't knuckle over. I'm hoping he put a really good wrap on there so it can't move, otherwise those sutures on the tendon might not hold.

What drugs is he on? Naxcel and gent would be the recommended drugs and some will use cloramphenacol. Not only bone infection but tendon sheath infection are the worries here...again I don't want to be a downer but I want you to be very active (which I'm sure you will be) in watching for and insisting on the best treatment. You said tornados so I'm assuming your midwest? I use to live out in the midwest and coming from VA I was shocked at some of the vets (not all) that they either weren't up on things or just didn't care. In VA they do anything and everything to save horses..expensive of course. My vet bills last year were over 50K.

I'm glad to hear you are doing everything you can to help him, he's lucky to have a mom like you. They can recover from this injury as I have seen a few as well...but you must be guarded as I would hate to see your hopes get dashed...been there done that and it sucks. I also got to pick up the pieces at the equine center when the drs. would say "oh of course this horse is going to be a pasture pal but he'll survive no problem" usually me and other techs would look at each other and say..."are they kidding themselves", and sure enough they owner put 20k in the horse only to have it die...they were crushed. It wasn't the money it was the fact they thought their beloved horse was going to make it and it didn't. Thats one of the reasons I don't work there anymore.

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Hmmm did he cast the leg? Not to be a downer but I worked up until recently as a tech at a huge equine medical center (where cutting edge surgery is done). I've seen horrible injuries where the bone was exposed and tendons were severed, depending on infection its 50/50 on whether or not he will survive...I don't give false hope. I really do hope he recovers. I'm concerned he doesn't have a cast on to stablize that fetlock joint because that extensor tendon is the one tendon that makes the foot flick out so it doesn't knuckle over. I'm hoping he put a really good wrap on there so it can't move, otherwise those sutures on the tendon might not hold.

What drugs is he on? Naxcel and gent would be the recommended drugs and some will use cloramphenacol. Not only bone infection but tendon sheath infection are the worries here...again I don't want to be a downer but I want you to be very active (which I'm sure you will be) in watching for and insisting on the best treatment. You said tornados so I'm assuming your midwest? I use to live out in the midwest and coming from VA I was shocked at some of the vets (not all) that they either weren't up on things or just didn't care. In VA they do anything and everything to save horses..expensive of course. My vet bills last year were over 50K.

I'm glad to hear you are doing everything you can to help him, he's lucky to have a mom like you. They can recover from this injury as I have seen a few as well...but you must be guarded as I would hate to see your hopes get dashed...been there done that and it sucks. I also got to pick up the pieces at the equine center when the drs. would say "oh of course this horse is going to be a pasture pal but he'll survive no problem" usually me and other techs would look at each other and say..."are they kidding themselves", and sure enough they owner put 20k in the horse only to have it die...they were crushed. It wasn't the money it was the fact they thought their beloved horse was going to make it and it didn't. Thats one of the reasons I don't work there anymore.

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I don't think you can immobilize one good enough with just a bandage or wrap. The extension welded on the shoe really worked great.

I would have cast mine if I had had the way, but looking back on it, the shoe worked better than any cast would have.

Had I been able to cast it, I would have put on a cast and then cut it off by splitting it into two halves. That way, I could have doctored the open wound and put the cast back on.

I would expect a lot of the skin that was pulled down to die. It is pretty hard to get a good enough blood supply to if to have it grow back. But, the horse will regenerate and replace the skin that dies. It will fill in first with proud flesh (a good thing) and then the skin will eventually grow back.

I kept mine on IV Gentocin for weeks. I did a couple of CBCs during that time to make sure he was not having problems with the the Gentocin. Once the proud flesh had filled in, I discontinued the antibiotics and took the horse's temperature twice a day. The first time I stopped, his temp started back up and I restarted the antibiotics.

The last several long term antibiotic cases I have had (joint infections) I used a compounding pharmacist to make a Cloramphinicol oral paste. He just needed a scrip from a vet or a MD to make it.

I would not use any pain medication. Pain is a great immobilizer (as nature intended it). You don't need anything else to be hard on theis horses stomach or system. Pain medications have more side effects than other meds. You want him to hurt enough to stay still.

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I don't think you can immobilize one good enough with just a bandage or wrap. The extension welded on the shoe really worked great.

I would have cast mine if I had had the way, but looking back on it, the shoe worked better than any cast would have.

Had I been able to cast it, I would have put on a cast and then cut it off by splitting it into two halves. That way, I could have doctored the open wound and put the cast back on.

