Sign in to follow this  
sjf0822

Foal a bit "over in knees"... nutritional?

Recommended Posts

My foal is about 1 month old now... I've noticed she's a tad bit over in the knees right now... what do you all do for this? This is the mare's first foal, she's milking like a cow! I actually backed off the feed a bit, she's on pasture 1/2 the day, and is getting alfalfa/grass mix hay plus 2 pounds of mare and foal concentrate. Baby's eating some hay and grass, but not much interest in the grain.

Here is a picture from a few days ago

-

-

-

Also, when do you deworm the foal for the 1st time. I noticed she's rubbing her tail a bit. Mare was dewormed 12 hours after foaling with Ivermectin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My foal is about 1 month old now... I've noticed she's a tad bit over in the knees right now... what do you all do for this? This is the mare's first foal, she's milking like a cow! I actually backed off the feed a bit, she's on pasture 1/2 the day, and is getting alfalfa/grass mix hay plus 2 pounds of mare and foal concentrate. Baby's eating some hay and grass, but not much interest in the grain.

Here is a picture from a few days ago

-

-

-

Also, when do you deworm the foal for the 1st time. I noticed she's rubbing her tail a bit. Mare was dewormed 12 hours after foaling with Ivermectin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd agree, looks like she has some tendon issues. From what I see of the front fetlocks, she looks pretty upright, which is affecting the knees. That sort of thing usually resolves itself in the first couple of weeks if it's going to clear up on it's own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd agree, looks like she has some tendon issues. From what I see of the front fetlocks, she looks pretty upright, which is affecting the knees. That sort of thing usually resolves itself in the first couple of weeks if it's going to clear up on it's own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't be too concerned solong as she has been like that from birth. Most will self correct by 3 months. She's going through a huge growth spurt and by the time her front catches up she should be fine. She is a big leggy filly and if you feel she is growing too fast, I'd back off on the mare's grain too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't be too concerned solong as she has been like that from birth. Most will self correct by 3 months. She's going through a huge growth spurt and by the time her front catches up she should be fine. She is a big leggy filly and if you feel she is growing too fast, I'd back off on the mare's grain too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Restrict her exercise for 21 days - a large pen is good, say 30 x 50 maximum - and put her on FoalAide made by Buckeye. It comes in a paste or powder form. I find the paste easiest to use. She will need to be on it for 6-8 weeks.

As daisysmom says, her bones are growing too fast for those tendons and the key is striking a balance between enough exercise to stretch them and not enough to inflame them (which causes them to tighten). The Buckeye stuff is a ration balancer that makes sure the foal gets exactly the right balance of minerals to grow properly.

Don't worry about mom's grain. She will produce exactly the amount the foal demands, so unless she is chubby, cutting down just takes from her resources, not the foal's. Free choice hay. (momma will hate you for removing her from the pasture [big Grin] )

If the condition worsens at any time, call the vet, but she isn't too bad at all and I think you will notice a difference within a few days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Restrict her exercise for 21 days - a large pen is good, say 30 x 50 maximum - and put her on FoalAide made by Buckeye. It comes in a paste or powder form. I find the paste easiest to use. She will need to be on it for 6-8 weeks.

As daisysmom says, her bones are growing too fast for those tendons and the key is striking a balance between enough exercise to stretch them and not enough to inflame them (which causes them to tighten). The Buckeye stuff is a ration balancer that makes sure the foal gets exactly the right balance of minerals to grow properly.

Don't worry about mom's grain. She will produce exactly the amount the foal demands, so unless she is chubby, cutting down just takes from her resources, not the foal's. Free choice hay. (momma will hate you for removing her from the pasture [big Grin] )

If the condition worsens at any time, call the vet, but she isn't too bad at all and I think you will notice a difference within a few days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oooh, yes, mom will not be happy, LOL. Mare's an easy keeper so far.

The paste sounds good, but no buckeye dealers out here. I've seen the DAC has a paste too I think... I need to find somewhere that sells it online.

Minnie is eating the hay and pasture, but isn't too interested in grain.

I had always thought that "over" at the knee wasn't as serious as side to side deviations, or being "back" at the knee? [Question]

she was a bit weak in her hind pasterns when she was born, but that fixed itself in less than a day.

What good are foals if they aren't giving you something to worry about! [Wink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oooh, yes, mom will not be happy, LOL. Mare's an easy keeper so far.

The paste sounds good, but no buckeye dealers out here. I've seen the DAC has a paste too I think... I need to find somewhere that sells it online.

Minnie is eating the hay and pasture, but isn't too interested in grain.

I had always thought that "over" at the knee wasn't as serious as side to side deviations, or being "back" at the knee? [Question]

she was a bit weak in her hind pasterns when she was born, but that fixed itself in less than a day.

What good are foals if they aren't giving you something to worry about! [Wink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this colt was not this buck kneed at birth and this upright in the pasterns, you definitley have a developmental problem. The quicker you correct the cause, the better the results will be. I would consult with an equine Veternarian with a solid nutrition background.

You might check the Calcium content of your feeds. This is seen much more frequently when there is too much Phosphorus and too little vitamin A and Calcium soupled with too much protein and too fast a growth rate. The tendency to do this can also be very inheritable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this colt was not this buck kneed at birth and this upright in the pasterns, you definitley have a developmental problem. The quicker you correct the cause, the better the results will be. I would consult with an equine Veternarian with a solid nutrition background.