I would expect a lot of the skin that was pulled down to die. It is pretty hard to get a good enough blood supply to if to have it grow back. But, the horse will regenerate and replace the skin that dies. It will fill in first with proud flesh (a good thing) and then the skin will eventually grow back.

I kept mine on IV Gentocin for weeks. I did a couple of CBCs during that time to make sure he was not having problems with the the Gentocin. Once the proud flesh had filled in, I discontinued the antibiotics and took the horse's temperature twice a day. The first time I stopped, his temp started back up and I restarted the antibiotics.

The last several long term antibiotic cases I have had (joint infections) I used a compounding pharmacist to make a Cloramphinicol oral paste. He just needed a scrip from a vet or a MD to make it.

I would not use any pain medication. Pain is a great immobilizer (as nature intended it). You don't need anything else to be hard on theis horses stomach or system. Pain medications have more side effects than other meds. You want him to hurt enough to stay still.

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I knew a horse that went through a wire fence and shredded the front of his right hind leg down to the bone. The top of the bone actually came off. The skin died and he had to heal from the inside out...VERY long and slow process. BUT, the horse survived with an ugly scar (very sweet horse) and needed some light work to rehab after all of that stall rest and not using the leg correctly. He was treated at his own home and never got infected. It was pretty scary looking though...

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I knew a horse that went through a wire fence and shredded the front of his right hind leg down to the bone. The top of the bone actually came off. The skin died and he had to heal from the inside out...VERY long and slow process. BUT, the horse survived with an ugly scar (very sweet horse) and needed some light work to rehab after all of that stall rest and not using the leg correctly. He was treated at his own home and never got infected. It was pretty scary looking though...

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Okay..now you guys have me worried that current vet may not be aggressive enough on the antibiotics. Here's what he has. Night of surgery 1 dose IV PCN. Followed by one dose per day of Tribessen 400 (trimrthoprim/sulfadiazine) for 3 days; followed by four days of sulfamethazole 960 (9 tabs per day). That's all for now. He is coming to the barn to recheck him Wednesday morning. Only wants the dressing changed if becomes soiled or loose. Right now, it is wrapped very firmly about 3-4 layers of cotton dressing,ace wrap and vet wrap on top of that. Holding together very well--the leg seems well supported and when he is walking the stall the hoof is landing flat without knuckling under--at least at this point. I'm not confident I will be able to do half as good a job as he did while the horse was unconcious and immobile. I talked with my farrier today and described the hinge-contraption that you talked about Cheri--and he said that he felt he could do that, but wants to wait a while before adding the additional weight of a shoe to the leg. Oh, and we are located in eastern Georgia--not the midwest. Not typical tornado country, so the community really did take a beating. Nearest vet university is Athens--about a 2 hour trip for my horse and I'm not sure about transporting him on that leg at this point. More comments--you guys are giving lots of good questions for my vet.

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Okay..now you guys have me worried that current vet may not be aggressive enough on the antibiotics. Here's what he has. Night of surgery 1 dose IV PCN. Followed by one dose per day of Tribessen 400 (trimrthoprim/sulfadiazine) for 3 days; followed by four days of sulfamethazole 960 (9 tabs per day). That's all for now. He is coming to the barn to recheck him Wednesday morning. Only wants the dressing changed if becomes soiled or loose. Right now, it is wrapped very firmly about 3-4 layers of cotton dressing,ace wrap and vet wrap on top of that. Holding together very well--the leg seems well supported and when he is walking the stall the hoof is landing flat without knuckling under--at least at this point. I'm not confident I will be able to do half as good a job as he did while the horse was unconcious and immobile. I talked with my farrier today and described the hinge-contraption that you talked about Cheri--and he said that he felt he could do that, but wants to wait a while before adding the additional weight of a shoe to the leg. Oh, and we are located in eastern Georgia--not the midwest. Not typical tornado country, so the community really did take a beating. Nearest vet university is Athens--about a 2 hour trip for my horse and I'm not sure about transporting him on that leg at this point. More comments--you guys are giving lots of good questions for my vet.

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I have a pet peeve about vets who are negative and read you the doom and gloom account. [Mad] Research on the internet....and be aggressive about the treatment if this horse means a lot to you. Try not to think about the cost...because most hospitals and vets will work out a payment plan [surrender] Lots of thoughts are with you and wishing you the best [Huggy]

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I have a pet peeve about vets who are negative and read you the doom and gloom account. [Mad] Research on the internet....and be aggressive about the treatment if this horse means a lot to you. Try not to think about the cost...because most hospitals and vets will work out a payment plan [surrender] Lots of thoughts are with you and wishing you the best [Huggy]

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