You might check the Calcium content of your feeds. This is seen much more frequently when there is too much Phosphorus and too little vitamin A and Calcium soupled with too much protein and too fast a growth rate. The tendency to do this can also be very inheritable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a mare that is over the knee as well. I bought her when she was 5 and was told she could never be ridden and we dont ride her, but i ahve sicne been told that she could handle a light rider as long as there was no jumping.

I was also told that it is casued by the joints and bones growing too fast for the tendons to keep up.

I cut my mare back on protein and stuck to feeding her soaked beet pulp and hay, sometimes some low protein pellet feeds as well, and her knees have actually corrected themselves some but will never be completely back to normal....

here's what her knees looked like when we first got her..

-

-

here's a picture from last summer:

-

here's a recent pic (sorry its not a good one)

-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a mare that is over the knee as well. I bought her when she was 5 and was told she could never be ridden and we dont ride her, but i ahve sicne been told that she could handle a light rider as long as there was no jumping.

I was also told that it is casued by the joints and bones growing too fast for the tendons to keep up.

I cut my mare back on protein and stuck to feeding her soaked beet pulp and hay, sometimes some low protein pellet feeds as well, and her knees have actually corrected themselves some but will never be completely back to normal....

here's what her knees looked like when we first got her..

-

-

here's a picture from last summer:

-

here's a recent pic (sorry its not a good one)

-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second cheri's post. I can't stress enough, CONTACT A VET WITH A NUTRITION BACKROUND. If you don't know of one call your local vet school and they should be more than happy to point you in the right direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second cheri's post. I can't stress enough, CONTACT A VET WITH A NUTRITION BACKROUND. If you don't know of one call your local vet school and they should be more than happy to point you in the right direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one of my foals was over in the knees...worse than yours....til about 8 weeks....I dont really get too concerned until they are about 3 months old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one of my foals was over in the knees...worse than yours....til about 8 weeks....I dont really get too concerned until they are about 3 months old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You want to correct it before the growth plates in the knees close, so you have some time but not all the time in the world. To correct it the foal will probably need a physicial bridge or some other corrective treatment. Your vet will be a necessity for this. What are you feeding the mare and in what amounts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You want to correct it before the growth plates in the knees close, so you have some time but not all the time in the world. To correct it the foal will probably need a physicial bridge or some other corrective treatment. Your vet will be a necessity for this. What are you feeding the mare and in what amounts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, both my husband and I are nutritionists, but he mainly does cattle... and its been a few years since I've done the mare/foal side of things.

Mare is on grass pasture from about 6 pm to 6 am. Its still fairly high quality.

They then swap pastures, and this one is pretty much a dry lot right now. On that they are fed a alfalfa/bluegrass hay that I tested at 18.5% CP. She gets 8-10 lbs of that, plus 2 pounds of mare/foal concentrate that's 16% CP. Mare is in great shape, milking well- she was on the grain twice a day just after foaling but didn't seem to need it so I backed her off. They have access to salt/min/Se block and the mare is still on her mare minerals supplement that she was on during gestation. Foal likes hay and grass, but isn't so much interested in grain right now.

The vet I use for most things saw the pics, and said no big deal. She's still planting all of her hoof (not just toe) and said its a growth issue. Mom's got great legs, but this is her first foal. Dad's babies do grow fast at times, so that's why I'm keeping an eye on her.

I ordered the DAC supplements and will try to get the foal creep feeding so I can add it to her diet, but I also got the paste as well.

Her joints don't look "boxy" like they get with epiphisitis, and she's definatly not hindered in any way. If she isn't improved in a week or so after the mineral treatment I'll see about hauling them over to Idaho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, both my husband and I are nutritionists, but he mainly does cattle... and its been a few years since I've done the mare/foal side of things.

Mare is on grass pasture from about 6 pm to 6 am. Its still fairly high quality.

They then swap pastures, and this one is pretty much a dry lot right now. On that they are fed a alfalfa/bluegrass hay that I tested at 18.5% CP. She gets 8-10 lbs of that, plus 2 pounds of mare/foal concentrate that's 16% CP. Mare is in great shape, milking well- she was on the grain twice a day just after foaling but didn't seem to need it so I backed her off. They have access to salt/min/Se block and the mare is still on her mare minerals supplement that she was on during gestation. Foal likes hay and grass, but isn't so much interested in grain right now.

The vet I use for most things saw the pics, and said no big deal. She's still planting all of her hoof (not just toe) and said its a growth issue. Mom's got great legs, but this is her first foal. Dad's babies do grow fast at times, so that's why I'm keeping an eye on her.

I ordered the DAC supplements and will try to get the foal creep feeding so I can add it to her diet, but I also got the paste as well.

Her joints don't look "boxy" like they get with epiphisitis, and she's definatly not hindered in any way. If she isn't improved in a week or so after the mineral treatment I'll see about hauling them over to Idaho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My neighbor had a little colt who's legs looked just like your filly's. They restricted his movement (kept him in a pen) and wrapped his knees for a couple days. He has since straightened out and looks great!

Good luck [smile]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My neighbor had a little colt who's legs looked just like your filly's. They restricted his movement (kept him in a pen) and wrapped his knees for a couple days. He has since straightened out and looks great!

Good luck [smile]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this